Who were the real modern blues innovators?

Discussion in 'The Sound Hound Lounge' started by The Interceptor, Jul 11, 2019.

  1. John Thigpen

    John Thigpen Member

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    I think of EVH as an animal noises guitarist more than a blues guitarist.
     
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  2. sahhas

    sahhas Supporting Member

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    And voodoo Chile!!! It’s like space blues!!!!

     
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  3. mobius

    mobius Member

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    >> Joe Bonamassa


    :hide:mob
     
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  4. MkIII Renegade

    MkIII Renegade Member

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    Pagey stole from the old blues masters, but he took it places they never dreamed of with some help from the boys.

    Another favorite for me is Hendrix with Band of Gypsies. Love the vocals and drumming by Buddy Miles! They don't know.....like I know...da dada dada doo doo dada da..DAAA da da dada....:dude
     
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  5. MkIII Renegade

    MkIII Renegade Member

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    Permaban!!!

    :nono :nono :nono :nono :nono
     
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  6. tapeworm

    tapeworm Member

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    Early BB King as well. Though both he and Freddie are usually associated with the ES-3XX guitars. But man those guys sounded so good on those old Goldtops too! Only difference was they were playing p90s where as Bloomfield and the Brits were known for playing humbuckers.
     
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  7. twotone

    twotone Member

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    Bloomfield, Clapton, and Vaughan. I don't think of them as true blues players, but they made blues more 'cool' to play among rock 'n' rollers.
     
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  8. Trickyrick85

    Trickyrick85 Member

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    Clapton certainly would belong on this list but not purely for his playing. I believe his tone has much to do with it and was extremely influential at the time.
    David Gilmore style of playing has deep roots in the blues. Consider Another Brick in the Wall and its variants, not quite a traditional blues progression but not to dissimilar upon deconstruction. While I couldn't call Gilmour a strict blues player, he has certainly influenced my approach to phrasing, and to an even greater extent, bending within the style of the blues.
    Perhaps a more divisive guitarist, Carlos Santana, should also be considered. Again, I wouldn't consider him a pure blues guitarist, but he certainly innovated the style by incorporating strong Latin influences. His tone and phrasing are unmistakable and still often emulated. His interpretation of Black Magic Woman, a blues song, is without a doubt the most widely known and how I came to know of early Fleetwood Mac and the genius of Peter Green, who should also be included in this lineup.
     
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  9. Sweetfinger

    Sweetfinger Supporting Member

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    I don't think you have to step "outside" the genre to innovate, but it is one way to do it.
    Not necessarily. "Hot For Teacher" is a boogie. The Eurythmics did a cover of "Wrap It Up" before the T-Birds. Is it soul? New Wave? Whitesnake did a straight up cover of Bobby Blue Bland's "Ain't No Love In The Heart Of The City". Is it soul when Bobby did it and hard rock/metal when Coverdale sings it?
    "If I Could Only Flag Her Down" from ZZ Top's Eliminator album is a Texas shuffle, and wouldn't be out of place on an early T-Birds album. Is it rock? Blues?
    Here's a boogie, unless you have something better to call it:


    and one that's a "blues" in my book:



    I may be getting off topic with that. Who has innovated within the blues genre?
    Kid Ramos has developed an identifiable style. He takes "normal" blues chords and shifts them around in ways no other players have done. He's got a hard driving style at times that's quite rockin', powerful, and not at all reminiscent of SRV, Page, and the other usual suspects.
    I'd put Junior Watson in there. He's creative in surprising, yet simple ways.
    Rick Holmstrom's "Hydraulic Groove" disc puts him at the top. It's one of the most interesting things the "blues" has had happen to it in decades.
    Gordie Johnson and Big Sugar.
    Johnny Winter
    Billy Gibbons
    SRV
    JLV, along with the Fabulous T-Birds took obscure songs and melded Texas and Louisiana with BB King and Little Walter, synthesizing a new kind of sound that they pretty much owned. Heck, Jimmie's steel guitar playing is like nothing else.
    Alvin Lee
    Chris Whitley
    Ry Cooder
    Mike Henderson. Listen to that first Bluebloods disc and tell me you've heard that before.
    G Love
    The Red Devils and their successors, the 44s. Those bands stayed within the traditional boundaries, but also have a style and sound that is quite distinctive, that you can't really say, "here, I've heard that before".
    Not a guitar player, but Jason Ricci has taken the form and his instrument, harmonica, a definite step forward.
    Some of these artists aren't considered primarily "blues" but I think they are worth mentioning. One is Ritchie Blackmore. Have a listen to "Lazy". That's definitely a blues, but also out there in terms of approach.
    Another is Doyle Bramhall II. He can certainly play the blues as authentically as anyone. He does a mighty fine Jimmy Reed style harmonica, but applying the blues to what he does makes him an innovator, and within a genre so wide as to encompass everything from Gatemouth Brown to Cedell Davis, Son House to Little Charlie Baty, Robert Johnson to George Thorogood to Josh Smith and Kirk Fletcher, I think most I've listed can be included.
    Last, I'm going to add Nick Curran. He popped up sounding like the last 40 years of musical innovation and style had never happened, but didn't sound like your usual throwback act, simply going through the motions and re-creating the past. It was fresh, alive, and surpassed in many cases, the players of the by-gone era. There's something to be said for "innovating" within a genre, by going deep into its roots and putting those roots out as a complete main musical course, with as much, or more fire and life as it had decades before.
     
