Which Tweedish Amp- Swart, Victoria??

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs' started by dewman, Jul 1, 2008.

  1. dewman

    dewman Gold Supporting Member

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    Hi guys, I am virtual shopping again. This time for a tweedish amp that sounds good on its own without any overdrive pedals, only a Les Paul.

    How do you guys think the Swart amps stack up against comparable medium wattage Victorias. say the Deluxe versus the AST from Swart. I'm looking for old school dirty rhythm tones with a Les Paul - real tweedy stuff. I wanted to play this live too, but am not sure that the Deluxe or the AST would ever be loud enough (and we arent set up for miking at practice).

    The AST and Deluxe may not be enough for live playing, can you recommend other options. I've been looking at the Bassman, but it may be too close to the JTM45 amp I already have, so maybe something more tweed super or double deluxe or that big$$ swart with the 4x6V6s.

    Any other tweedish amps come to mind worth checking out??
     
  2. SBRocket

    SBRocket Gold Supporting Member

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    The Swart is amazing. It really has the sound nailed and the tremolo is perfect. I like the Victoria amps too but for me, the AST is a keeper. You should listen to both.

    As far as live goes, I play the AST live in smaller venues (100-150) with no mics on the cab and put a mic on it for bigger shows. If I don't get to mic it at a larger show, I'll bring a d13 JRT (or sometimes I just bring the d13 for a change).

    Steve
     
  3. pjrhd28

    pjrhd28 Silver Supporting Member

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    Its serious dough, but listen to the soundclips for the Louis Electric KR-12 (the clips where its a strat with Fralins). Defines greasy tweed, at least to me.
     
  4. Pedro58

    Pedro58 Member

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    The Dr. Z Galaxie is based on a tweed Super and really nails the tone in the lower gain channel. I've played it next to other tweed stuff and it's right on the money. It would most certainly cut it in a live situation, and it has the bonus of a super dirty channel on top of the tweed clone.
     
  5. Heinz W

    Heinz W Genuine '66 Relic Gold Supporting Member

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    The big Swart, the SST, is a great amp with a LP. It works well with single coils too, but it really shines with my Lester. No OD pedals required. Just the volume knob and maybe a boost. I personally use a clean boost for solos, to send them over the top.

    The SST excels at those 'old school dirty rhythm tones'. Think of the power chords in "Won't Get Fooled Again". It does screaming leads just as well. I can also get some really beautiful clean chimey tones with it as well. In the 15 or so months I've had the SST it's been nothing but reliable and consistently delivers great tone.

    The SST is loud enough for most un-miked situations. At our full band jams, where we don't really play *super* loud, I usually play rhythm with both pups around 3-4 on the volume knobs. Being the LP guy among a couple of Strat players I can drown out anyone there if I choose to do so, even my friend with the Germino Club 40 through a 4x12. Our amps aren't miked. We play in an open-ended room that's about 15x25.

    The only Vicky I have experience with is a 45410 that my friend used briefly (it sounded great) before switching to the Club 40. The harp player in our jam group now uses the 45410. It's a very nice amp.

    Remember that they are two different amps; 6L6 vs. 6V6, 4 10s vs. 2 12s, etc. To me however there is no contest between those two, the Swart SST wins easily.

    You're in NC, go to Fat Sound and check one out.
     
  6. bbarnard

    bbarnard Member

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    Blankenship Fatboy Supreme may be just what you are looking for. Roy makes a stellar product.
     
  7. tommytomcat

    tommytomcat Member

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    I'm a big fan of the 5e7/5f4/5e5a circuit. Great for early r&r, stones, blues, jump. Very touch sensitive, cleans up well with the guitars volume control, not head splitting loud when played in the sweet spot. I just hate seeing people pay $1500++++ for one when I can build one with upgradesfor $700-800.
     
  8. dewman

    dewman Gold Supporting Member

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    anyone else??
     
  9. deeval

    deeval Supporting Member

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    Victoria 35210 is killer with a LP,its a 5F4 circuit
     
  10. straightblues

    straightblues Member

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    I have a Tweed Bandmaster clone. It would fit the bill. Mine was made by Hotbottle Amps. All the good stuff without the big price. If you want to get a clone built, go to the Weber Speaker boards and they have a thing where all the small builders bid for the amp you spec.

    Tweed amps are very tricky. You need to crank them to get the tone. If it is too big, you won't get the breakup. If it is too small, it will be filthy and you won't be heard. If you are serious about tweed tone, one amp will not do. I personally have four.

