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Who uses tremolo?

KGWagner

Member
Messages
3,243
In all the years I've listened to music, I think I've heard the tremolo effect used once, on Tommy James and the Shondells' "Crimson and Clover". Yet, it's designed right into a lot of amplifiers, especially Fender's. Volume and tone controls are understandable, maybe even reverb, but why go to all the trouble and expense to include a special effect that almost nobody uses? I would say I've just been listening to the wrong music, but I'm 50 years old. I've heard one helluva lot a music over the years, a lot of it in styles I wouldn't listen to, given a choice. Seems like a lot more people would have appreciated a bottle opener bolted to the side of the amp <grin>
http://www.harpoonbrewery.com/harpoon/product/image/image_bottleopener1.jpg
 

nmiller

Drowning in lap steels
Messages
7,451
It's all over recordings by CCR, Bo Diddley, the Everly Bothers (usually played by Chet Atkins), The Hollies, and lots of other '50s and '60s musicians. It became a lot less popular after that, probably since people started cranking their equipment and the effect is less noticable through a heavily distorted amp.
 

Terry Hayes

Member
Messages
3,217
Some Stone's songs have trem. CCR too.
Yes, I always think of Born On The Bayou. Lots of classic songs used tremolo:

Wichita Lineman
For What It's Worth
Money

Its all over ZZ Top's Rhythmeen album, Breathe (Faith Hill), James Taylor's remake of Summertime Blues, etc.
 

Dave

Member
Messages
3,547
You'll hear it on Radiohead albums. It's all over Plant/Krauss Raising Sand. Tom Waits, Chris Isaac, Gomez, Ani DiFranco, Pink Floyd...I hear it a lot, I'd say it's a pretty popular effect.
 

lonejackrd

Member
Messages
111
When it is subtle and used right, it should not hit you in the face. It can add a very nice almost imperceptible feel. You probably hear it a lot more than you "hear it".
 

ggwwbb

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
5,794
Warren Haynes uses it alot.

I've got two trem pedals and my Fender Pro Reverb has it. I use it pretty regularly.
 

hammersig

Member
Messages
1,419
Obviously there's many songs that use it to great effect, and I'd heard a lot of them, but the song that made me go buy one is After Dark by Tito and the Turantulas from the From Dusk to Dawn soundtrack. Great eery tone that sounds so Billy Gibbons!
 

shallbe

Deputy Plankspanker
Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
12,202
I use it a lot. For instance, sometimes just on the chords of the chorus of a song. I also like to solo with it as well. Often, I kick it on for the final chord of a ballad and let it shimmer to silence. Tremelo cna create a nice mood.

Crimson and Clover is over the top---that is not a good representation of the flexibility and textures you can add with tremelo. Like anything, it is something you learn to use if you are interested.

I'm a trem junkie, and find it very inspiring.
 

KGWagner

Member
Messages
3,243
You probably hear it a lot more than you "hear it".
Apparently so, judging by the responses here. Still, it doesn't seem like it's such an ubiquitous effect that you'd include it in an amp design, like reverb. I'd still rather have a bottle opener or a cigarette lighter <grin>
 

James BCM

Member
Messages
727
I'd leave Tremolo to Warren Haynes. He is the only modern player that knows how to use it without having a tone covered up with it.

For me, my next 65 Amps Lil Elvis combo will have it REMOVED, and a defeated master installed in its place.

LB
BCM
 

sega

Member
Messages
512
In all the years I've listened to music, I think I've heard the tremolo effect used once, on Tommy James and the Shondells' "Crimson and Clover". Yet, it's designed right into a lot of amplifiers, especially Fender's. Volume and tone controls are understandable, maybe even reverb, but why go to all the trouble and expense to include a special effect that almost nobody uses? I would say I've just been listening to the wrong music, but I'm 50 years old. I've heard one helluva lot a music over the years, a lot of it in styles I wouldn't listen to, given a choice. Seems like a lot more people would have appreciated a bottle opener bolted to the side of the amp <grin>



I know where your getting at.
But if you remember, those Fender amps were made back in the days where effects were not commercialized, and not even made, so they used that effect and Reverb, and believe me they used it a lot.

Nowadays efects are commun, and they can easely use it on some amps, even Fender use them.

But there will always be a stock amp with reverb and vibrato.That's the way you can play a lots of great song without emptying your pockets.

Long live those great stock amps.
 

KGWagner

Member
Messages
3,243
That's true - there weren't many floor pedals back in the days the Fender amps were coming of age. Almost none, in fact, other than the occasional volume pedal for the pedal steel players.

When I was a young engineer fresh out of school, though, the only good thing about built-in tremolo was it gave you a pre-wired tube socket and a couple pots already drilled and mounted in the chassis so you could mod the amp by simply rewiring a few things, adding a stage of gain or a master volume, since that was something most of those old Fenders didn't come with.
 

Whats4dessert

Member
Messages
772
If you're in an "oldies" band like I am, it's essential. As previously posted, it's on a lot of the Everly Brothers tunes and it adds that nice flavor to any of the "ice cream" (C-Am-F-G) standards. Listen to Roy Orbison's "Pretty Woman" and try to picture the bridge without the tremolo.......
 

bobcs71

Member
Messages
5,564
In addition to the others mentioned, Ry Cooder uses it - often on soundtracks.

I use it at times for clean solo's to help change things up for the audience's ear.
 




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