Who were the real modern blues innovators?

Discussion in 'The Sound Hound Lounge' started by The Interceptor, Jul 11, 2019.

  1. Doomrider78

    Doomrider78 Member

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    ...and this was the point I was making earlier, that within genres that have quite [fan-imposed] restrictive defining characteristics, in order to innovate i.e. find new sounds and methods of expression, you have to step outside of the genre, which is where the likes of Black Sabbath, Led Zeppelin, Metallica, Public Enemy, Moby, Dave Gilmour, Cantrell et al come in. However, if you loosen up the restrictions on a genre, then there is much greater room for innovation, and therefore many more examples of musicians who have innovated whilst using the blues as their starting point.

    The problem here is not the musicians, it's the fans.

    For the record, I am referring to modern/contemporary blues, so after the ground rules for the blues as we know it today were laid.
     
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  2. Wrubird

    Wrubird Member

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  3. toomanyamps

    toomanyamps Member

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    Absolutely correct.
    Beano was recorded only 30 years after Robert Johnson's recordings.
    Beano was recorded over 50 years ago.
    Quite a stretch to call it "modern".
     
  4. The Interceptor

    The Interceptor Member

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    Modern is what the OP says it is

    Seriously, in the history of the blues, I'd reckon 50 years in relatively modern.
     
  5. Spider Mark

    Spider Mark Member

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  6. StompBoxBlues

    StompBoxBlues Member

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    I have actually posted but I, and apparently many, are a little unclear about th concept. In what confines? In what limits?

    Blues, actual blues, not just copycat playing (though everyone does that at the start) is by nature innovative. I heard you all laugh, but it is.

    Taking a couple of scales, and often (though not all means always) a couple different chord progressions, The whole point is to express. If it were generic we wouldn’t be able to pick out BB King, Albert King, from each other, etc.

    As for the modern part. Modern blues changed a good bit by extended solos, etc. it was always there sometimes, but not nearly as much. Blues, old blues was often great tones, band interaction, guitar that sounds like it is talking, but not so much guitar hero’s....it was more the whole thing.

    When English groups started playing, it seemed like they often rushed, and missed the actual groove. And the vocals were not anywhere near as good as the old masters. I’m generalizing, so I’m automatically wrong and can be rebutted by an example or two, but in general I think this.

    I’ve never seen anyone own and Bring in the crowd, make them so focused on him as BB King in Chicago in the early seventies. Close second, Buddy Guy in Norway in like 1993, also which surprised me, Elvin Bishop with a horn section and I’ve tried to find music by him that was like that and never have.

    But i mean there is and has been innovation all over the place from when blues started. Modern is just now. Which also runs the gamut. Has anyone mentioned Roy Buchanan yet? I know for me Derek Trucks and Warren Haynes are also amazing, surprising and innovative and blues based.
    There are so many...
     
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  7. mad dog

    mad dog Silver Supporting Member

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    "Modern" could be a large range. For me, these guys stand out in the last couple decades, for pushing blues feel into some unusual sounds, areas:

    • RL Burnside, for his humor, acceptance of new things, new sounds
    • Rik Holmstrom, for his adventurous instrumental, somehow bluesy as hell no matter where he goes with it.

    Junior Kimbrough comes to mind too, in that he takes raw drone quite far. So simple and severe, some of his tunes seem to turn inside out.
     
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  8. freedom's door

    freedom's door Member

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  9. jpastras

    jpastras Supporting Member

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    Chris Whitley - the deepest songwriter of new blues in 50 years. Superhuman talent.

    Rick Holmstrom - a beast

    Jimmie Dawkins

    Shuggie Otis

    Hubert Sumlin (listen to his solo stuff)

    Robert Quine (he is the modernization of Hubert Sumlin)

    Tom Waits - most of it is blues

    Bob Dylan - lots of blues, and he cannot be touched when it comes to advancing blues lyrical tradition

    Hounddog (the band w/ David Hidalgo)

    John Lee Ziegler - the coolest

    Dan Auerbach

    Albert King was unquestionably an innovator, especially in style and through collaborations with the Stax producers

    Syl Johnson was an innovative songwriter and lyricist, and songs like “Is It Because I’m Black?” Are heart wrenching social commentary.

    Sean Costello proved on his final two albums that he had blues songwriting game that was more advanced than anybody working today. The world probably wasn’t looking for it in this decade, but had he been doing this in the 90’s he would have created A blues resurgence the way Robert Cray did in the 80s.

    Off a little more on rock work are very excellent players/writers like Marcus King.
     
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  10. martyman

    martyman Member

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    Anyone excluding "blues rock" ever stop to think that "blues rock" IS an innovation?
     
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  11. Bluzeboy

    Bluzeboy Member

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    It’s out there..

     
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  12. StompBoxBlues

    StompBoxBlues Member

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    Yes, like that. Are these one offs on otherwise studio albums or the whole albums like that?
     
  13. Bluzeboy

    Bluzeboy Member

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    Try out “Ace in the Hole”..
     
  14. dlguitar64

    dlguitar64 Member

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    Leaving aside Blues-Rock which is its own thing, I would say Albert King's
    Stax records utilizing top R and B session players was the last significant evolution of the form.
     
  15. biffoz

    biffoz Member

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    I love older, pre-Pigboy Crabshaw Elvin Bishop. Often saw him with Hammond, drums, bass and he was an amazing, straight up blues player. Killer slide player too.

    @jpastras: Surprised Chris Whitley is so often overlooked.
     

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