When did GAS start? and why?

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by GazzaBloom, Mar 24, 2015.

  1. GazzaBloom

    GazzaBloom Member

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    When I was 14 my Mum bought me a brand new 1981 Fender Telecaster Black 'n' Gold Deluxe. It was black with a maple neck and matching black headstock with gold hardware and a unique 6 saddle gold plated bridge. It cost her £425 (The equivalent Strat next to it was £475). That was huge amount back then.

    I used the guitar through my teens into my twenties, in numerous bands and gigs. At one point, when I played bass in a band I swapped it for a Aria Pro II bass for around a year, but got it back eventually by swapping back. In 1995 when I finally let it go it was in perfect working order, with battle cards and dings even a new neck (as it got pulled of it's stand at a gig and fell into a fireplace and badly dinged frets and neck wood)

    This was the only guitar I had and I learned everything on it. I used to try and copy all my favourites bands sounds on it through my trusty Peavey Studio Pro 110 and a Boss BF2 Flanger, I tried and somehow found tones like The Sex Pistols, The Cure, Joy Division, The Smiths, The Chameleons, The Police, Neil Young, The Who, The Beatles etc etc.

    I don't remember ever gassing for new gear, I did upgrade my amp to Musicman 65 at some point as I thought it looked like Steve Jones (Sex Pistols) Fender Twin (but I preferred the overdrive on the Peavey!).

    When did GAS start, is it a symptom of the internet as we all came online through the 2000s?, due to more surplus cash (or access to credit) as we get older?.

    When I have a Custom Shop Strat, Gibson SG Std (2013) and a PRS Custom 22, why do I somehow feel that more or different gear will give me better tone?

    I wish I would spend more time tweaking the gear I've got to get the tones I seek rather than browsing the glorious pictures of new gear on some of the retailers websites!

    I miss that old Tele and Peavey, but I guess it would sound horrible to my ears some 34+ years later.

    GAS is a curse!
     
  2. jimpridx

    jimpridx Supporting Member

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    I can't say exactly when my GAS issues started, but I would venture to guess that it started about 1970 after I had been playing guitar for a couple of years. Once I actually got good enough to start playing some of the tunes my guitar heroes played (Clapton, Page, Green, Allman, etc,), I started craving some of the gear that those guys had, especially Les Pauls, Strats and Marshall amps. A few years later the Mesa Boogie Mark I arrived on the scene, and suddenly I found I could get many of those tones at lower volumes, not that I really played any quieter.......LOL. Then multi-channel amps arrived and so on.

    In short, though, I really don't think it's an internet thing by any means. Although, I'm sure the internet hasn't helped, for it only provides us with even more information than we ever had before. Still, I'm well into my 45th year of experimenting with new gear from time to time, and to this day it hasn't stopped. I eventually learned that if I want to play the game of buying and flipping expensive guitars and amps that I was much better off buying used gear so that I simply wouldn't lose my shirt on nearly every transaction I ever made. In my case, I think it's just been part of the journey, and it's been a hell of a lot of fun, too. I guess I've just written myself off as a hopeless cause years ago.......LOL.
     
  3. AdmiralB

    AdmiralB Silver Supporting Member

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    You mean the term itself? It started - at least in the common consciousness - with an editorial in Guitar Player written by Walter Becker in the '90s.

    If you mean the tendency to accumulate 'stuff', that's hardly restricted to music. Go to any shooting forum and you'll see the same thing. Bicycling. Golf.

    I think in general it's some combination - and in different ratios in every individual - of some latent desire to have 'one of everything', and/or a tendency to mentally create scenarios where 'I'll need one of those, to do that', and/or a subliminal association of hardware with software ('I'll be a better player with..'). And probably other stuff.

    Collectors are different, I think. I have a lot of guitars, when I was shooting I had a lot of pistols...but I never had more than one of the same thing; for example, I'd never have two LP Standards with PAF-type pickups. I never had two full-size 1911s in .45ACP (well, I did, but one was a race gun).

    Collectors tend towards multiple examples of the same thing, I think - I want to buy every 1956 goldtop I can find, for example. That's not the same thing.

