Which 20 year olds are going to replace Page, Clapton, Gibbons, EVH, and other aging guitar heros?

straightblues

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9,518
I have been into guitar for 30 plus years. Guitar magazine have been pushing these same few folks for that entire time. Did the guitar hero end in the late 60's to early 70's? These guys have been standing in the way of would be stars. Why have so few others been lifted up to legendary status. These guys all became guitar heroes by their early 20's. Will there ever be another round of guitar heroes? (yes I like all these guys not slamming any of them, but come on, they are all past it and I am ready for new innovative players to take their place.)
 

Ampedusa

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6,361
No one. Those glory days are over. The 4 guys you mentioned all wrote classic songs on top of being great guitar players. That's the issue. Who is writing iconic "rock" songs that are being played on the radio now and will be in 20 years? Hell, what is radio now? For better or worse it's a different scene in 2016. For me, Van Halen's 1984 is a classic, made after Led Zepplin's peak, after ZZ Tops peak, and that was 32 years ago. 32 years before that was 1952. Things change. And then later, they will change again. It's ok, everything will be fine. I just don't see a era of guitar gods with huge rock bands being a thing again. IMHO. Ymmv. Yadda, yadda, yadda
 

A-Bone

Montonero, MOY, Multitudes
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101,846
In the same way that Clapton and company replaced no one before them, no one is going to replace them. There has never been a "new Hendrix" or "new Clapton" or "new Van Halen" in the same way there hasn't been a "new Muddy Waters" or "new Miles Davis." Things change, including popular music, and although its creators tend to move from the limelight, they aren't replaced in the sense the OP is suggesting. They are supplanted by new and different (and typically younger) artists.
 

Jerrod

Gold Supporting Member
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13,114
In the same way that Clapton and company replaced no one before them, no one is going to replace them. There has never been a "new Hendrix" or "new Clapton" or "new Van Halen" in the same way there hasn't been a "new Muddy Waters" or "new Miles Davis." Things change, including popular music, and although its creators tend to move from the limelight, they aren't replaced in the sense the OP is suggesting. They are supplanted by new and different (and typically younger) artists.
How can we have new stuff if we don't have new old stuff?????
 

PosterBoy

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3,184
A lot of the recent Guitarists with a following (Rick Graham, Tom Quayle etc) just hang out on youtube because it isn't financially viable to be in a band or play live.

Maybe Andy James?
 

Flyin' Brian

Silver Supporting Member
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30,130
There are any number of wonderful, creative musicians who are writing and performing great music today. But they pretty much don't fit the definition of "guitar hero" any more and I personally think that that is a good thing for music.

One of the things that people need to understand is that it's often necessary to look for these people, they're not going to be spoon fed to the public.

In this day of short attention spans and the constant attitude of "show me" this or that and lazy research, many people simply will never hear about them.

The guitar hero era is over, they will go away and so will TGP because people who spend all of their time flipping gear to try to sound like somebody else will have nobody to sound like.
 

Average Joe

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11,723
There seem to be plenty of guitar histrionics in metal, but I don't know those genres well enough to name names.

Guitar heros is a concept the mainstream have largely done away with. My guess is that they no longer served a function in the public consciousness.
When Page, Hendrix, EC, etc were coming up, the electric guitar was still an emerging, revolutionary technology. Sounds never heard before, that the younger generation made their own. The guitar hero/virtuoso was the master and commander of those sounds - the shaman of the new aural magic. Well, those sounds are now the sound of the establishment, of the parents and grandparents of the kids coming up today. Why would they want that sound when expressing themselves?
 
Messages
1,839
In the same way that Clapton and company replaced no one before them, no one is going to replace them. There has never been a "new Hendrix" or "new Clapton" or "new Van Halen" in the same way there hasn't been a "new Muddy Waters" or "new Miles Davis." Things change, including popular music, and although its creators tend to move from the limelight, they aren't replaced in the sense the OP is suggesting. They are supplanted by new and different (and typically younger) artists.
SRV was the new Hendrix.

Today's guitar heroes are playing guitars with eight strings.
 

guitz

Member
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3,260
it's hard to imagine a 20 something springing up from the ground with a totally new and fresh approach to the guitar without sounding like we've heard it all before. Not saying it couldn't happen but I think the internets influence may have squelched the visionary young guitarist because they are inundated with stuff that's all been done before from day 1 and so less likely to pursue something new and groundbreaking, if that even exists anymore...
 

jo2012

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2,263
I'd say one of the new guitar heroes is Ed Sheeran. He may not have the technique and shred ability like Jimmy Page or EVH, but he's an incredible songwriter with numerous hits and his shows consist of just him and an acoustic. He does do some great acoustic playing live and he is a great all-around player. He just doesn't show off much.

As far as the "rock" guitar hero, I'd like to be one of the new ones for my generation haha. But IMO, no one can really hold a candle to all the guitar heroes of the 60's/70's/80's in terms of innovation, creativity, and influence. It was a different time where pop music came from great instrumentalists and brilliant songwriting.
 

pepedede

Member
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1,908
It seem's like being a "performer" is a bit of a dying art, live music is being pushed out in a lot of places due to neighbourhood noise complaint's and cheaper/easier and more popular DJ's. If you didn't grow up on either Blues, Rock and Roll, Classic Rock, Soft Rock, Hard Rock/ Metal, Punk, Grunge/ Alternative, Indie etc, basically pre-internet you didn't grow up under the influence of a culture of live music. As Josh Homme say's on the Sonic Highways episode about the early 90's palm desert stoner scene and the desert generator open air gigs, "it was no good to just be in a band, you had to be in a band that could occupy that space".
 




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