Where to buy old wood for bodies?

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by markom89, Mar 30, 2008.

  1. markom89

    markom89 Senior Member

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    I've asked this question before, but never really got an answer...

    I've been wondering where I could aqquire some old wood to use on a build or two... It's pine in particular that I'm interested in. Other woods are cool, too.

    If anyone knows of any places, please post.

    Thanks in advance.

    Cheers,

    Marko M.
     
  2. shuie

    shuie Member

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  3. markom89

    markom89 Senior Member

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    Ah, I never would of thought of that... :messedup :rolleyes:
    All I ever find on there are smaller pieces of wood, that if I used, I'd have a body made of a dozen pieces. Keep in mind I'm looking for *OLD* wood... not new stuff.
     
  4. Mudder

    Mudder Member

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    Check around rurally and see if any old barns or building are being torn down. They might sell some material for scrap (or midnight wood shop).
     
  5. RadackGuitars

    RadackGuitars Supporting Member

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    do a search for reclaimed pine, you'll find a handfull of suppliers.
     
  6. markom89

    markom89 Senior Member

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    yeah, I'm gonna' look around for old barns to be taken down, but I doubt I'll find anything since Toronto isn't really a "barn" place... and you rarely ever see them being torn down.

    I searched for reclaimed pine and all I found were places stocking old floor boards which aren't a)wide enough and b) thick enough. :(
     
  7. hogy

    hogy Member

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    Old pine isn't that hard to find, it's been the standard construction wood in houses in the South for ages. Look for old floor joists, 2x8s or 2x10s. The real old stuff will have square nail holes in it. Expect some "defects" s.a. worm and nail holes, minor cracks, those can be dealt with in the building process. You'll most likely end up with a two piece body.

    Fender's pine Esquire prototype was sandwiched from 3/4 boards, the stuff Leo would have had around for building cabinets. Hence it was slightly thinner than production Teles which are 1 3/4 (planed and sanded down from rough 2" stock).
     
  8. Unburst

    Unburst Member

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  9. markom89

    markom89 Senior Member

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    Thanks, Hogy! That certainly helps knowing that he used 3/4 planks and sandwiched them! It makes it easier, seeing as the the thicker the wood the harder it seems to be to find.
     
  10. dewman

    dewman Gold Supporting Member

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    old pianos have some great old wood...and you can get them cheap...
     
  11. LowWatt

    LowWatt Member

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  12. Zhurh

    Zhurh Member

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    Hey markom, I've argued with you enough on the pub, owe ya one; got a bunch of old wormey American Chestnut, 160 years old, kinda extinct wood; mostly inch boards that can be glued together, nice grain, light as swamp ash. If ya can't find any pine, let me know. I tore down a few barns back east 20 some years back, kept the good stuff.

    Sent some this chestnut to friend who sent it onto Kirn in Jacksonville. He put it together real nice, at least I like it. Picts and no dead animals in them. I really like the worm holes, light finish, they darken right up.



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  13. markom89

    markom89 Senior Member

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    Zhurh, that looks awsome, bro! I will def. keep you in mind if I don't find any pine, and otherwise maybe in a while I'd get some of that... Looks great.
     
  14. Ron Kirn

    Ron Kirn Gold Supporting Member

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    the Chestnut was a pleasure to work with to, Light, beautiful grain, and a bit more brownish than the photos...

    Ron Kirn
     
  15. TheGrooveking

    TheGrooveking Member

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    Markom, find salvage companies in your area or contact companies that do remodeling/rehabbing. Typically they'll be pulling out old stuff and putting in new. Also make sure you check it for nails, nothing worse than hitting a nail with a expensive saw blade, to wreck your day.

    The classic example of this is when Gerald Weber of Kendrick amps bought the 100+ year old pine boards that were the floor from a very famous brothel in Texas and used them to build cabinets for some of his amps. Now that would make an amp with some history and sole to it.

    I think ZZTop wrote a little tune about the place, it's was in LaGrange.

    TheGrooveking
     
  16. Zhurh

    Zhurh Member

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    I sent 130 lbs of boards your way a couple weeks back. I insured it and have track no. but figure it will take a month to get to you anyway. When I see that you have it, I'll call. Probably enough for a few guitars. I really liked how you fit those boards together, even showed another luthier who said it couldn't be done. Curt told me that you're the best when it comes to fitting them right, why he sent them straight to you he said and asked if I could send more. Anyway, I'll call in a few weeks.
     
  17. Zhurh

    Zhurh Member

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    Ok, check out this nice Chestnut work Ron Kirn did for me, even matched the shade of tint I wanted. Boy, I like how he takes a couple boards, cuts, and fits them together to look so nice.

    The hole was from a wooden peg that was in the barn beam that I had sawn up, asked Kirn if he could incorporate it into build. Chestnut was from a barn built in 1832 and beam had been recycled from another previous barn, old stuff. Back before they had roads over Appalachian mnts, the use of iron nails, spikes was cost prohibitive; so they used wood pegs. Actually, this beam come outta a neighbor's barn back in Pennsylvania, I helped tear down. He had inherited his ancestors Revolutionary War land grant. Govt was so broke even back then, they couldn't pay army wages; gave them land 1000 miles from nowheres, ha.

    [​IMG]
     
  18. dtube

    dtube Member

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    Look for old - i.e. junk - furniture, bed frames in particular. Any time I come across an old bed frame or headboard that is buried in paint, I pull out the pen-knife and scrape down to see what's under it. I have a few winners in the upstairs of my garage right now. Granted, most examples will have to be pancaked or butcher-blocked; but old wood is usally good wood (man, there is an inappropriate and rather obvious undertone to this thread...).

    As a matter o' fact, I have a rather large, mid-50's, RCA radio/turntable (featuring "Orthophonic High Fidelity") in a gorgeous mahoghany cabinet, with matching extension cabinet, just waiting to be converted into some Les Paul-esque bodies. I'm half afraid to do any research on that RCA for fear that its some kinda collectors item ;-)
    -Darren
     
  19. Zhurh

    Zhurh Member

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    dtube, Boy, I never thought about old furniture but have got my hands on wood from an old fort built during goldrush days here along the Yukon River. Mostly cedar, never seen too many cedar strats though. Actually, this chestnut came from Crawford Co, Pa.; where we were from before moving to Alaska in early 90's. Lots of old barns here and there, ya only need one 26 foot beam to last ya a lifetime of guitars, ha.
     
  20. Chris Rice

    Chris Rice Member

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    Furniture is great for old pine. We built 4 semi-hollows out of a pair of end-tables.

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    This is old barn-wood, 1-piece top and back from the same board with an ash core.
    [​IMG]

    I hear you on hidden nails, our brand-new planer hit one last summer. Bummer.
     

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