• Please use the follwoing thread to discuss any bugs, issues, or feature requests related to the forum software upgrade.

    Click here for Thread

     


Why 2 mic's on vocals, 70's content.

rob2001

Member
I've watched a lot of old concerts they roll on VH-1 Classic, Skynard, Hendrix, and countless others, and many ran two mic's taped together on live shows. Why? Are they tring to mimic a double tracked vocal? Maybe one has a delay on it? Or maybe it produced phase issues that some guys thought were cool? Thoughts?
 

greatbigz

Member
not sure about that, but I was watching a recent Doobie Brothers concert and they had some device on top of their mic's. Couldn't tell what it was. Your question sparked my memory to ask that question.

Nevermind. I just googled it and found that it is an Optical Mic Mute. If you are in front of the mic, you can sing. As soon as you move away, the mic mutes.
 

rhinocaster

Supporting Member
It was my understanding that PA systems were not really up to the task, so they ended up using several mics and several PA amps to get the voice loud enough.
 
FOH = Front of House.

One mic was for the PA (FOH) and the other was sent to the recording truck.
That way the recording guys could have a separate mix from the PA guys.
 
It was my understanding that PA systems were not really up to the task, so they ended up using several mics and several PA amps to get the voice loud enough.
If that were the case they could run the multiple amps with one mic...the other posters have it pegged I believe.
 

bigroy

Member
It was before the days of splitters and multiple send consoles. I had to provide a feed for TV/Radio off of a stage mic during a late 70's political rally. They asked me for 8 different feeds :eek:

Today you could do it with a Mackie 1604....
 

jscorno

Member
There are actually 2 reasons. The first as previously mentioned was the PA's splitter system (or grounding scheme for that matter) couldn't accommodate the need to an addition split for a recording or broadcast. Thus there was 1 mic for recording and one 1 for the PA.

The second reason for 2 vocal microphones were where the diaphragms of the 2 mics were separated physically to help eliminate feedback. This technique was called Differential Miking. The slightly offset placement of the diaphragms caused audio sources that were not close to cancel out (like stage monitors or the Grateful Dead's Wall of Sound) but it allowed a proximate sound source (like the vocalist) to be captured.

The Grateful Dead were the chief experimenters in this technique. Here's a link to the Grateful Dead Wall Of Sound. Scroll down to the second paragraph under microphones...
http://dozin.com/wallofsound/index.html

Today you can buy a vocal mic with 2 diaphragms in one where the diaphragms are slightly offset (Crown makes one called the Differoid: http://www.pdfdownload.org/pdf2html...crownaudio.com/pdf/mics/136368.pdf&images=yes)

Hope this helps...
 

Tonefish

Member
There are actually 2 reasons. The first as previously mentioned was the PA's splitter system (or grounding scheme for that matter) couldn't accommodate the need to an addition split for a recording or broadcast. Thus there was 1 mic for recording and one 1 for the PA.

The second reason for 2 vocal microphones were where the diaphragms of the 2 mics were separated physically to help eliminate feedback. This technique was called Differential Miking. The slightly offset placement of the diaphragms caused audio sources that were not close to cancel out (like stage monitors or the Grateful Dead's Wall of Sound) but it allowed a proximate sound source (like the vocalist) to be captured.

The Grateful Dead were the chief experimenters in this technique. Here's a link to the Grateful Dead Wall Of Sound. Scroll down to the second paragraph under microphones...
http://dozin.com/wallofsound/index.html

Today you can buy a vocal mic with 2 diaphragms in one where the diaphragms are slightly offset (Crown makes one called the Differoid: http://www.pdfdownload.org/pdf2html...crownaudio.com/pdf/mics/136368.pdf&images=yes)

Hope this helps...
Very interesting and a very nice effect.

rob2001, was one mic about 2 and a half inches behind the other?
 

jscorno

Member
...I was watching a recent Doobie Brothers concert and they had some device on top of their mic's. Couldn't tell what it was. Your question sparked my memory to ask that question.

Nevermind. I just googled it and found that it is an Optical Mic Mute. If you are in front of the mic, you can sing. As soon as you move away, the mic mutes.
This is a great technique for keeping the backline (read: guitar amps) and drums out of the vocal mics when the vocalist moves away from the mic. Very helpful for anyone using in-ear monitors. It also keeps the front-of-house mixer from having to ride and mute the vocal mics constantly to keep the stage sound out of the vocal mix.

Before Optical Mic Mute, folks used to use alarm mats in front of vocal mics to accomplish this. The stepping on the mat would trigger a noise gate on the vocal channel, opening the mic. When the sing stepped off the mat, the noise gate would shut off or turn down the mic . Obviously this only really worked for vocal mics that were in a stationary position.
 

rob2001

Member
Very interesting and a very nice effect.

rob2001, was one mic about 2 and a half inches behind the other?

I'm not sure how far apart they were but they were offset. I'll have to watch for those shows again. IIRC, in the Skynard one, two different mic's were used. And all of the vocals employed it. Sure looks ugly though! Duct tape all over the mic's!

Thanks for all your enlightening responses!
 


Trending Topics

Top