When did 50's & 60's instruments become so desireable?

83stratman

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5,187
You obviously have no idea what your talking about regarding Fender's three screw neck. It is NOT one screw less. Fender three srew system is four MORE screws, two more plates, and two more additional routes than the 4 screw system they were using. There is no way the three crew mounting was thought of as a coast savings. More parts, more labor, and more assembly time can not = lower cost.

Because Fender plans to make the strat for more than a year or two. Newer, cheaper versions of products come out all the time and they are expensive to implement at first, but save the company money in the long run. It isn't cheap for Fender to develop printed circuit board amps but in the long run it ends up saving tons of money compared to hand-wiring everything. When sony comes out with a cheaper version of the ps4 2-3 years into production, it costs money to make it cheaper, but over time they recoup that money. The thinking at the time was that the three bolt neck was going to lead to faster and cheaper assembly. the idea was that it would take less time to set the neck angle than an old four-bolt design. There is also economy of scale in using one less bolt and a slightly smaller neck plate, which adds up when you consider all the guitars and basses fender makes in a year, but i think it was primarily aimed at simplifying assembly.
 

Yamaha 350

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6,643
In 1981 or 1982, my guitar teacher told me he had had two offers of $25,000 for his 1954 Fender Stratocaster, one from Roy Clark's manager and one from a Hank Williams Jr. concert promoter. Joe Bonamassa owns it now so I imagine it is sitting in storage somewhere.
:eek:

I love Roy Clark. :);)
 

zombiwoof

Supporting Member
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5,684
Vintage prices escalated quickly in the mid-seventies and up. I was living in AZ. back in the early seventies, and I could go through the local ad paper and see a dozen or more listings for old Strats and Teles for $200-250, and LP's were only a little more. When people started noticing that the newer Fenders and Gibsons just weren't up to the standards of the 50's and 60's guitars, enterprising guys would go around and buy up every Fender and Gibson they could find at those low prices, and then sell them for at least twice what they paid. Pretty soon the market seemed to dry up for those deals from private parties, and the vintage shops had most of the good guitars that were available locked up. From there, the prices just went up constantly. Every city had at least one or two of those guys, because they got the drop on the vintage craze, many of them became very successful (think Norm of Norm's Guitars, etc.).
Al
 

Steadfastly

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1,990
When did 50's & 60's instruments become so desirable?

They haven't. I don't buy old cars to drive or play old guitars and amps.
 

Dana Olsen

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7,901
Are you talking today's money? Cause the '60 I bought in '76 was 250 bucks. That is about 1200 today, so yea, if talking today's money.

By 80, I was starting to get offers for a grand, to sell, so the price did just pretty fast the last part of the 70s.
No, not today's dollars - 1974 dollars.

A friend and I helped 2 other pals buy a mint condition 1960 Les Paul Standard Sunburst in 1974. The price was $2400 - most of my friends were scandalized at the price. All the hang tags & case candy, all original, 10 out of 10 condition, mint. It was a really good guitar. The 2 pals had $1200 between them, my friend and I put in $600 each. The partners were good about it - they paid us both back in about 4 weeks, and in the meantime, we got to play that Les Paul a lot - a LOT (GRIN)!

When I say most of my friends were scandalized, I'm talking about guitar collector friends - people who "get it." The "normal' price for a Sunburst was about $2000 at that time, in LA.

In late '75, I was offered a '62 stud tailpiece ES-335 w/ PAF's, but rectangle inlays, not dots. Cherry finish - wide neck, great guitar! The price was $650 - I turned it down because at the time, you could get a pretty good dot neck for $1000 - $1200, even $800 for one in OK condition. I thought I'd hold out for a dot neck, but it was a fantastic guitar. Offered to me by Rob Lawrence. It sold quickly, but not to me.

I bought a '62 Strat refin in late '74 for $285, sold it in early '76 for $325 - but after it sold to the first caller, I got maybe 20 MORE phone calls about it - priced it too low.

That's what prices were like in LA in the mid 70's.

Thanks, Dana O.
 
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kafka

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1,694
By the time I started playing guitar around 77-78, "pre-CBS" was already a big deal and apparently had been for some time, and 3-bolts were considered to be inferior to 4-bolts.

I'm not sure I was all that aware of prices before then, but I remember they shot up after Black Monday.
 
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ripgtr

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8,672
I bought a '62 Strat refin in late '74 for $285, sold it in early '76 for $325 - but after it sold to the first caller, I got maybe 20 MORE phone calls about it - priced it too low.

That's what prices were like in LA in the mid 70's.
Yea, well .. LA, lol. Still, though 325 sounds a bit high, cause I bought mine (not a refin) early '76 for 250, from a store, that could just be the market in your area, pre internet and shipping guitars all over the country and all that. but yea, not 1000 bucks. The maple necks were around a grand, but the rosewood not so much. But that did change fast and by the late 70s, early 80s, I WAS getting offers of a grand. Maybe it took a while for LA prices to get out to the hinterlands.

