which trem doesn't thump or breathe?

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by ambient1, Sep 12, 2005.


  1. ambient1

    ambient1 Guest

    Hmmm reads like a funny question.

    I am looking at getting a trem pedal but haven't had much luck. Most pedals produce thumping or breathing noises when switched on (when not playing).

    Are any trems out there silent when you aren't playing?

    cheers
     
  2. Rid

    Rid Senior Member

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    Heh most amps does that too.
    I gather that the effect would not be very effectful without it.
    But I guess that most trems only does that at rather extreme
    settings.
     
  3. theelectic

    theelectic Guest

    Toneczar Powerglide, but it's pricy.
     
  4. heybulldog

    heybulldog Member

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    when i bought my boss trem-pan about 15 years ago, i took the first one home and noticed a clicking when it was turned off. back to the store and they gave me all 3 that they had in stock to take home and try. i found they all did the same thing to various degree. i kept the best one and returned the others. it is funny that in gig/rehersal or recording i don't notice it but i can here it when i practice alone. also if you use a power supply make sure you remove the battery first as this can cause some problems with some pedals.
     
  5. drolling

    drolling Member

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    Yup, that 'breathing & thumping' is present to some degree with all the outboard trem devices I've tried. All my tremolo equiped amps do it too. It's just the nature of amplitude modulation.

    My old Boss PN-2 has the faint 'ticking' sound that the previous poster describes, but I've kept it for the insane 'helacopter chop' trem that it does in square wave mode. My old Peavey Valveverb (all tube reverb/trem rackmount unit) has a bit of a volume drop when the tremolo's engaged. This is common to tremolo circuits, and is the reason why some currently produced tremolo pedals incorporate a slight volume boost.

    As to the suggestion to remove the batteries, many manufacturers now caution that the contact terminals should always be covered to prevent the possibility of a short.
     
  6. Spencer Smith

    Spencer Smith Supporting Member

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    this is a nice one.
     
  7. todd richman

    todd richman Senior Member

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    Generally, if you put a buffer or buffered output pedal before the trem, especially the PN-2, the ticking will go away completely. Check out reviews of the PN-2 at Harmony Central for more info on this. The PN-2 is actually a very good sounding trem-much better than a TR-2.
     
  8. ambient1

    ambient1 Guest

    thanks for all the replies guys.

    I tried out TREX, SIB, Voodoo Lads and a Harris. The Voodoo Labs seemed to have no audible noise but didn't have a flashing led - which got me demoing a Harris which has the same control layout as the Voodoo Lab but with a flashing led, double time switch and exp control - only issue is that at high shape settings the pedal THUMPED- I wasn't even playing, it was just switched on.

    So perhaps the Powerglide is the way to go - sadly its very expensive to get in Australia but if it is as good as reports say--------- I think it would be worth it

    cheers
     
  9. rabbit

    rabbit Member

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    I have the Trex and experience the "breathing" noises as well, when the pedal is engaged but I´m not playing like you described it. It does not bother me.

    I would put it similar like what "drolling" said. Think it´s just the normal hum/hiss of your (tube) amp - most amps have a slight hum when engaged which you don´t here while playing - and this hum being amplified by the amplitude modulation of the trem.
     
  10. theelectic

    theelectic Guest

    Unless you have the tremolo in your amp's FX loop, it's actually the other way around. The amp is amplifying the noise from the tremolo pedal, and/or everything before the tremolo pedal. Think of it this way: plug your guitar into your amp with the guitar's volume turned up the way. Then do a "manual tremolo", i.e. turn your guitar's volume slowly down then up, again and again. The noise from your guitar goes down, then up with the volume knob. In essence, this is what any good tremolo pedal does - it automates the "manual rotation" of the volume knob. So any noise that is present will still be there.

    The additional problem is that all electronic circuitry has noise present as well, some more than others. If the tremolo pedal adds even more noise (because of its circuitry) that's bad. Also, ticking/pumping can be caused by the mechanism that is doing the "automatic" up/down working of the volume knob: the LFO or Low Frequency Oscillator. If the circuitry of the tremolo is not designed properly, the oscillator (which lives in the audio frequency range) which is supposed to be separate can show up in the guitar signal.
     
  11. ambient1

    ambient1 Guest

    theelectic


    Thanks man! this is what I thought was the case. Sadly most of the pedals I tried "breathe".

    the Harris was going to be "IT" due to its flashing led and expression pedal speed control but at some slope settings the low end THUMPED like someone touching a plugged in guitar jack.
    Ouch.

    Does anyone know if the Voodoo Lab can be modded or should I just save for the Powerglide?
     
  12. Chrissy

    Chrissy Member

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    ambient1,

    I can imagine you'd really like the Powerglide. I've had mine for a while and love it dearly. It is a very musical effect. Low depth settings give a great 3 dimensional effect to your tone - so much so that you'll not want to turn it off, and the "brown" setting gives you a nice swampy feel with plenty of sway if you like.

    It'a a 2 channel unit, so you can set one lighter one heavier trem, or perhaps one slow and one fast and the LFO is much quieter than the Voodoo Vibe trem that I had previously.

    For me, this is one helluva trem and worth the bucks/wait.

    Chris

    PS - Flashing lights and expr pedal controlability included!
     
  13. theelectic

    theelectic Guest

    Yeah the actual noise of everything BEFORE the trem going in/out is completely normal. Nothing you can do about it if you want a really really deep trem, though it can be minimized usually by setting the intensity so the trem doesn't "shut off" lower than the noise floor of the stuff before it.

    The thumping you're describing sounds like LFO bleedthrough. The LFO typically runs in the very very low audio range like a subwoofer, from say .1 to 20Hz. So it can sound like thumping, ticking, etc. depending on what it's doing to the audio signal. No reason for this at all if the trem is well designed.
     
  14. BmoreTele

    BmoreTele Member

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    My EHX Pulsar seems pretty silent.
     
  15. granite

    granite Member

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    My Kaden Fluttertone is very quiet. I haven't noticed any breathing with my set up, but I wasn't listening for it. I guess I'll go try to notice it.
     
  16. drolling

    drolling Member

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    And that's why my favorite outboard trem is the Moogerfooger ring modulator, a device that wasn't even designed to emulate amp tremolo.

    The LFO circuitry in Bob's pedals is second to none, but if you're using vintage amps & guitars in conjunction with this pedal, you're gonna hear some noise.

    But I only use the MF-102 direct or for recording. All my guitar amps have tremolo and I've yet to find a stand-alone device that comes close to the real thing.
     
  17. eknapier

    eknapier Member

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    drolling -

    I have a MF-102, but have had a hard time finding a good tremolo setting. I can definately find tremolo there, but it is often mixed w/ other craziness that I don't want (if i'm using it for trem). I would like to get this amp-like tremolo that others talk about getting from this unit. Is there a set-up you can recommend?
     

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