When do you all believe music started to decline?

Defendant

Silver Supporting Member
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7,557
Yeah I really miss The Frivolous Five.

worst_album_covers_ever_10.jpg


And who could forget this version of Danny Boy!
worst-album-cover-8.jpg

What the heck? Is that the Christmas Klux Klan?

Music isn’t dead, btw. It just takes more effort to find, and effort is largely a young person’s game.
 
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870
Madonna. Dancing became way more important than singing or songwriting. As long as you could dance, vocals didn't matter. They could be "fixed" in the studio.
So funny, I was thinking similarly. I was at Live Aid in Philly. I remember Madonna's set and being taken aback by the back up dancer thing at what I perceived as a concert rather then some Broadway musical. Had a bad feeling about it that was proven right...
 

Defendant

Silver Supporting Member
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7,557
2000's for me, especially when things like melodyne/autotune became pretty much staple for most artists who's image is often more important than their musical ability. For some reason the digital manipulation grates on my ears and bugs me, probably why I tend to not like the majority of female 'artists'.

I feel you on that particular effect auto tune has, but it’s interesting that you pick out women there. It’s not like men aren’t autotuned.

Is it that women sing higher? Are you suffering the male version of women being annoyed by screechy guitars?

We’ve also been listening to pitch correction our entire lives. The old school way by making the engineer splice tape syllable by syllable.
 

Pantalooj

Member
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3,578
Slightly left of the OP, but still relevant ... on several occasions my kids (mid teenagers) have "discovered" bands from the past. "Dad, have you ever heard of Fleetwood Mac ... you should take a listen, they're really good ... found them on YouTube Music" was one example.

Peaks and troughs ... and it depends on your point of observation as to where you think things are.
 

twotone

Member
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6,322
To me, 1975 was the year that rock and pop music started to decline. Everything became more formulaic after that.
 

LolainNB

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1,080
What are we talking about? Rock? Blues, Block, Jazz, Disco,Techno, Electronica…

I can’t do this you guys. I remember when Floyd went disco (I actually don’t remember but I heard old farts complain about it) with Another Brick in the wall.

or Springsteen with Dancing in the Dark (I assume written by Cindy Lauper)

Maybe that’s when
 

Biff McFly

Member
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150
Back in 1982 I wrote letters to all the major record labels suggesting setting up a "farm system" like minor league baseball. I could see the effect of DJs even then. I was also shocked by clubs in L.A. charging bands $1600 to play at their club. The band would pay the club. The club would give you a stack of tickets to sell.

This is what I suggested. There would be 2 types of clubs set up in several cities in all states throughout the U.S. One club for young people under 21 which would be non-alcoholic. The other club for people 21 and over that served drinks.

Bands and individual musicians would be signed up and join this new Club System. If a singer needed musicians he/she could pick from the list, rehearse and do a set. The club committee could suggest mixing and matching different individual musicians or even musicians in bands if they wanted to participate in the mix and match program. These bands could also go from club to club in different cities and states that belonged to this Club System.

I admit it is a huge project that's why it would require the entire music industry getting together. I was hoping that the record labels, music industry agents and managers could band together and give talent an environment to grow. It would also make their job easier because the talent pool would concentrated. Needless to say I got 0 response.
 
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1985-1990 were awful years for music. There were some good stuff here and there, but by and large it was pretty bad.

1997-2003 was also not good.

2016 - present day is not a good time period either.

1967-1984 was absolutely incredible... an amazing run of ridiculously good music.
 

ProfRhino

Member
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10,092
All three of my favourite genres, the pinnacle of great music for me. :aok

did you read my reason ?
I'm not talking about my personal taste, that's irrelevant to anybody else. :dunno
I'm talking about the toxic concept that musical skills and competence are not only unnecessary, they are in fact totally uncool. :facepalm:bkw
this utter BS has kept generations of kids from getting serious about learning an instrument and pursuing improvement of their musical skills ...

in what universe can this be considered acceptable ? :nuts
so yes, the early days of punk were responsible for a huge decline of music in the years to follow, arguably we have not quite recovered yet. :(

ymmv,
Rhino
 

mtb

Member
Messages
328
It's easier than ever to find good music.

