Who here makes their own pedals, designs them, assembles them?

arpegadream

Member
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574
I know the industry leaders are here, they often come in and give us heads up and stuff.

But what about your guys that are shade tree mechanics with pedals? Who here does that, and what have you made?

Do you ever lay out and etch your own boards? Do you research components and breadboard them?

Or how about those of you building kits, how many of you are there here?
 
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I build pedals from time to time, mostly during holiday season to get away from the outside world, helps me to get down a little. Like most other builders I started by building kits years ago. These days I'm only into the classic circuits, mostly fuzz pedals and I've also built some Uni-Vibes. I try to use my own pcb design whenever I can, but I don't etch and just use veroboard. It's sometimes a pain in the ass to work with, but I think it looks cool. Here's a rangemaster clone I built a while ago:




 
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AJC

Member
Messages
41
I started with a couple of kits, then moved to stripboard and perf. I’ve built a little of everything, but dozens of overdrive, fuzzes, and boosts.
I have not etched or designed any PCBs, yet, but I’ll buy some here and there. I e not done too much bread boarding, but I leave a fuzz face setup on one to try out different transistors easier.
 

amz-fx

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,617
I build pedals from time to time, mostly during holiday season to get away from the outside world, helps me to get down a little. Like most other builders I started by building kits years ago. These days I'm only into the classic circuits, mostly fuzz pedals and I've also built some Uni-Vibes. I try to use my own pcb design whenever I can, but I don't etch and just use veroboard. It's sometimes a pain in the ass to work with, but I think it looks cool. Here's a rangemaster clone I built a while ago:
Great looking project!

Best regards, Jack
 

monkeybrains

Member
Messages
850
Do you guys sell to the public?
Do you approach other builders to sell them your designs or partnership with them.?
 

jlo

Member
Messages
280
I build pedals from time to time, mostly during holiday season to get away from the outside world, helps me to get down a little. Like most other builders I started by building kits years ago. These days I'm only into the classic circuits, mostly fuzz pedals and I've also built some Uni-Vibes. I try to use my own pcb design whenever I can, but I don't etch and just use veroboard. It's sometimes a pain in the ass to work with, but I think it looks cool. Here's a rangemaster clone I built a while ago:




Tidy! How did you mount the vero?
 
Messages
3,010
Do you guys sell to the public?
Do you approach other builders to sell them your designs or partnership with them.?
I don't build with the intend to sell, but I've sold pedals to friends and others when they approached me. I've also done some custom work in the past, but I rarely do it these days, because the revenue is just too small for me as a hobbyist to make it worthwile. Regarding your second question, I have nothing innovative to offer. I just like tidy and neat looking gutshots.
Tidy! How did you mount the vero?
Thanks! I use small pcb spacers, which come in various forms and sizes. They have a small thread inside (I usually use M3 sized screws). I then drill fitting holes on both ends of the pcb, screw the spacers to the pcb and rivet the other end to the enclosure.

 
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Valves-R-Us

Member
Messages
212
Okay, whats the heavy wrinkle finish on the enclosure? Looks industrial and killer! Thinking some powder coat thing? Never have seen any spray products get that gnarly. Nice, clean look.
 

Hawkmoon269

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,399
I build Veroboard pedals. It's a fun hobby. I build them for myself and friends, but I don't charge money. There are lots of designs of pedals available:


 

jlo

Member
Messages
280
I don't build with the intend to sell, but I've sold pedals to friends and others when they approached me. I've also done some custom work in the past, but I rarely do it these days, because the revenue is just too small for me as a hobbyist to make it worthwile. Regarding your second question, I have nothing innovative to offer. I just like tidy and neat looking gutshots.

Thanks! I use small pcb spacers, which come in various forms and sizes. They have a small thread inside (I usually use M3 sized screws). I then drill fitting holes on both ends of the pcb, screw the spacers to the pcb and rivet the other end to the enclosure.

Sure beats the double sided foam tape Ive been using. But it goes with my sloppy wiring and unfinished enclosures. Where do you get the rivets?
 
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3,010
Sure beats the double sided foam tape Ive been using. But it goes with my sloppy wiring and unfinished enclosures. Where do you get the rivets?
They are called blind rivets or "pop" rivets. You will need a special tool to use them, but you should get one for a few bucks in any hardware store (I got mine from Amazon years ago and paid around 15$). It looks like this, but is available in a variety of different shapes and sizes:
 
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lefort_1

Nuzzled Firmly Betwixt
Platinum Supporting Member
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14,935
I do some design stuff, mostly in my head, but a few are in schematic-capture and I'll eventually lay them out using EAGLE PCB.
... for fun, not profit ... I have other skills I use for income these days.

I USED to be on the development team at Mentor Graphics Boardstation Layout products group, doing the QA (unit and end-user) for their hispeed layout analysis product back in the 90's.
I've laid out 'a few' boards. (as in, a few hundred).
Since I don't want to do coding any more, I prefer to work on my own bizarro variations on analog pedals.
I used to dream that I'd sell the designs to some established pedal-maker, but that's prolly never gonna happen.

... analog... don't get me wrong, I don't mind digital stuff, and digital layouts with tons of DRC/timing constraints were kinda my jam, bitd.
I've posted this pic a hundred times here, but it kinda shows the top-end of my design involvement.... 8 signal layers, 4 power/gnd planes, microstrip and strip line rules apply, 121 pin semicustom PGAs...
Made this while in Mentor's defunct Hardware Engineering Dept... part of the Hardware Modeling Library (HML).
 

walldot

Member
Messages
76
I have a few PCBs and components coming in soon. I have done plenty of audio electronics projects and repairs before (I built an unreasonable number of theremins for example), and intend to eventually build my own guitar preamp (thinking high voltage solid state, contemplating p2p/turret board for style). Going to get started by building and modding a few “amp in a box” pedals and be taking it from there.

The amount of information out there today is amazing. Back in my youth I tried (and failed at) building a no coil op amp Wah pedal based on a schematic I had photocopied from a library book. Now I have all kinds of classic amp schematics at my fingertips, countless pedal PCBs and software and data sheets to simulate tubes via JFET/MOSFET.
 
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fuzz guy

Member
Messages
479
I've built several kits, and modified a few of the circuits to suit my taste. I haven't gotten into etching or trying to design any of my own stuff on a breadboard, but it might happen one day. I have sold one pedal, but only because it ended up being something I just didn't use very much.
 

bean

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,049
I've been doing it for a little over 15 years and it's still fun. Luckily DIY is currently in the best state it has ever been (except for the some supply chain difficulties due to COVID in the last few months). Things might be different in another 15 years though. I kinda expect we'll see more through-hole parts become less available (that's been the trend for the last few years). But, we are still a ways away from that.

I've been on the other side too: designing for commercial production. DIY remains the most rewarding pursuit.
 

arpegadream

Member
Messages
574
I haven't made a pedal yet. My brother in law is doing some experiments and research.

I took electronics in college but my work afterwards involved Optics mostly, another area I studied.

It would be good to get back into it, but it has been decades. My brother in law and I will talk for several minutes a day about circuits and he helps me remember some things I've learned.
 




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