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  10. marvin cobain

    marvin cobain Member

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    Wayne Shorter
    Joe Henderson
    Charles Mingus
    Captain Beefheart
    Tom Waits
    Jimi Hendrix
    Morphine
    Nick Cave
    Carla Bley
    Andrew Hill (when he played the blues)
    Don Ellis
    Miles Davis
    John Coltrane
    Gerald Wilson
    John Carisi
    Don Grolnick

    etc

    Basically, to me the true blues innovators were mostly jazz musicians doing sophisticated things with the blues form and certain experimental rock musicians. While the blues rock guys (Johnny Winter, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Eric Clapton etc) to me are mostly conservatives and their influence explains why a lot of people thinks that you can't innovate the genre, and the huge amount of imitators that didn't added a lot to the genre.
     
  11. mobius

    mobius Member

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    Agree with @marvin cobain.

    All the jazz boppers who created the jazz form of the 12 bar blues:

    [​IMG]
     
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  12. FuzzyAce

    FuzzyAce Member

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    SRV most certainly was an innovator, mainly because he not only appealed to a mainstream rock/pop audience but also to Blues greats and contemporaries of the time. They saw the fire and passion in his delivery. You could see in his later writing too, he was evolving yet still maintaining those roots. And being a certain color should not have anything to do with it either. Blues like any other genre sprung out of what came before it, all kinds of ethnicities.
     
  13. PosterBoy

    PosterBoy Member

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    I'd put Chris Whitley forward
     
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  14. macula56

    macula56 Member

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    innovation
    noun
    in·no·va·tion | \ ˌi-nə-ˈvā-shən \
    1 : the introduction of something new
    2 : a new idea, method, or device : novelty
     
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  15. FlyingVBlues

    FlyingVBlues Gold Supporting Member

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    The Paul Butterfield Blues Band’s East-West album was very innovative. It combined traditional Chicago blues, Indian raga influences and some of the earliest jazz-fusion in the Work Song and especially East-West.
     
  16. mikebat

    mikebat Member

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    anyone who lists an artist that recorded their prime music 40 years ago needs has a different definition of the word "modern" that I do.

    In the end....I think innovating blues is a double edged sword, there is so much great stuff that to build on, it moves people in the most primal way, and at the same time....blues, like Gibson, like Harley like Coca Cola, has purists that get upset the moment you step one foot outside what THEY believe the proper formula to that idiom is.
     
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  17. sahhas

    sahhas Supporting Member

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    I know most will find this sacrilege: but I think most rap music is just modern blues. A lot of it is about the urban experience. A lot of it is rhythm and vocal... the sampling of random noises, found sounds as replaced the “EVH animal noises”... but the structure is the same
     
  18. tapeworm

    tapeworm Member

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    Good post and while I agree with a lot of it, I disagree with a lot of it as well. But, man we’d be here all day debating this if I reply in depth to your post and likely not come to any agreement. Nice to see Junior Watson and Kid Ramos get mentioned in a thread about blues outside of the West Coast Blues thread, though. :aok
     
  19. sahhas

    sahhas Supporting Member

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    the other one I will say is the White Stripes, I always thought their music was pretty much modern blues....
     
  20. marvin cobain

    marvin cobain Member

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    having fire and passion or appealing to a mainstream pop audience does not have anything to do with musical innovation.
     
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