Where are these mythical "affordable" LP Reissues?

Cam1936

Member
Messages
414
So if I don’t care for a vintage Les Paul and am fine with the modern features of the standard, there’s really no reason to take a pricey historic over a standard? That’s good to know. I hear over and over again how the histories are better than the standards but my last thread, folks had said that’s not necessarily true.
No there is definitely a difference. On current Historics (the specs have changed over the years) you get hide glue construction, long neck tenon and "proper" hardware. Closer attention to fit and finish (although in my experience a good USA model will have every bit as good fit and finish). The lighter pieces of wood go to the custom shop as well.
 

Drew816

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
5,255
I'm new to the whole Les Paul "thing" and am naturally jonesing for one that doesn't cost an arm and a leg (a common quest around these parts, from what I gather.)

Currently checking out Eastman SB59 Goldtops... I've got an Eastman Semi-Hollow that I like quite a bit so figured that would be a good place to start.

I've read my fair share of forums like this one where someone recommends finding a used Gibson Reissue because they're supposedly reasonably priced around the $2k range.

But every Reissue I've come across on Reverb and elsewhere starts at low $3000s and rests comfortably in the mid $4500 range.

Am I missing something? I'm interested in a quality LP style guitar without much care what name is on the headstock.
Yes, stop checking Reverb... ;)

So "why" a reissue? You just want the period correct, more authentic look and construction? As per the above posts, TONS of options that are not reissues that will get you close for a lot less money. My '08 Les Paul Goldtop Classic was $1400 used from Guitar Center, case queen, someone traded in, amazing guitar. Period correct, no, it's chambered and I don't care, it's an amazing instrument and I doubt 85% of TGP could tell the difference let alone anyone else.

Les Pauls are all about what features you want vs. how much you're willing to pay. Neck profile and size, weights, finish. And the necks vary over time too, so you have to keep on eye on this, weight relief varied too, etc.

Historics, solid body, lighter "better" pieces of wood are used and you can find some deals. But $2k nowadays, nah. $2,500-2,750 for a plain top maybe? There have been a few outstanding big flame top historics that were right at $3k here not all that long ago, it happens but the more desirable the more monies...
 

3940bigdaddy

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
918
You got to be patient and quick on the trigger. There are still decent deals. 2 months ago I got 2013 R7 with 60's neck which I've been looking for a long time for$2100. About 2 weeks ago a 2018 1960 LP Special Reissue for another $2100. There was an R4 sold last year in the emporium for $1900. Granted it had a shaved neck but was done by a pro. The guitar have change owner 3 times since last year but every time it was sold the asking price got higher. If you like LP Specials 2K all day. There are several in Reverb right now.

 
Last edited:

27sauce

Member
Messages
35,713
I be wish Gibson would quit the chrome hardware. It’s so tacky, IMO.

I’ve had great playing/sounding USA models. I’d probably be down for more of them if I wouldn’t want to change parts.
 

COYS

Member
Messages
5,519
It was possible to get an R8 in the low $2000s before all the 2020 craziness happened. Lots of non-working hobbyists buying things up. When things get back to normal there will be a glut of lockdown boredome purchases hitting the market and screaming deals to be had once again.
 

Darkburst

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
4,533
So if I don’t care for a vintage Les Paul and am fine with the modern features of the standard, there’s really no reason to take a pricey historic over a standard? That’s good to know. I hear over and over again how the histories are better than the standards but my last thread, folks had said that’s not necessarily true.
If you are not hung up on vintage Les Paul specs and looks there are plenty of great LPs in the standard USA line. The trick is to try as many as you can until you play the one that's "it" for you. The right combo of tone, feel and looks... and that's different for each player. This is coming from a guy who owns two R9's and has played many Gibsons over the years.
 

budglo58

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,598
It was possible to get an R8 in the low $2000s before all the 2020 craziness happened. Lots of non-working hobbyists buying things up. When things get back to normal there will be a glut of lockdown boredome purchases hitting the market and screaming deals to be had once again.
This is where the market is right now. People selling used LP Standards that go new at 2400 are selling( or trying to sell) a used one for 2100. Your better off waiting for a 15 percent off sale than buying used . Two things are at play. One is the lockdown with people collecting 600 a week plus unemployment in addition to the stimulus money . They had time on their hands plus they had some extra money. Also the factories were shut down for a while and inventory practically dried up. Similar things happened with dog ownership. People are buying up dogs like crazy.

If it were me I would wait . Eventually things will return to normal. The used gear market will be flooded with unwanted guitars and our pounds will be overflowing with unwanted dogs.
 

glenngross

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
424
There’s a Tokai Love Rock in the Emporium. You may want to check it out if it’s still there. No affiliation.
 