Spotify and YouTube recommendations are pretty good and will keep you busy until your old age. You don't need to do anything--start with an artist you like, bam, that's all they need to start recommending music. Same with Bandcamp.

You have instant access to music from all eras from around the world. This has never been possible and improves the odds of finding something you like a thousandfold.

In the past you'd hear or read about an artist in a magazine and have to schlep to the record store and hope the owner allowed in store listening. Much of the time you didn't like it, so it was a wasted trip. At $10-$20 an album, a mistake was expensive, and people were probably shy about trying new things in case they didn't love that expensive album. Now you can just buy any single track you want, not just the single the record company wanted you to buy, for $0.99. Or listen to an infinite number of albums all day long for the price of one CD per month.

You know what I don't like about "suggestions"? That it's all about confirmation bias - it narrows your taste and pidgeonholes you into your comfort zone. There's ample scientific literature, and it's the same principle around which social media are built: you are tied to FB because it keeps showing you things you already know you will like. But it does not broaden your horizon, if anything it narrows it down day by day.
And without suggestions it's an exciting journey no doubt, but you are looking for a needle in a haystack, given how much music gets published nowadays - most of it would have been filtered in the past by record companies, and the more I am exposed to this wealth of new music, the more I end up respecting the work that labels did in the past. There are some gems, but there is also a lot of unnecessary stuff, much like TV series that are so abundant now with all the streaming services - are they all necessary? Like Springsteen sang a long time ago, when cable TV was in, "57 channels of s*** to choose from".
Other than that, I agree with you that in the past you had to do your (expensive) homework to get to music you liked - but again, this meant you were also exposed to music that today you would perhaps merrily ignore.
Anyway, each time has its pros and cons, and we live with what we have, so let's try to take the positive.
 
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It began to decline in the 80s, about the time Warner, Sony and Universal started buying up all other labels and laying the groundwork to become the media corporations we know and love today. It began an era of corporate control and excessive commercialization, not only in music.

And no, I am not boomer. I am Gen X, I think I missed millennial by a year.
 
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1,120
You know what I don't like about "suggestions"? That it's all about confirmation bias - it narrows your taste and pidgeonholes you into your comfort zone. There's ample scientific literature, and it's the same principle around which social media are built: you are tied to FB because it keeps showing you things you already know you will like. But it does not broaden your horizon, if anything it narrows it down day by day.
And without suggestions it's an exciting journey no doubt, but you are looking for a needle in a haystack, given how much music gets published nowadays - most of it would have been filtered in the past by record companies, and the more I am exposed to this wealth of new music, the more I end up respecting the work that labels did in the past. There are some gems, but there is also a lot of unnecessary stuff, much like TV series that are so abundant now with all the streaming services - are they all necessary? Like Springsteen sang a long time ago, when cable TV was in, "57 channels of s*** to choose from".
Other than that, I agree with you that in the past you had to do your (expensive) homework to get to music you liked - but again, this meant you were also exposed to music that today you would perhaps merrily ignore.
Anyway, each time has its pros and cons, and we live with what we have, so let's try to take the positive.
Sure, you make good points. That said I'm not sure the label + radio DJ filters are much better. The profit motive is what drives them, and you'd get similar results to the confirmation bias issue--labels always try to replicate what sells, so their "algorithm" is roughly the same as the automated recommendation engines. At least recommendation engines can include additional data points like "your friends like this" or "people like you according to our creepily accurate tracking bought this album" and arrive at pretty decent matches, at least in my experience.

I can only think of 3 instances in my entire life where radio or TV exposed me to great stuff I hadn't found on my own browsing record stores, reading magazines, talking to friends, tape/CD trading, or using BBSes and later web resources for music nerds.

In any case, yes, let's make the best of the system we have!
 




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