Why do they do this???

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by ed84246, Jun 20, 2008.

  1. ed84246

    ed84246 Member

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    I have an ESP George Lynch M-1 Tiger guitar. It's one of their higher end models and is a great guitar in every aspect...except that you have to remove the neck to adjust the truss rod.

    Why, oh why on earth do guitar companies do this - it's not the first one I've seen but usually they're on cheap guitars, not high end models like this one. What purpose could it possibly serve to not have a notch where the neck meets the body so you can access the truss rod with a screwdriver (and to add insult to injury, you can see half the screw, just teasing you enough to know if they'd just cut out a tiny more piece of wood...).

    I've never removed or re-attached a neck before and am concerned I wouldn't get the angle right, or wouldn't fit it snugly enough or overdo it, etc...

    I just don't understand the mindset here at all. Guitar has no relief right now and not alot of sustain. Uggghhhh!
     
  2. 9-Pin

    9-Pin Member

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    Because that's the way Leo did it in the beginning.
     
  3. chucke99

    chucke99 Member

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    "A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds."

    -Ralph Waldo Emerson
     
  4. ed84246

    ed84246 Member

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    That was almost 60 years ago. I think even Leo realized his folly when making later Fenders and G&L's, all of which have adjustable truss rods without moving the neck. ESP, apparently, didn't get the memo...
     
  5. frankencat

    frankencat Guitarded Gold Supporting Member

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  6. buddastrat

    buddastrat Member

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    I like it at the heel, because then I don't screw with it so much as I don't feel like pullin' the neck. All my strats and the tele is like that. I like it that way and just play it as is. Somedays the neck is more relief and it's high, and some days low. It's all good.

    But pullin' the neck is no big deal. It's something you need to learn to do eventually.
     
  7. ROTHNROLL

    ROTHNROLL Member

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    Are you serious?
    Adjusting the Truss rod is very easy to learn and perform.
     
  8. Mark C

    Mark C Member

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    Some feel that the heel adjust has a different tone than a headstock adjust truss rod. As to why there is no access routed into the body, maybe because the neck pickup would be in the way even with a slot routed there?
     
  9. freedom's door

    freedom's door Supporting Member

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    There is no neck pickup on an M1 Tiger.

    I think he should take the guitar to a competent tech, and have a space routed so he can make the adjustments without pulling the neck. That's what i would do if i owned one of those guitars.
     
  10. Gasp100

    Gasp100 Silver Supporting Member

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    I agree with you, but I pull the necks off my guitars frequently while working on them, it's really no big deal. Tune down and loosen the strings, get a capo and capo the strings to the neck. Then just unscrew and remove to do what you need to do (ie. adjust truss rod, install new pickups, etc...)
    How often do you adjust the truss rod? I think a slight turn one way or the other should be sufficient, but YMMV. Also, once you make a changet to the rod it can take hours/days before it really adjusts and settles into it's new space. Subtle, but something to keep in mind.
     
  11. candid_x

    candid_x Supporting Member

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    To me it's a ridiculous short sight to design a modern guitar where you have to either remove the neck, pickguard and/or strings to make a simple truss rod adjustment. It's the reason I've passed on several guitars, including a Robert Cray Strat.
     
  12. candid_x

    candid_x Supporting Member

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    The best truss rod adjustment system I've seen is on EB MusicMan guitars. No special tools are required, located at the heel, it's smooth and effortless even on the fly.
     
  13. ed84246

    ed84246 Member

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    I agree with what most of you guys mentioned here. I don't care if the adjustment's at the headstock or other end, but just please give me access. Yes, adjusting a truss rod is easy once you learn how to do it. You can damage the neck, but only if you do extreme adjustments. I tweak the truss rod often as I live by the beach in Los Angeles where it can be 85 and dry for a week, then one day drop down to mid sixties during the day and under fifty at night with fog on the verge of rain for the next week.

    Anyone who doesn't think there's a real need to adjust a truss rod under these conditions I'm guessing has never done it. Adding relief to a flat neck can wake the guitar up, add sustain and resonance and change the tone and response of the guitar. Reducing relief can add snap and a quicker attack, brigthen the tone and lower the action. It's a significant difference to me, especially if I have a gig that night and the guitar's not playing right.
     

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