COYS

Member
Messages
5,519
This is where the market is right now. People selling used LP Standards that go new at 2400 are selling( or trying to sell) a used one for 2100. Your better off waiting for a 15 percent off sale than buying used . Two things are at play. One is the lockdown with people collecting 600 a week plus unemployment in addition to the stimulus money . They had time on their hands plus they had some extra money. Also the factories were shut down for a while and inventory practically dried up. Similar things happened with dog ownership. People are buying up dogs like crazy.

If it were me I would wait . Eventually things will return to normal. The used gear market will be flooded with unwanted guitars and our pounds will be overflowing with unwanted dogs.
Yes - this is the best time ever to be selling gear. It's the worst time to be buying.
 

zeppelinpage4

Member
Messages
269
No there is definitely a difference. On current Historics (the specs have changed over the years) you get hide glue construction, long neck tenon and "proper" hardware. Closer attention to fit and finish (although in my experience a good USA model will have every bit as good fit and finish). The lighter pieces of wood go to the custom shop as well.
Good to know. I guess I’ll have to play them and see if those added features makes a big enough difference for me. Glad to hear there are similarly fit/finished USA models to be found too if I ultimately go that route.
If you are not hung up on vintage Les Paul specs and looks there are plenty of great LPs in the standard USA line. The trick is to try as many as you can until you play the one that's "it" for you. The right combo of tone, feel and looks... and that's different for each player. This is coming from a guy who owns two R9's and has played many Gibsons over the years.
Appreciate that advice. I’ve made and read many threads on choosing the best LP and the one advice everyone seems to agree on is what you recommended. I’m in no rush, will play as many as I can before buying.
 

AculaMD

Member
Messages
54
Great info in here so far.

I suppose for me weight is a top priority. I like the Eastmans because I've never seen one over 8.5 lbs. LPs and Heritages seem to average 9.5 lbs.

Not trying to start any cork-sniffing tone debates here since they've all been had out 100s of times already, but my mindset here is I'd like to get as close to that vintage spec thing as possible and kind of see for myself.

Put another way, I want to experience an LP in all its "LP-ness", rather than a slab of mahogany w/maple cap, a tune-o-matic, and run of the mill humbuckers. I suppose to philosophical question is "what does it mean to 'play authentic'?"

The appeal of the Eastman to me is the long tenon, the traditional ABR-1 posts, and the weight thing (lightweight but not chambered). Again, not claiming any voodoo, but rather want to test the hypothesis of voodoo.

That said, I'll check out some Trads and Standards!
 

bigtone23

Member
Messages
6,132
As for Gibson, the R series stuff is certainly next level. Every time I play one of those, it's noticeably better than a typical line Gibson LP.
The Heritage H150 is a killer guitar, it's like Custom Shop or R caliber for the price of a Standard.

As for affordable reissues, I have a black 2010 Les Paul Studio 50s Tribute with P90s. For a Studio caliber instrument, it's pretty killer, especially for the $500 I paid for it a couple years ago. Doesn't look like a gold top '56, but certainly plays and sounds like one. I'm happy as a clam with it!
 

sunking101

Member
Messages
1,583
I be wish Gibson would quit the chrome hardware. It’s so tacky, IMO.

I’ve had great playing/sounding USA models. I’d probably be down for more of them if I wouldn’t want to change parts.
Nickel parts on my three USA Gibsons. None of them have any chrome. My R8 has nickel parts.
 

DonP

Member
Messages
2,488
I be wish Gibson would quit the chrome hardware. It’s so tacky, IMO.

I’ve had great playing/sounding USA models. I’d probably be down for more of them if I wouldn’t want to change parts.
The reason I bought my 2002 USA new is because Gibson changed the spec that year to nickel. Of course they change back and forth so you need to do your homework.
 

WorstBandNameEver

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
159
Great info in here so far.

I suppose for me weight is a top priority. I like the Eastmans because I've never seen one over 8.5 lbs. LPs and Heritages seem to average 9.5 lbs.

Not trying to start any cork-sniffing tone debates here since they've all been had out 100s of times already, but my mindset here is I'd like to get as close to that vintage spec thing as possible and kind of see for myself.

Put another way, I want to experience an LP in all its "LP-ness", rather than a slab of mahogany w/maple cap, a tune-o-matic, and run of the mill humbuckers. I suppose to philosophical question is "what does it mean to 'play authentic'?"

The appeal of the Eastman to me is the long tenon, the traditional ABR-1 posts, and the weight thing (lightweight but not chambered). Again, not claiming any voodoo, but rather want to test the hypothesis of voodoo.

That said, I'll check out some Trads and Standards!
I recently grabbed an excellent condition 8 lbs Eastman SB59, Suhr Thornbuckers, split coils, and hard case on the forum here for $1200 (pictured below). I'm pretty sure it is the best value for my dollar LP I've bought honestly. I had an R0 a few years back that I traded when I was playing acoustic more. That was likely nicer, but minimal differences really besides the new nitro vs. VOS feel. A tricky thing with Eastman is each one is different. I played one where the bridge pick-up cavity was routed too high on one side, possibly due to the fact that the top was hand-carved poorly. Another had poor bridge and tailpiece alignment. Even just the wide range of '59-ish neck profiles. But, when they get them right, they are top-notch to me.

