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Who else removes pick guards from acoustics?

wire-n-wood

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
4,350
I have a beautiful little Taylor GS mini in mahogany. Absolutely no need to glue a slab of plastic on the front. Removed it.

Honestly, I'd rather have the grooves of wear from running a pick or finger nails across the body than an ugly plastic plate. Tear it up as god intended. It's a sign of love when the body is scraped up. What the hell else do we think god created that tree for?

Lots of love,
your inebriated comrade
 

Tony Done

Member
Messages
5,899
I try to avoid finish damage, so I use one if I need it*, but wouldn't bother removing one just for the sake of it, especially on a not-new guitar (think tan lines and minor adhesive damage to the surface.).

*I'm a fingerpicker, and don't need one when except when playing lap style, when my nails touch the top. I made one for my kona, which has a very soft oil-finished mahogany (sapele?) top.
 

JiveJust

Member
Messages
2,652
I have a beautiful little Taylor GS mini in mahogany. Absolutely no need to glue a slab of plastic on the front. Removed it.

Honestly, I'd rather have the grooves of wear from running a pick or finger nails across the body than an ugly plastic plate. Tear it up as god intended. It's a sign of love when the body is scraped up. What the hell else do we think god created that tree for?

Lots of love,
your inebriated comrade

I have a natural finish (spruce I think) 1926 Gibson L-01 that had a crazy long triangle shaped after market pick-guard screwed into the top for some reason. It just looked wrong plus it was warped outward so it rattled when you played. That guitar is thrashed. It has the rash that you speak of. I can only imagine Freddy Kruger once owned the guitar. It's got character for sure.
 
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rumstove

Member
Messages
557
I have a Fender DG-11...cheap laminated wood acoustic from early 2000s. Plays great but doesn't sound good. The pickguard started peeling up on the edges so I took it off.

My Guild DV-6 has a pickguard on it. If it starts peeling up on the edges I'll take it off, but no plans to otherwise.
 

feet

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
4,646
I would remove the ghost pickguards from my yairis if I could, and put regular old ones on them instead. But they sound too good for me to care that much.

I love pickguards. Not having one is like a wasted opportunity to look awesome.
 

edward

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
4,432
Mine had none, but long ago I added a Taylor clear pg. Totally invisible except under certain angles against light, so there is that.


Then again, I totally get what you're saying! On another acoustic I play a bunch (just refretted it recently in fact) I figured, nah ...I'm just gonna play like it was meant to be played. :D

Edward
 
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s2y

Member
Messages
19,138
I typically order my acoustics without a pickguard. My Bob Thompson acoustics have pickguards and I'll more than likely keep them on. I'm usually accurate enough that I really don't need one.
 

fjblair

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
13,359
I don't think I have never owned an acoustic that didn't have a pickguard.
 

Dr. Tinnitus

Member
Messages
2,782
People should keep in mind that removing a pickguard from a naturally finished guitar can be problematic, as the finish under the pickguard can be significantly lighter in color.

Basically it's like a pickguard tan line.
 

AxemanVR

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
229

It has never occurred to me to remove a pickguard on an acoustic guitar.

If I bought an acoustic that came without one already installed I suppose I’d do without it - but I really can’t imagine why I’d go through all the trouble of removing one unless there was some functional purpose or sonic improvement that makes it worth doing so...


 

jakefmvermont

Member
Messages
1,195
I've never removed one...but both of my acoustics didn't have pick guards on them when I bought them and I didn't put one on. That is, until last year when a hole was about to be worn in on one, and I put a clear plastic guard on to avoid any potential structural damage.

 

csweldon

Member
Messages
888
I recently did the opposite on a Maestro Temasek I treated myself to; when I play out, I’m an aggressive strummer. Figured it’d be easier to replace the pickguard than fix the top... I got one show in over the summer with it and the aftermath immediately validated the decision haha

If I were more refined, I would have left it be.
 

navigate40

Member
Messages
133
I removed the one on an Epi masterbilt I had. It was cheap, and simple to remove.

The Breedlove I have does not have one....I like that.

Have a Martin and Eastman that have them.....not touching those.
 

zombywoof

Member
Messages
4,468
I have to say what passes for firestripe these days is pretty nasty. It seems to be a lost art. If anything though I am more apt to add a pickguard but my repair guy makes them so they are a nice thin celluloid. Problem with some older guitars is the pickguards were applied to bare wood so a refinish is required. In the case of NYC Epiphone flattops the scratchplates were not only applied to bare wood but actually set into the top. Here is what I found underneath the large ugly double screwed on pickguard which had adorned my 1955/56 Epiphone FT-79 when I first stumbled upon it. Warning, not for the faint of heart.
 

wire-n-wood

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
4,350
I've never removed one...but both of my acoustics didn't have pick guards on them when I bought them and I didn't put one on. That is, until last year when a hole was about to be worn in on one, and I put a clear plastic guard on to avoid any potential structural damage.

If I needed to add a pickguard (as I agree, you totally needed to here), then I'd add a wooden pickguard. Of course it will wear. But I'd rather buy a couple for spare, and replace them when the time comes. I'm just not a fan of plastic slabs glued to the face of pieces of art otherwise crafted from wood. There's also an interesting style of carved leather pickguard out there, even etched metal.
 

Mr Fingers

Member
Messages
2,538
Pickguards exist because most people find them useful. If your technique makes them unnecessary, terrific for you. I've had somne frantastic old guitars that would have been ruined (or re-topped) to fix playwear except pickguards saved them. A pickguard is an integral part of the functional design of a guitar -- not a cosmetic add-on. However, I do think a buffable, super-light, non-shrinking, and clear modern version would be preferable to continuing to use materials thatr have been disappointing in performance over time.
 




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