Where to buy these parts for a treble bleed circuit??

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by Patch, Feb 17, 2012.

  1. Patch

    Patch Gold Supporting Member

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    I need a 150k ohm resistor in parallel with a 0.001 mfd capacitor to make a treble bleed circuit on my guitar.

    There are a lot of resistors and caps and just don't know which one to buy.
     
  2. MKB

    MKB Silver Supporting Member

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    Radio Shack should have all of that, if you have those up your way. You may need to buy selector kits to get the parts, and that is more expense than you need spend, but it is an easy way to get them.

    I do recall an electronics store in Canada that sells parts like this; Fry's maybe? Most any place that sells resistors and capacitors should have those specific parts as they are very common.
     
  3. fumbler

    fumbler Member

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    EBAY! Go to ebay and search for "treble bleed". You will find a gazillion entries to search through and find the exact specs that you want for about $4.

    Keep in mind that $4 is a bit of a ripoff for a few cents worth of parts but you'll never have to get up off your chair and you can keep eating salty snacks throughout the whole process. C'mon, it's the American Way! Learn from your southern neighbors.
     
  4. Totally Bored

    Totally Bored Member

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    I use these on my Strats


    You can also get the parts at Radio Shack
     
  5. dazco

    dazco Member

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    If you have any electronics shops near you that would be ideal. You really should try different values. I'd try the .001 you mentioned last. First i'd try values that are 1/4 as migh and 1/2 as high as that .001. I'm talking 250pf and 500pf. The .001 will allow a LOT of treble frequencies thru. basically it extends the range down lower in the spectrum allowing what i feel (and a lot of others feel too) is too much making for a thing overly bright tone when turned down much. I use 250pf usually. this lets mostly the highest frequencies thru resulting in a smaller ratio of highs to mids/lows and keeps it from getting muddy without allowing too much high end to pass. You can use many different values of resistors, but that too can be subjective. I just use a 220k. Seems to keep enough lows w/o getting too muddy. By the way, "pf" is just the way lower values are denoted for caps, but a 250pf translates in microfarads (microfarad=UF, picofarad=pf) to .00025uf and 500picofarads to .0005uf.

    Anyways, .001uf has always been the standard for years till people started realizing it gets too bright and thin and now a lot of people use smaller values. Try them...i think you'll find they give a more balanced tone while i think you'll find a .001uf too bright. You want the tone to stay as close to the same at 5 as it is on 10, and a .001 won't do that.
     
  6. Patch

    Patch Gold Supporting Member

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    Thanks for the info! Will try that!
     
  7. Baxtercat

    Baxtercat Member

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    Radio Shack!
    Yes, .001s are too much. 250/250 is the way to go usually.
    [Man, lookit that cool Microbus in yr pic!]
     
  8. romo

    romo Supporting Member

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    I like how Acme is completely upfront about what they are selling. I've bought plenty of parts from them in the past, and often tacked one of these onto my order just for the convenience. I've got a Les Paul I want to add some treble bleed circuits to but I'll probably go the Radio Shack route this time to try a few different values.
     
  9. tjmicsak

    tjmicsak Member

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    From the Kinman Site:


    By the way, this design works better than a 'capacitor' only -or- the parallel 'resistor/capacitor' design that some makers fit to their guitars, so if you didn't like theirs try this one. These circuits, including mine, are quite crude and won't suit all conditions. They leave very little latitude in deviating from the nominated cap value. You will have to experiment to arrive at the perfect value for your cable. To save time in experimenting you can run some wires out from the volume pot under the edge of the pickguard then you can connect various value caps and resistors to the ends of those wires in a matter of seconds. When you get the right combination they can be soldered to the pot terminals.
    [​IMG]
     
  10. scorched

    scorched Member

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    I was just going to add before tjmicsak beat me to it. I think Kinmans sounds better than the parallel version. It seems more delicate and subtle. More of a chime I think. I tried the parallel version first and it let too much treble through for my ears.

    Of course its very easy to try both. The components are cheap.
     
  11. EADGBE

    EADGBE Member

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  12. Tone_Terrific

    Tone_Terrific Member

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    Active has a Montreal location.
     

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