All said and done though, a nice, used historic reissue likely a great value if you want a top tier LP with no compromises (including the name and headstock shape).

 
Last edited:

Carbohydrates

Member
Messages
3,061
I go back and forth on how much a Reissue is worth it. I've owned a small pile of Gibsons at this point, including five reissues (R4, R8 VOS, CR8, 58 Junior VOS, and 61 SG Special). Two of those are two of the best guitars I've ever owned in my life. Two of them were fine, but not necessarily better than a good standard USA Gibson. One of them was a total dog that got returned.

I also owned a LP Faded Studio (previously known as the Vintage Mahogany) that was absolutely stellar, and sounded about as good as my CR8. It was the second best LP I've owned behind that CR8 (3rd was the R4, and 4th was a Standard Traditional). I sold it only out of redundancy. After a pickup swap to match what my CR8 had, it was... 90% of the way there for 1/4 the price.

Unless you're chasing a specific feature set, I guess I'd throw my hat in with the "run the racks" crowd. Go play some and pick out your favorite, no matter what production line it's from.
 

AculaMD

Member
Messages
54
I recently grabbed an excellent condition 8 lbs Eastman SB59, Suhr Thornbuckers, split coils, and hard case on the forum here for $1200 (pictured below). I'm pretty sure it is the best value for my dollar LP I've bought honestly. I had an R0 a few years back that I traded when I was playing acoustic more. That was likely nicer, but minimal differences really besides the new nitro vs. VOS feel. A tricky thing with Eastman is each one is different. I played one where the bridge pick-up cavity was routed too high on one side, possibly due to the fact that the top was hand-carved poorly. Another had poor bridge and tailpiece alignment. Even just the wide range of '59-ish neck profiles. But, when they get them right, they are top-notch to me.

All said and done though, a nice, used historic reissue likely a great value if you want a top tier LP with no compromises (including the name and headstock shape).

Wow, that top is incredible! I'm finding it challenging to gauge bursts online bc they're seemingly so dependent on decent lighting from different angles. I was looking at a Traditional yesterday that looked like it had zero flame and just a dull top in general in the primary pic. But then in the next pic with some more direct sunlight hitting it, it was absolutely gorgeous.

I've come across a ton of Eastmans (from actual stores, not just average joes) with that unappealing photography thing going on. I was doing product photography and videography pretty regularly years ago, so I know the struggle... Taking good pictures of stuff (esp indoors) isn't obvious. The best I've seen is N Stuff Music, even their Squiers look stellar. Conversely, every used guitar I've seen online at Guitar Center looks like it was shot on the set of the first Saw movie.

Anyway, I pulled the trigger on an SB59/v (with their violin finish) for just under $2k including tax. Apparently it has Bare Knuckle PUs and weighs 7.7 lbs. Initially I was gonna go for a regular SB59 and maybe do some PU swapping if I didn't like the 59s, but I'm hoping the Bare Knuckles are to my liking.
 

egregion

Member
Messages
578
I'm new to the whole Les Paul "thing" and am naturally jonesing for one that doesn't cost an arm and a leg (a common quest around these parts, from what I gather.)

Currently checking out Eastman SB59 Goldtops... I've got an Eastman Semi-Hollow that I like quite a bit so figured that would be a good place to start.

I've read my fair share of forums like this one where someone recommends finding a used Gibson Reissue because they're supposedly reasonably priced around the $2k range.

But every Reissue I've come across on Reverb and elsewhere starts at low $3000s and rests comfortably in the mid $4500 range.

Am I missing something? I'm interested in a quality LP style guitar without much care what name is on the headstock.
Just go with Eastman. you get long neck tenon and ABR-1 bridge plus an ebony board. it's customshop quality. only thing you don't get is the Gibson branding and the custom buckers. But at 1500, you'll be saving 3k, so you can use some of that for some pickups.
 

83stratman

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
5,843
I haven't seen a $2k LPRI in at least ten years.

I'm new to the whole Les Paul "thing" and am naturally jonesing for one that doesn't cost an arm and a leg (a common quest around these parts, from what I gather.)

Currently checking out Eastman SB59 Goldtops... I've got an Eastman Semi-Hollow that I like quite a bit so figured that would be a good place to start.

I've read my fair share of forums like this one where someone recommends finding a used Gibson Reissue because they're supposedly reasonably priced around the $2k range.

But every Reissue I've come across on Reverb and elsewhere starts at low $3000s and rests comfortably in the mid $4500 range.

Am I missing something? I'm interested in a quality LP style guitar without much care what name is on the headstock.
 




Trending Topics

Top