Why call it "Slip-Stone" ?

Discussion in 'Luthier's Guitar & Bass Technical Discussion' started by Soapbarstrat, Aug 9, 2005.

  1. Soapbarstrat

    Soapbarstrat Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,065
    Joined:
    May 28, 2005
    Stew-Mac has a nut material they call "slip-stone", and right there in the description, it says " made of Delrin".

    If it's Delrin, then why give it another name ?

    Ok, maybe there's a good reason to give it another name :

    To make someone like me think maybe it's some special kind of Delrin, that is hard to get/impossible to get from any other source.

    Anybody know exactly what is is ? Is it just regular Delrin I can get from an industrial supplier or plastics company ?

    Stew-Mac is throwing me off pretty good because :

    They say it's a "new material " (but Delrin has been around a long time)

    Theirs is a cream white color, whereas regular Delrin is more white ? (and regular Delrin also comes in black, which Stew-Mac doesn't have, and you'd think they would have "slip-stone" in black too, if it was available).
     
  2. unclej54

    unclej54 Guest

    you may not have noticed but stewmac has got some pretty good marketing guys on their team. don't get me wrong..nearly all of my repair tools came from stewmac but they've been re-inventing the wheel for a long time.:D
     
  3. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Member

    Messages:
    1,624
    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2003
    Location:
    Raleigh, NC
    Yeah, they're pretty clever over at Stew-Mac. But, truth is, it's almost impossible to find the Delrin rough material in anything but white and black. Slip Stone is probably the best nut for non-sticking strings - even better than a graphite-impregnated nut. Very tough to slot, though. It's so slippery that standard files just pass right through! Even bone nuts are easier to slot!!
     
  4. Saul Koll

    Saul Koll Member

    Messages:
    877
    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2003
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    Slipstone is what they are calling it. Trevor Wilkenson used to call it "Wilkaloid". I sell it as "KOllOID". It is absolutely the best nut material for trem guitars. It is like delrin, but has some super lubricant blended in. I stock standard Delrin, and this stuff, which I get from an industrial plastic supply. This defintely a different animal. And really good.
    Stew Mac knows indeed how to market their stuff, but this is the real deal.
     
  5. Soapbarstrat

    Soapbarstrat Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,065
    Joined:
    May 28, 2005
    How can it be " a different animal" if they say " Slip-stone nuts are made of Delrin" ?

    When I checked out Delrin variations at McMaster-Carr, the Delrin they have with added lubricant only comes in a brown color (it's been several weeks since I looked, so my memory is getting fuzzy about it) .

    The way Stew-Mac sells it is too expensive for me. I already have a good system for making nut blanks from larger sheets/slabs of materials, so I don't want to pay Stew-Mac for doing that part for me.
     
  6. Saul Koll

    Saul Koll Member

    Messages:
    877
    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2003
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    I'm not sure. I have some of each, and they are indeed different. They cut, file sand and polish in a different manner. I don't know what the trade or technical term for it is. Are there variations of "delrin"?
    I bought my sheets as "extra slippery delrin" or something poetic like that. (It has been a while.)
    Regardless,
    If you can source your own and process it, cool, that is what I do!
     
  7. Saul Koll

    Saul Koll Member

    Messages:
    877
    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2003
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    :p

    As you may have noticed, I am a very technically minded person!

    (yeah right.)

    Next time I talk to my supplier, I will ask just what the hell it is he is selling to me!
     
  8. Soapbarstrat

    Soapbarstrat Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,065
    Joined:
    May 28, 2005
    All I know, is that I did work on this Sunn brand strat copy (made in India). While playing it, before doing any work, I did notice the nut looked quite "plasticy", but the open string tones sounded just fine (and I kept thinking " no, the open notes shouldn't sound that acceptable with some cheap plastic nut in there").
    I had to make a new nut (out of Corian), because the spacing of the stock nut was not right (low E way too far in from the edge). I then noticed the stock nut seemed to be "molded" (round indentations on the bottom). It was an "off white" color .Then I started to wonder if it was Delrin or something like that. I then tried to file a new string slot in it , and my file skated all over the place. Only after making a scribe mark with a razor-blade, was I able to file a slot in the same spot where I wanted to. I then noticed how the .010" nut file wouldn't bind at all while filing, and those thin files usually bind often when I use them. Because of all that, I thought "this stuff is THE material for nuts".
    Did google searches for Delrin as nut material, and often saw people said it's too soft. But then I've been aware of Stew-Mac's Delrin slip-stone praised by Sadowsky, and now Saul Koll too.
    I can't imagine Sadowsky buys it from Stew-Mac (perhaps he supplies them with it).

    Rob
     
  9. Marcel

    Marcel Member

    Messages:
    600
    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2005
    Location:
    Opmeer, Netherlands
    Just my 2cents,


    Delrin (or POM) can be made in many different type's, from soft to hard and each can have their own composition. So it is very well possible to make a very slippery kind of Delrin that is also very hard. I use the same hard and slippery kind in my Tremconverter product as for bearings. Fantastic stuff!

    www.dircksons.com
     
  10. Soapbarstrat

    Soapbarstrat Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,065
    Joined:
    May 28, 2005
    Well, at least I don't have to feel bad if I have a nervous breakdown over not being able to nail down what exactly this 'slipstone' stuff is, because it seems the sky is the limit.

    I've taken "plastic bearings" out of old trashed VCRs, that could very well be some kind of very hard delrin. Can't make nuts out of those suckers, though:(
     
  11. roknfnrol

    roknfnrol Silver Supporting Member

    Messages:
    6,220
    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2003
    Location:
    Louisville, KY
    I just got a new nut on my R8 Les Paul a couple weeks ago. The tech told me she'd like to use slipstone instead of bone; I told her to go for it although I didn't know what the heck slipstone was. The guitar feels great and stays in tune great. Much better than before. I'm glad I took her advice.
     
  12. Tinman

    Tinman Member

    Messages:
    1,949
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2005
    Location:
    Rockford, Illinois
    I wonder where she got it.
     
  13. twinrider1

    twinrider1 Member

    Messages:
    12,761
    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2005
    Location:
    Columbus, OH
    About halfway through this thread.....
    Hmmm, thinking to myself, this thread seems familiar somehow.....
    ........
    ........
    2005! DOH!

    IIRC, Delrin may be a base material, but various types and amounts of additives can be included in the mix. Slipstone may not be the same as the base Delrin.
    http://www2.dupont.com/Plastics/en_US/Products/Delrin/Delrin_new.html
     
  14. Soapbarstrat

    Soapbarstrat Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,065
    Joined:
    May 28, 2005
    Haha. I had a run-in with a couple stewmac guys a couple months ago and I think this is one of the threads they were referring to when they said I go around running stewmac down.
     

Share This Page