Why don't all Fenders come with jumbo frets?

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by The Interceptor, Jun 7, 2019.

  1. harvey j

    harvey j Member

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    I can't stand them.
     
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  2. fenderjapan

    fenderjapan World Heavyweight Champion Silver Supporting Member

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    Imagine playing an AVRI 20 years and going to pick up a new guitar and finding only railroad ties.

    I mean, personally, I love the railroad ties, but I wouldn't want to hear, say, David Gilmour, stuck with only Jumbo's.
     
  3. David B

    David B Silver Supporting Member

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    Tall, well polished durable frist for me every time, you can always dress a tall fret down to your desired height, but not the other direction. All guitars with tall frets have can low frets in a fairly short time.
     
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  4. DrumBob

    DrumBob Gold Supporting Member

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    Fender (and all guitar companies) go the safe route with features. Not all guitarists like jumbo frets, so to be safe, Fender goes with medium/jumbo, because they believe that's what most players prefer, and their goal is to sell as many guitars as they can. If you want jumbo frets, they figure, get a fret job.

    Same thing with Fender necks. They're putting slim Modern C necks on just about everything, because they feel that's what most people want. Well, not all of us want those skinny toothpicks; some of us want a fatter neck. I got into a near-heated argument with the Fender sales rep several years ago at Alto Music, when I told him Fender should offer options insofar as neck thickness. His argument was, "Modern C is what most people want, and you don't understand mass production." I said, yes, I do, and why can't you offer options? The guitars are modular. His response was, get something from the custom shop then. I finally gave up and walked away before things got really ugly. What a douche.
     
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  5. zombiwoof

    zombiwoof Supporting Member

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    I like the 6105 frets, but filed down a bit so they are between vintage and modern height. I guess a lot of others like the same when re-fretting, because Dan Erlewine had Stew-Mac make a fretwire that is like 6105 but slightly less tall. 6105 is a little wider than vintage Fender size, but as tall as jumbo wire. I don't see the need for really wide fretwire, it seems logical to me that as wide wire wears down, intonation will suffer as the contact point is then wider, unless you constantly re-crown the frets. Also it is harder to fit your fingers in between the frets at higher positions with wide wire. Some guys use wider wire on the lower frets and something less wide on the ones higher up the board.
    Al
     
  6. zombiwoof

    zombiwoof Supporting Member

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    I feel the same way about the neck profiles. I grew up playing a '63 Strat, so that rounder C shape is perfect to me. Fender only puts a rounder profile on a few (mostly vintage-type) guitars, and then usually only with the vintage radius. Trying to find a modern Fender with a rounder 60's type neck and the modern 9 1/2" radius and slightly bigger frets is difficult. I think there are quite a few players that would like that type of neck, but maybe I'm in the minority. I dispute the whole idea that slim necks are "faster" playing, to me someone will play his best on a neck he/she is more comfortable with, not necessarily the slimmest one.
    Al
     
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  7. Obsessive Tinkerer

    Obsessive Tinkerer Member

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    I bought my 5 year old a Squire mini and a3 watt Blackstar and have the guitar tuned to open chords to just chug on.

    Today he was chasing his sister around singing Cat Scratch Fever and hitting the right three notes. Suddenly I feel better about humanity....
     
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  8. DrumBob

    DrumBob Gold Supporting Member

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    Agreed. I wish Fender made one American Strat with a big, fat baseball bat neck, but no, they refuse. They already have 200 different Strat models out there, right? LOL.

    Same with Gretsch. All their necks are narrow and skinny. I asked them to make one model hollowbody with a fatter neck and was told "no" in no uncertain terms.
     
  9. jwguitar

    jwguitar Supporting Member

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    After a couple days of playing the same guitar consistently your hand will get used to whatever frets and neck shape is on that particular guitar you are playing.
     
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  10. Rockledge

    Rockledge Member

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    I like jumbo frets and refretted a Squier Strat with jumbo frets, but it does indeed change the way the guitar feels quite a bit. I have no problem understanding why medium and small frets are popular in Strats and Telecasters.
    Not necessarily so. I put jumbos in and file them down low.
    I have bought fret wire before that was wide but not very high.
    I file them down to a good height then put a broad crown on them, and they feel great, sliding past them is very comfortable.
    I've seem medium and small frets that are just as tall as jumbos are.
     
  11. RicardoDiazHimself

    RicardoDiazHimself Member

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    The rep was right. He wasn't the douche there .
     
  12. edwarddavis

    edwarddavis Supporting Member

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    Someday when your king
     
  13. RBH

    RBH Member

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    It really doesn't matter... if you just play and not fixate on what you think might affect your playing.
     
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  14. kunos

    kunos Member

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    that's the thing that really baffles me about these threads.
    Are these guys seriously pressing the string down until it touches the wood? Same goes for the "speed bump guys"... I mean, really? It's pretty hilarious actually... so much wasted energy.

    As for me.. ya I also find the Fender Specials with jumbos very enjoyable to play but... really, the difference with the standard fretwire Fender uses for the "standard" (now Professional) and "elite" models is still pretty tall and a good compromise that should allow everybody to play comfortably.
     
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  15. Buzzard Luck

    Buzzard Luck Member

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    For all the Electric Guitar scholars and students out there - Was string bending of any concern of the early Fender design?
     
  16. The Interceptor

    The Interceptor Member

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    I think they got by. So, in that spirit, let's stick to 7.25" radius, vintage frets and HV electrical conductors for strings. Because that was how it was done nearly 70 years ago, and any progress beyond that just proves how weak modern guitarists are.
     
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  17. adrianb

    adrianb Member

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    I must have an extremely wimpy grip since i can barely press down hard enough to make notes go sharp. (Jescar 58118 user and lover here).
     
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  18. Old Possum

    Old Possum Member

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    I know, ever see a fretboard with big gouges near the nut...who plays like that?
     
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  19. mattthehoople

    mattthehoople Member

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    You have to develop a softer touch if you plan on playing later on in life. This notion of fighting a guitar is a recipe for nerve and hand damage.

    On a different note though, frets which are fat and flat will make the guitar sound weird to me. I don't need super jumbo like 6000, but vintage frets wear down so fast, even after the first initial fret dress, they become too low for me. One of the reasons I don't have a Fender in my collection is the vintage fret sizes. The necks with jumbo frets have (sometimes) hot pickups and not a classic Strat sound. Like modern hot-rod Strats, not really what I want.

    I want a 50's ash body Strat with 22 fairly jumbo frets, compound radius, vintage 50's sounding pickups with a slightly overwound bridge, 5 way switch, tone on bridge, no tone on middle, bone nut, locking tuners, and a beefy tremolo block.

    Thus far, thats a custom build as far as I know.
     
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  20. niassist

    niassist Garage Rock Star Supporting Member

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    All my guitars have giant frets. I hate small or even medium sized frets. Being able to feel the fretboard really bugs me. I find it easy to play in tune with them, you just need to develop a bit of a lighter touch. If I could figure out to to fret my guitar with railroad ties I would!! Okay, maybe those would be a bit big.
     

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