Gibsons? Yea I don't know, I did buy a 330 cheap but those were never sought after, like the 335 and LP. I know the early LPs were up there, though, even back then.
 

GiorgioV

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1,591
I'll quote you something one of friend's says as a joke. "That's okay if you disagree with me. I can't force you to be right.":D
I don't care about who's right or wrong about old guitars. A topic about which I did NOT share my personal opinion about, by the way, because it's not relevant to what fellow forum member are discussing. I care about the fact that your contribution to this thread amounts to nothing and serves no purpose except for scratching that "I need to tell others that I like new guitars to feel smart and superior" itch. Which is frankly quite insufferable.

Play what you want, buy what you like. If the topic does not interest you just stay away from it.
 

Scumback Speakers

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10,753
The 50/60's Gibsons have been popular with me since 1973. I got my 68 Les Paul Custom in 1975, and I have a few others from the early 60's, and my 59 LP Junior.

I don't know when they got popular for others, but they were sought after by this guy when he was 15 years old.
 

Steadfastly

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1,990
I don't care about who's right or wrong about old guitars. A topic about which I did NOT share my personal opinion about, by the way, because it's not relevant to what fellow forum member are discussing. I care about the fact that your contribution to this thread amounts to nothing and serves no purpose except for scratching that "I need to tell others that I like new guitars to feel smart and superior" itch. Which is frankly quite insufferable.

Play what you want, buy what you like. If the topic does not interest you just stay away from it.
I think you are a little touchy. You couldn't even get my little joke. Lighten up before you bust a blood vessel, matey.
 

Tommy Biggs

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6,067
I started going as a young kid, so around 1972. At that time the only Juniors I ever saw were in the pawn shops between 48th and the Port Authority. And they were dirt cheap.
I guess I’d be startig around 75... We Buy Guitars had all sorts of old things hanging like cordwood in their windows. A far cry from Alex Axe, Manny’s and the glossy shops, but it really caught my eye.
 
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GiorgioV

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1,591
I think you are a little touchy. You couldn't even get my little joke. Lighten up before you bust a blood vessel, matey.
I “got” the joke alright. I’m just fed up with people that have to chime in whenever others are discussing hot topics like relics and vintage and what have you, without actually contributing to the thread.
Just because you can doesn’t mean that you should.
Anyway we’ve derailed the thread long enough, I think you understand my point and I hope you have a great rest of your day.
 

jazzkritter

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20
We Buy Guitars!
Nobody today would believe what 48th street had in one block. In early 80’s Manny’s, We Buy, 48th St Music, Pensa/Suhr, the little ugly place by Manny’s with Fenders and Asian junk in the window, there was another good sized store I think by Manny’s IIRC. I still have a bag of genuine Manny’s heavy picks :)
Thank you Sam Ash.
(For you non NYers Sam Ash bought out everyone, using all the separate stores for guitars, drums, etc.)
Anyone know is it still that way I’ve not been up there in quite a while.
 

prototype

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3,524
You obviously have no idea what your talking about regarding Fender's three screw neck. It is NOT one screw less. Fender three srew system is four MORE screws, two more plates, and two more additional routes than the 4 screw system they were using. There is no way the three crew mounting was thought of as a coast savings. More parts, more labor, and more assembly time can not = lower cost.
Oops lol
 

prototype

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3,524
It’s kind of the same thing with cars...right? People shell out huge money for a 60s corvette when there are modern cars that are faster, waaaaaaaay more reliable and have built in sat nav and heated/cooled seats. Heck a modern camaro has all of the creature comforts of this decade and would blow the doors off a old 60s corvette nd do so at LESS than 1/2 the price!
But the 60s Vette is cooler! And the guitar business is a "want" industry not a need industry. And rock stars need "cool" instruments as much as they need great sounding instruments.... After all this is showbusiness
 

danelectro

Supporting Member
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2,045
When I was in high school in the mid-70s, I recall going into pawn shops with a guitar buddy to window shop. We would see 1950s Juniors for $250, SG Juniors for $175, and non-reverse Firebirds for $300. Unfortunately, everything was out of my price range so I ended up with a used Ibanez Les Paul for $150. One shop we would frequent once had a white 1960’s SG Custom for $500 and a 3-PAF 1959 Black Beauty Custom for $1000, which seemed outrageous since the prices were higher than new guitars. This was my first sense that old guitars were something more than just used guitars.
 

korus

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1,163
Factory stock original design electric solid body guitars (pre CBS and pre Norlin) became sought after as soon as they were not produced any more. For no sane reason, they are not produced to this day - for 50+ years already.

Post mid '60s versions of originals are thin and bright - treble rich sounding. The only guitars being made. For general public.

Pre mid '60s stock originals are fat and middy - mids rich sounding. Industry does not make them - not even by mistake.

A person can hear the difference or a person cannot hear the difference. We are all different. DNA. Clearly, hearing ability will define cognitive and emotional context/investment of a person on the subject. And then two opposing realities will confront.

That's all. Endless fun for young and old.
 
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