    Seems like most professionals avoid both sides, with some notable (Rick Nielsen, Billy Gibbons, Entwistle for examples) exceptions. Probably most pros realize they don't really need a bunch of different stuff for versatility (see: Larry Carlton)...and taken as a population most probably have better things to do with their earnings.
     
  4. PW214

    PW214 Member

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    A Long Time Ago....
    "Keeping up with the...(whoever)" has always been around. However, because the penalties for being in debt and unable to pay the debt used to be much stricter, I think average person was more focused on the things they needed to survive, while the "look what I have" group tended to be only the rich.

    Now it appears in every economic tier, because people buy on credit...and suddenly happiness and identity is tied up in what we own and not who we are. With online personas being the "du jour"...people can be as nasty as they want and still have interactions. They don't have to worry about their personalities etc....if they "own many things" (or expensive things) then they are (this has always puzzled me about online culture) accepted. Regardless. So buying new things (or the ability to buy), and showing them "to the world" has replaced personal identity. Or rather become it...

    And sadly as a result, happiness suddenly is so bound to what you own and what you can buy instead of anything else, that people honestly feel "less" if they can't or don't. So they do when they shouldn't...contentment with what you have is NEVER encouraged. And the other posters are right, it's everywhere you go. What cars you own, what vacations you take, trophy spouses etc. Adornments instead of character.

    Just a morning sociological pontification.
     
  5. VJF

    VJF Member

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    For me, as a home player, it started when I discovered Forums. Prior to that I was dumb and happy with a MIJ Strat and a Peavey SS practice amp.

    I now realize how limited that amp made me.
     
  6. GazzaBloom

    GazzaBloom Member

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    'Dumb and happy'? I echo that. Before I got into pickup swapping I always used amp EQ, guitar tone control or at best an EQ pedal to change the sound of my guitar. Now every Youtube video of the pickups that are NOT in my guitars sound amazing and better than the ones I have and all of the videos of the pickups I do own sound 'meh'

    It's a wonderful life
     
  7. rollyfoster

    rollyfoster Supporting Member

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    When I was around 11 and figured out Keith, Jimi, Dickie, and Neil all played different guitars.
     
  8. Jazzandmore

    Jazzandmore Gold Supporting Member

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    Think of all those times we laughed at our moms, girlfriends, wives when they said "there is this event coming up and I have nothing to wear" and you are seeing their clothes/shoes filling up the closet :). For guys it can be guns, guitars, car/motorcycle related, bikes. Heck Hugh Hefner collected girls at his house now THAT is GAS!

    When in lived in Tucson many years ago there were dudes barely keeping a roof over their heads, but they had the most tricked out Baja Bug or car with hydraulics that you can imagine.

    I think it's just how humans are, many of us get waaaay into something and go overboard.

    But hey my guitar addiction is my only addiction :D. I jokingly tell my friends that someday I need to show some self control :rotflmao
     
  9. 73Fender

    73Fender Member

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    There are aspects of GAS that can correspond to behavior demonstrated by hoarders.
    FWIW:
    "Hoarding vs. Collecting

    Hoarding is not the same as collecting. In general, collectors have a sense of pride about their possessions and they experience joy in displaying and talking about them. They usually keep their collection organized, feel satisfaction when adding to it, and budget their time and money.

    Those who hoard usually experience embarrassment about their possessions and feel uncomfortable when others see them. They have clutter, often at the expense of livable space, feel sad or ashamed after acquiring additional items, and they are often in debt. "

    So you collectors can carry on I guess.
     
  10. monty

    monty Member

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    Mine probably started when I joined up here. Reading about this stuff everyday just feeds gas.
     
  11. Faded

    Faded Member

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    When I got my first big kid job and first grown up paycheck.
     
  12. StratoCraig

    StratoCraig Member

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    I don't think I ever actually had a GAS problem until I signed up for a TGP account.
     
  13. BK Verbs

    BK Verbs Gold Supporting Member

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    The day I discovered guitar forums. They are so addictive for me they should be outlawed. We'd all spend a lot more time playing if they ceased to exist.
     
  14. teledude55

    teledude55 Member

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    yeah, I was happy and content with mass produced pedals from Guitar Center until I discovered AnalogMan and TGP...I was soon questioning every pedal in my chain and looking for the best. GAS
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2015
  15. somedude

    somedude Member

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    Mine started in 2003. I didn't know **** about gear and started researching on the Internet.