    After lots of years of trying to match the right sized amp to each gig, I have gone to a 50's Supro amp (about 8 watts). I plug into the front of the Supro then I run a line out of it and run that line into the front of a silver Face Fender Twin. Now I have all the power in the world and can get my broken up tweed tone at virtually any volume.

    Another great option which shouldn't be overlooked is the use of pedals. The Clark Gainster, or the Greer Ghetto Stomp are considered the best two tweed pedals by all of the blues guys. If you match one of these two pedals with your JTM 45 you will get some very convincing tweed tones. As a tweed starting point, I would start with these pedals. You might find, that you end here. If not, you will certainly figure out what your volume requirements are so you can better match the size of amp you are buying.

    Also, you will need one of these two pedals anyway for those nights when your Tweed amp is just too loud to breakup in the room that you are playing. I would never take out one of my larger Tweed amps without my Gainster just in case I needed it. I have trying to guess the right size of tweed amp for at least 15 years. I still get it right only about 80 percent of the time. There are just too many variables (size of room, number of people, ceiling height, natural echo in the room, etc.).
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2008
  11. dead mike

    dead mike Member

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    the best tweed style amp i ever heard was a Gomez El Sonido. Wow i wish i had some cash, that is the amp.
     
  12. frank62

    frank62 Member

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    The Fender 57 Twin RI.
     
  13. daysleeper

    daysleeper Member

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    Mike Clark is a master of the tweed.
     
  14. G&L Player

    G&L Player Member

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    Swart AST. Plenty loud for small to medium sized bars......my drummer is from the John Bonham school. He really hits 'em hard, and I have no problem being heard. I'm using a Suhr Classic, or a Suhr Pro 1, and can get really nice distortion without a pedal (especially with the Pro - humbucker in the bridge). I would guess you would have no problem getting the tone you're looking for w/ a Les Paul.
     
  15. mad dog

    mad dog Silver Supporting Member

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    Gotta put in a vote for Doug Sewell. His Wampus Cat is at heart a tweed pro, with some extra tonal tricks. No tweed on the outside, but the tones are very much in the tweed zone. As good as this amp is stock, with a switchable fixed bias mod installed it's even more useful on stage. If you like tweed pros (I sure do), the WC is worth seeking out.
     
  16. Shark Sandwich

    Shark Sandwich Member

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    wow, are there any builders that aren't doing the tweed thing these days?
     
  17. dewman

    dewman Gold Supporting Member

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    Does the Swart lose a lot of volume when you roll the guitar volume back or does it clean up with a slight loss (which would be better obviously)??
     
  18. G&L Player

    G&L Player Member

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    Slight loss. Cleans up nicely. Very dynamic amp, especially with the 5Y3 rectifier installed vs the 5AR4. The amp circuit was originally designed around the 5Y3, but with the lack of reliable current production 5Y3s, they decided to use the 5AR4. I've got NOS 5Y3 and 5ARs, and there is a little bit of a volume drop with the 5Y3, but the breakup is a lot creamier/smoother, which is what I like. As far as the volume, the amp is plenty, plenty loud for most situations (without a mike).


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  19. sanhozay

    sanhozay klon free since 2009

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    I prefer the Swart just because it's such a wonderful sound!

    It's sounds reedy, warm and organic but just because it's covered in a tweed cabinet don't expect it to nail a Fender 1x12 Deluxe. It's cleaner, louder and perhaps a bit darker and creamier. The gain is there but it comes on later than a Deluxe and stays sweeter with the verb. Not nearly as in your face or direct as the narrow panel tweed. And quite a bit more dimensional sounding, as the cabinet design produces less rattle and spitting and projects sound all over the place. The speaker to the Swart takes quite a bit of time to break in. It stays flat and congested longer than I expected and was concerned the amp projected too boxy. All that goes away when the speaker breaks in. The AST is a very cool amp but will probably disappoint you if you want it to be strictly a Fender Tweed. Victoria & Clark phone that act in 24/7.
     
  20. sanhozay

    sanhozay klon free since 2009

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    Also...I hope my post doesn't sound like I'm knocking the tweed deluxe 1x12 style amps. I owned a Victoria 1x12 for about five years, so I love that sound. I played a Clark version and liked it better. Just a warmer and sweeter sound. Might have just been the speaker, which was a blue as opposed to a ceramic Jensen in mine. I think my ears prefer the bigger tweeds like the Bassman or the '57 low powered twin. It's tough to beat the tweed sound with a big cabinet & multiple speakers.
     

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