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Why are Taylors called the acoustic for the electric player?

6789

Member
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2,857
Why are Taylors called the acoustic for the electric player?

Any explanation?

thanks!
 

Fishermike

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
88
Low action from the factory is a big part of it.

A lot of people just don’t understand that a good setup has everything to do with the feel and “playability” of a guitar. So many acoustics come from the factory with a high action, so people think they’re hard to play. Most of the time, they really just need a good setup that suits the player.
 

davess23

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
6,390
Having owned a couple of Taylors, I'd say a lot of it is the neck, which is shaped and radiused to feel and play a lot like an electric guitar neck. There's more to it than that, though. The Taylors I owned, as well as others I've tried, just have a vibe to them that makes me feel as if I'm playing an electric. It's a feeling about the whole guitar and it goes beyond the neck. I wish I could explain it better, but it's there.

It's also part of the reason I'm not a Taylor guy. Yes, I play lots of electric, too, but I don't want my acoustic guitars to make me feel like it. Good instruments, but just not for me.
 

Tony Done

Member
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5,742
I've read that they got their first toehold in the market because the neck profile appealed to electric guitarists. I;ve read similar things about Ovation, but I think it was more likely the pickup system in their case.
 

Mr Fingers

Member
Messages
2,500
Yup, that's the buzz. Neck feels like an electric. Also, Taylor went big-time into getting bands to use their guitars live (and plugged in) so that seem rooted in rock at least as much as traditional "acoustic" music.
 

shredtrash

Gold Supporting Member
Silver Supporting Member
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9,756
I think it probably comes down to setup. I've played other acoustics that were setup properly and they played well too. That said, I'm a Taylor guy and their neck profiles and natural brightness suit me well.
 

Tony Done

Member
Messages
5,742
Yup, that's the buzz. Neck feels like an electric. Also, Taylor went big-time into getting bands to use their guitars live (and plugged in) so that seem rooted in rock at least as much as traditional "acoustic" music.
I wondered about endorsement deals, but didn't mention it. Moe recently, I've read stories Taylor equipping talent show contestants.

I like Taylor necks, and their design and construction, but they mostly sound a bit too big and open for my music, folk and country blues.
 

rizla

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
938
just sounds like a marketing catch phrase to me.
I never felt that they were any more electric guitar feeling than most other modern acoustic guitars.
 

Davy

Member
Messages
1,385
They have a 1 3/4" nut and I'd bet a lot of electric players would far prefer 1 11/16". I think it's mainly down to having a nice low action right out the gate and a slimmish neck profile. They're simply great, easy playing acoustics. I don't own one but I sure wouldn't cry if someone gifted me a 512 :)
 

guitararmy

Member
Messages
2,620
When Taylor first hit the stores, I don't recall any other major brands being as easy to play.
I tried an early 810 dreadnought, played like butter!
I should have bought it, but wasn't familiar with the brand.
 

buddyboy69

Member
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4,961
I'm going with neck profile. The Taylor I have feels like an electric. Does not widen out like my other acoustics.
 

TwoHandsTenThumbs

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
1,114
Neck profile, low action (improved by the absence of a body hump, thanks to the NT neck), a tendency for most models to offer factory electronics.
 

Funky Chicken

Member
Messages
4,302
Taylors play “easier” than most other acoustics when you pull them off the wall. A guitarist who starts on electric will have a much easier time getting their playing confidence together on a Taylor than on most other brands. This is especially true of their 12 strings.
 

zombywoof

Member
Messages
4,453
Whether right or wrong I have associated Taylors with both those who wanted the feel of an electric guitar and those playing in worship bands. If you think about it though, Gibson went the same route when they set out to solve the engineering problem of how to make their acoustics feel more like electrics while adding some of the conveniences associated with electric guitars. The result was what they called their low action, fast playing necks in 1960 and then the following year when they made the ADJ saddle bridges standard.
 

Timcito

Member
Messages
10,232
The NT neck on a Taylor is something special. It allows them to create a perfect neck angle to the body, and because it's so easy to re-set, the guitar can have perfect neck angle for life for little time or cost. Now whether we like the Taylor sound is a different matter, but their neck technology is a major selling point they have over such as Martin and Gibson.
 

blaster

Member
Messages
1,188
In the 70’s Ovation necks really appealed to electric players due to their necks. Right after that Taylor utilized that same principle by shaping a neck that suited electric players. I had a Lemon Grove Taylor that had a super thin neck that at the time I liked and sounded big and deep.
As my taste changed over the years and I started liking thicker necks more I sold the Taylor. I’ve had a few Taylors since which had nicer necks (1 3/4 and more thicker) but since then went to Martins due to traditional sound.
As others noted above the key is to have a great set up.
 

Timcito

Member
Messages
10,232
Yup, that's the buzz. Neck feels like an electric. Also, Taylor went big-time into getting bands to use their guitars live (and plugged in) so that seem rooted in rock at least as much as traditional "acoustic" music.
They also seemed to court younger artists than Martin and Gibson, which gave them a more vibrant, relevant aura.
 




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