    Mine more or less stopped in 2013. After a decade of trying different kit I had a pretty good idea of what worked and didn't work for my style, and the realization that any semblance of nuance is destroyed by thundernuts on the drums killed off my desire to keep chasing the "last 10%".
     
  16. Kenny Blue

    Kenny Blue Supporting Member

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    When I was 11 I saw the Beatles on Ed Sullivan and from then on I fell in love with guitars... especially electric guitars.

    My dad bought me a red Strat copy made by a company called Edmund, and an inexpensive amp. I loved that guitar.

    I also began to learn about the vast world of guitars and all things related. I studied the instruments used by the popular players I had begun to listen to and love... mostly coming from Britain, following the Beatles. I acquired Gibson, Fender, and other guitar maker's catalogs. I took a large 3 ring binder, put holes in the catalogs to mount then in the binder and made a large combined book of catalogs and spent many hours just "window shopping" through the pages of those catalogs lusting after those beauties, while listening to the Beatles, Stones, Yardbirds, Dave Clark Five, Paul Revere and the Raiders, Jimi Hendrix, etc, etc, etc ...

    I used to like to draw (many times in school, while I was supposed to be paying attention and taking notes ) and I would draw pictures of cars, motorcycles and guitars.

    When they were available I bought a Maestro Fuzz pedal and then a Fuzz Face and a Thomas Organ Cry Baby. When I was 18 I began to become even more serious about being a professional guitar player and my mom bought me a 1970 Gibson SG Standard, which I later traded for a Les Paul. I REALLY wish that I still had that SG. My first really nice guitar... and the fact that my mom bought it for me without hesitation when she knew I had a passion for playing and wanted to support that... god bless her.

    In my twenties I never had a great deal of money so if I began lusting after a certain guitar I had to trade the one I currently had for the next desired model... '70 SG to a '72 Les Paul Deluxe to a '74 Strat to a '75 Les Paul Custom to a '75 Les Paul Standard ... etc. Same with amps... Gibson amp to a Sunn Concert Lead head and bottom to a Peavey Classic 50 combo to an early '70s Fender Twin to a BF Fender Super Reverb, etc.

    Later in my 30s I was able to begin to keep instruments and amps, as I slowly saved enough for the next "adoption" to my musical instrument family. Then the catalog collection was comprised of those from stores such as American Musical Supply, Musician's Friend, Guitar Emporium, Gibson, Mesa Boogie, Fender.... etc, etc, etc. Again... many hours spent in the pages of those catalogs. When the internet came into the picture it, of course, greatly supercharged the ability to explore, research and shop for all things guitar and music... and find the best sources and prices. The internet became the greatest tool for serving one's growing GAS !

    So... GAS very much began at age 11 for me ( actually a half century ago I hate to admit ) and still continues strong to this day. I can very much still remember the feeling of excitement laying on my bed looking through those wonderful catalogs in the mid 1960s again and again.
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2015
  17. pima1234

    pima1234 Member

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    Sometime around 2002, when this was still the PRS forum... and I had no idea it even existed.
     
  18. Doctor Morbius

    Doctor Morbius Member

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    As with all human desires, it started when we sprang from the primordial ooze.
     
  19. guitz

    guitz Member

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    with the internet
     
  20. C-4

    C-4 Member

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    I started playing in 1955. When I turned 21, I had 3 Gibson's, a Super 400, 355 custom made stereo guitar, and a custom made LP.
    Every semester at college that I made the dean's list, I received another guitar of my choice.
    From there, I started getting gas on a more frequent basis, and had the good fortune to play or own every guitar I ever wanted.

    In 2008, I stopped playing american guitars and found 2 European companies that I really loved. I still own guitars from these 2 companies, but did want another tele, so I bought a Kotzen tele.

    My amp gas was not as bad until I got tired of playing Mesa amps in 1993 after playing them for 18 years. I switched to vintage Marshalls, and amassed a nice vintage collection until I heard about Diezel amps from Steve Snider in 1999.
    I have been playing Diezel amps since then.

    It became harder for me to lift the Diezels about 3 years ago, so I bought a Marshall JMD-50 watt head. I still play in a band 2-4 times per week steadily.
     

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