Why do Higher Watt Amps Sound BIGGER?

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs' started by NBlair930, Mar 2, 2012.

  1. NBlair930

    NBlair930 Silver Supporting Member

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    This morning i was playing a Bruno UG30 and a Clark Beaufort through a Fusco 1x12 Extension Cab loaded with a Scumnico. Although my playing sucks as always, the tones were glorious to my ears, but I got to thinking........
    Serious Question: In laymans terms can someone please expalin why a 36 Watt amp played through a 1x12 extension cab just sounds so much BIGGER/FULLER than a smaller 18 watt amp through the same 1x12 extension cab? I am not talking about headroom or volume, etc., but rather the perception (or reality) that the larger amp simply soulds so much larger.
     
  2. XmasTree

    XmasTree Member

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    that's just the way it is.
    they say that a 100w Marshall isn't that much louder than a 50w Marshall but the 100w just sounds BIGGER/Fuller/etc

    my guess is the different tube configuration, different tube sizes and differnent Transformer sizes (as well as the circuit as a whole)
     
  3. sharpshooter

    sharpshooter Member

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    The largest factor is the output transformer,,of course the physical area of the metal in the power tubes has some effect,,the pre-amp section, not so much.
     
  4. somedude

    somedude Member

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    Low end takes more power to push than midrange.
     
  5. JubileeMan 2555

    JubileeMan 2555 Member

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    From my understanding,

    it takes exponentionally more power/wattage to reproduce lower freqencies at the same dB level as higher frequencies.

    you can turn the bass knob up on the lower wattage amp, but their just isn't going to be the same amount of power to reproduce the lows.

    I've always toyed with the idea of designing/building a low-wattage guitar amp with a crossover inside that would send low frequencies only to a higher wattage amp. so you can get the volume reduction of low-watts, but the body and BIGGER sound of a large watt amp.
     
  6. FFTT

    FFTT Member

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    amish iron!
     
  7. GT100

    GT100 Member

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    Ever notice that bass amps tend to have way more power...

    Lloyd
     
  8. diagrammatiks

    diagrammatiks Member

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    because they are bigger.
     
  9. ekkybedmond

    ekkybedmond Member

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    Yup, THIS
     
  10. effectsman

    effectsman Supporting Member

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    Cool idea!
     
  11. teemuk

    teemuk Member

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    That concept was perfected ages ago.

    It's called having a bassist in the band.

    :rimshot
     
  12. kingink

    kingink Gold Supporting Member

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    Great idea!
     
  13. kingink

    kingink Gold Supporting Member

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    Oh, and +1.

    I've been looking around at 100 watt amps again, not for volume, just for the fuller sound. I really prefer mid-powered amps through 4 speakers, and I was wondering if more power would mean I'd have to carry around fewer speakers/cabinets.
     

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