Who's building tomorrow's collectable guitars right now?

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by 316guitars, Aug 8, 2015.

POLL QUESTION: Who is building guitars today that will be the collectable guitars of tomorrow?

Poll closed Aug 15, 2015.
  1. Suhr

    62 vote(s)
    41.3%
  2. Tom Anderson

    18 vote(s)
    12.0%
  3. James Tyler

    27 vote(s)
    18.0%
  4. Sadowsky

    9 vote(s)
    6.0%
  5. Melancon

    8 vote(s)
    5.3%
  6. Grosh

    20 vote(s)
    13.3%
  7. Mike Lipe

    1 vote(s)
    0.7%
  8. Warrior

    5 vote(s)
    3.3%
  1. Fatty McAtty

    Fatty McAtty Member

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    Suhr isn't exactly a rare branding anymore and John's history with Fender kinda puts him even more out front to me.

    I'm surprised to not see G&L or Heritage on the list, as those cats already had a rich history starting on day 1.
     
  2. Sirloin

    Sirloin Supporting Member

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  3. Tim Plains

    Tim Plains Member

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    None of the above unless some big names start playing them and the guitars become a part of their image just like Page/Slash with Les Pauls. Having said that, I don't like to think of Dan's guitars as collectibles but he is the one small builder I can see this happening to. His guitars have a great (deserved) reputation, most sell quickly when they go up for sale and at or near the cost of new.

    There very will be, and better, who knows, but look at MAX replica Les Pauls. You can buy a newer / way more accurate / better replica but MAXs still command a premium.

    I agree except in my opinion Dan's guitars are not relics.
    Relics = fake looking and terrible.
    Danocasters = guitars that look like they have aged naturally.
     
  4. Raymond Lin

    Raymond Lin Member

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    "Looks like" but they are not actually aged from authentic use with time and gigs.

    They will never be in the same level as original Fender that ages naturally.

    So in 25 years, would you buy a 25 years old fender that ages naturally or a Danocaster that looks probably about the same.

    The reality is Fender is still much more well known than Danocaster. Outside the bubble, more people don't know what Danocaster is.

    I have a Palir Model T....hands up whose heard of it or seen one?

    I took it for a set up to a tech who made Tommy Lommi's guitar, they made a comment that is the nicest neck they've ever played and asked me who had made it. We (TGP) exists in a bubble, and there will be other builders like Dan out there.
     
  5. SPROING!

    SPROING! Member

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    Yes, he's unusual. But then, kids aren't generally collectors of much of anything. They have no money and nowhere to store things. Lol.

    And popular music is not the main influencer of youth now. The phenomenon of garage bands and rock stars was unique to one generation. We probably won't see it again.
    For hundreds of years, musicians were either travelers who sang for their supper or they had sponsors. Rich musicians were unheard of in years passed. That's where we're headed again.
     
  6. dayn

    dayn Supporting Member

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    Like Dumble's?
     
  7. Defendant

    Defendant Member

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    Yarons will due to rarity. As will Gustavvsons.

    I think Fanos have an excellent chance of becoming very collectable. Excellent guitars, lots of variety.
     
  8. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Member

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    hmm......someone say I'm dead or something??o_O




    cheers,
     
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  9. lespaulnmarshall

    lespaulnmarshall Member

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    I'm thinking perhaps collings or PRS, but probably only slightly.
    I think it's more like vintage jazzmasters, late 60's teles etc.. that will increase in value in the future. Basically the 'cheaper' part of today's vintage market.
     
  10. Bluedawg

    Bluedawg Member

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    They will all be collectable ...... to somebody .... whether any of them will be worth any money is another question


    I think the old classics from the 1920s through the early 60s will be the ones that maintain some value ... although maybe not anything like they were 10 years ago

    And there will certainly be a few surprises in what is considered valuable in the future


    But there will always be enough guitar players around to build collections .... but there may not be enough to drive up the prices the way the baby boomers did

    Future collectors may be able to build nice collections of Suhr, Collings, Benedettos, Campellones, Danocasters, etc. ... and even more recent Gibsons and Fenders without having to pay out that much cash

    :munch
     
    Guitarwiz007 likes this.
  11. Guitarworks

    Guitarworks Member

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    It's impossible to predict. While all of the brands you listed produce quality instruments that are popular and coveted among guitarists, they don't have the history, brand recognition, famous player recognition and mass-produced numbers necessary to make them enough of a household name to appeal to someone with money who doesn't play/plays very little that has no interest in anything other than 'feeling cool' because they own one. I don't foresee any of those being particularly collectable - there's nothing about them that screams 'famous with mass appeal'.

    If the question that's REALLY being asked here is: "What besides Gibson, Rickenbacker and Fender will be as collectable tomorrow as Gibson, Rickenbacker and Fender are today?" Then I suppose my guesses as to what might have a vague chance of accomplishing this feat are PRS, Heritage, Hamer and possibly Dean.
     
  12. trickness

    trickness Analog with a side of DSP

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    None of the above. They all make too many.

    MAYBE Gustavsson, D'Pergo, Stevens.
     
  13. Sirloin

    Sirloin Supporting Member

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    No way! Just said if you stopped building for some reason.
     
  14. Raymond Lin

    Raymond Lin Member

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    Only certain PRS. The ones that Paul made back in his garage, yes, they already fetches quite a tidy sum of money.

    The others? Not even Private Stock holds their value even though each one is unique, one of a kind. The existence of the PCT means someone could spec out another guitar exactly the same way.

    Some prototypes might, especially if said model becomes a big hit.

    Your regular 10-top Custom 24 will never be that collectible though, there are just too many of them, and they are so consistently good too.

    The only way it will go up is if PRS does a Gibson, as in when Paul passes on the torch to someone else to be CEO, like Ted McCarty passes on and then company goes to crap, then we will realise what great guitars PRS have been making all along and who today's used PRS prices are absolute steal!
     
  15. Whitecat

    Whitecat Member

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    I would think that there are PRS *components* that have already achieved a rarity/desirability/collectability factor moreso than actual guitars.

    Original Sweet Switches, stamped T+B & 53/10 pickups, etc...
     
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  16. lespaulnmarshall

    lespaulnmarshall Member

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    Well all of the above would be over quite a long amount of time though.
    Nobody can really predict it though obviously, we can only guess
     
  17. SciFlyer

    SciFlyer Supporting Member

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    I feel the same way. It's a weird time for people trying to make a living playing music.
     
  18. Guitarwiz007

    Guitarwiz007 Silver Supporting Member

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    Leo sold his company too.
     
  19. +3kk!

    +3kk! Member

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    i agree with you, but i dont think its those that paul made in his garage , i think the one that would hold up is the Cu24/ Cu 22. sure it sounds like a lot today but they are the most popular PRS in the PRS line, so it has the highest chance for a big name to pick it up and turn it into the next big thing.

    moreover while PRS does seem common, its actually quite rare teh world over, so given after a population increase here and there and a shortage of certain woods (like flamed maple top) it might just reach it

    but i do also agree that what really needs to happen first is PRS does a Gibson or Fender where the company just goes to the dump.

    but as it stands they seem only to improve over their guitars, so its kinda hard to have any value over the older ones
     
  20. Jahn

    Jahn Listens to Johnny Marr, plays like John Denver Supporting Member

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    OH.

    I got one.

    The custom shop Gretsches that are made in the USA by Stephen Stern.

    Added bonus for ones that have hardcore rockabilly provenance, like being played onstage by Brian Setzer.

    Rockabilly is a real thing and someone out there a hundred years from now is going to want to jam on one of those axes.
     

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