Why did Gibson change the Flying V bridge?

Discussion in 'Luthier's Guitar & Bass Technical Discussion' started by Vibrator, Feb 25, 2008.

  1. Vibrator

    Vibrator Active Member

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    Does anybody know why Gibson decided to replace the string-thru-back construction of the original '57 Flying V with the stopbar in the '67 reissue? I would think the the string-thru-back would have better sustain, no? Just wondering....
     
  2. mkolesa@mac.com

    mkolesa@mac.com Member

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    just a guess but i would suspect that it was just cheaper to make it with a stop bar if they're already making other guitars that use a stop bar... correct me if i'm wrong, but i don't believe there were any strings-through-the-body gibsons at that time and as such it would have required a different/special set-up from their other guitars (and therefore more expensive)... couple that with the fact that there wasn't the same emphasis on making guitars that were true to their 'historic' roots...
     
  3. Vibrator

    Vibrator Active Member

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    So perhaps it is a production cost issue then...
     
  4. walterw

    walterw Gold Supporting Member

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    personally,i think the string-through has some issues, mainly the overly long and differing lengths of string behind the bridge, and the fact that excess down-angle tends to collapse tune-o-matic bridges.
     
  5. booj

    booj Member

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    I was told by a Gibson rep. at the music store I worked at, that the stop bar/bridge combo was considered supeior for tone and sustain in their solid body guitars. My 335 Pro also has a stop bar and it sounds great.
     

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