Why don't more players use hybrid picking?

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by Gas-man, Jun 26, 2008.

  1. Gas-man

    Gas-man Unrepentant Massaganist

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    Your style of music doesn't matter.

    Why would players just let their right hand fingers go unused when they could be playing so much more cool stuff by getting them in on the action?

    Perhaps because Clapton didn't? Or SRV? Or (for the most part) the blooze guys?

    Why hit one string at a time when you can hit 3-4? Or at least have the option to do so.
     
  2. jzucker

    jzucker Supporting Member

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    lots of players do. SRV did as a matter of fact.
     
  3. dewey decibel

    dewey decibel Supporting Member

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    Huh? You can hit 3-4 notes with just a pick. In fact you can hit all 6.. :AOK.



    The reason many folks don't use hybrid picking is because it sounds different. It has a different timbre than just a flat pick. So to say your style of music doesn't matter- you're missing the point. That type of thing lends it's self to some styles better than others. For instance, it's great when you want to play 3 or 4 notes but are using a lot of string skipping, or playing those notes as a chord but slightly arpeggiated. It's also good for certain single note lines. I use it a little here and there, but for 95% of what I play a flat pick is just a better sound...
     
  4. ?&!

    ?&! Member

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    I just bought a Danny Gatton video so I can get better at it. I don't do it a lot because I have good picking chops, and I'm not nearly as proficient with hybrid picking. I would eventually like to be equally comfortable with both, so off to the woodshed I go!
     
  5. Dave Orban

    Dave Orban Gold Supporting Member

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    I've been using it forever, it just seems very natural to me.
     
  6. Guinness Lad

    Guinness Lad Silver Supporting Member

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    I only play with fingers now (12 years) after playing with a pick for 15 years. I remember watching the pick rotate in my hand while playing freaking out the whole time wondering how long before it squirted out of my hand like a little kid trying to hold a fish. I'm sure glad those days are over.
     
  7. Bryan T

    Bryan T Guitar Owner Silver Supporting Member

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    I find hybrid picking really reduces my dexterity compared to fingerpicking.

    Bryan
     
  8. mike80

    mike80 Member

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    Why?

    Because I don't do it well. The strings I pick are much more pronounced than the strings I pluck with my fingers. I've tried it many times, I just can't seem to make it sound natural.

    I can use a pick, I can fingerpick, but I can't do both at the same time.
     
  9. Gas-man

    Gas-man Unrepentant Massaganist

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    Not at the same time.

    You hit them one at a time when you strum or hit a chord.

    Physically impossible to hit more than one string at a time when you are using a pick.
     
  10. NitroLiq

    NitroLiq Member

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    Same here. My straight finger-picking chops have suffered drastically, though. Something else to work on. :cool:
     
  11. Luke

    Luke Senior Member

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    You sure about that?



    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  12. jzucker

    jzucker Supporting Member

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    Just a few players who use hybrid picking:


    • George Benson
    • Pat Martino
    • Brent Mason
    • Albert Lee
    • SRV
    • Johnny Winter
    • Brett Garsed
    • Paul Bollenback
    • Ben Monder
    • Jonathan Kreisberg
    Ironically, I would say that most of the guitarists I like use hybrid picking.
     
  13. Gas-man

    Gas-man Unrepentant Massaganist

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    Pedantry!

    Yes, you are right. I should have said most, normal, non-specialized guitar picks than one guy knows about in the whole world make it physically impossible to hit more than one string at a time.


    :moon
     
  14. Stratophile

    Stratophile Member

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    I have used hybrid picking since I began playing. I couldn't pick fast enough with a pick and made up for it with hybrid. Then I found out I could all sorts of stuff with it.

    I use it all the time.

    I think some guys stay away from hybrid or fingerstyle stuff because it look complicated or they can't get their head around it fast enough for them. Some guys can't find a guy to teach it to them so rather than trying to figure it out.....they just say piss on it.

    It's something I don't even think about. Sometimes I have a hard time showing a dude a lick because I think I straight picked it and I actually hybrid picked it.....but because I slowed the lick down I just pick it....though at speed I go, "Oh ****....I hybrid picked this thing!" HAHAHAHA
     
  15. drfrankencopter

    drfrankencopter Member

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    I found it pretty slow going learning hybrid picking. It's frustrating because I can finger pick fairly well, and can pick fairly well, but am quite clumsy at hybrid picking. fortunately it is getting better (Gustavo Asis Brasil's book is helping me out there)...but it's required lots of patience.

    I think that's why most players don't use it....there's no instant gratification.

    Cheers

    Kris
     
  16. guitbeef

    guitbeef Member

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    I've always done it too, in some form another. I come from a country music background so it's always been a necessity, but I've always used it in other styles of music as well. There was a time when I started using acrylic nails (still do) on my middle and ring nails and concentrated on getting an attack, feel and motion as close as I could to my upstroke of pick (that is,not popping or pulling the string, though I still do that as well). If I'm playing fast single note lines, I usually use the stroke of a fingernail to change to the next string, a transition in the middle of an alternate picked phrase. I don't ALWAYS do that for fast lines, there are exceptions when I strictly alternate pick. And of course I pop and pull for certain effects, and still can sorta use my fingertip for standard chord things. So I found for me that I can get close to the sound of the pick by using acrylic nails and mainly working on my touch so that I'm getting the same attack as a pick (or at least close, it can never by exact).

    Here's a couple clips of my hybrid picking wankery:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CFJmfVPfIw8

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F31E0018hkI&feature=user
     
  17. Clifford-D

    Clifford-D Member

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    I've heard that called

    Guitaristic - strummed, swept - often done with a pick
    vs
    Pianistic - plucked at same time - requires some fingers or pick/finger
     
  18. Grant Ferstat

    Grant Ferstat Some guy in obscure bands in a far away place... Silver Supporting Member

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    True, It can take a while to get that eveness, but mind you at times it's nice to exploit the different attacks and tones too.

    I've played hybrid for years but I love all kind of tones & styles:-Flatpicking Bluegrass, soft thumb strummed octaves, chicken pickin', steel bends, precise plectrum arpeggiating.

    Hybrid can be a great way to get some of what's in your head out there..
     
  19. The Captain

    The Captain Supporting Member

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    I often hit the string below the picked string wiht the back of my index fingernail, esp down-picked metal rhythm lines.
    I guess that is a bastardized version of hybrid picking.
    You can also curl the pick hand up a bit and hold the pick more on one side so you are hitting the strings with the long side of the pick and skating it across, voicing several string at once. This gives a very soft "sussurus" feel to the sound.
     
  20. MartinC

    MartinC Member

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    I'd always assumed that it's a difficult technique for anyone to master. At least it was for me. I couldn't do it all for a long time ... at least not to a standard that my ears could tolerate.

    For a long time I either finger picked, or used a flat pick ... never both. Then, I needed to perform a song in which my guitar parts changed from straight finger picking in the verse, to straight flat picking/strumming in the chorus. Trying to do the flat picking/strumming parts using fingers just wouldn't have cut the mustard. So, I could either stick my pick in my mouth for the finger picking parts and then take it out when required (and risk losing the beat and/or the pick ... several times) or learn how to hybrid pick to cover the finger picking parts with the pick covering the bass notes. I should add for dramatic tension that this was all for the first live performance that I've ever done. So the prospect of either approach was daunting. Anyway, I chose the hybrid picking path. The pressure of the performance and the deadline of the gig date were enough to push me to practice heavily in order to get it right ... which thankfully I did. Like mike80 and Realfi said, the real challenge was to produce an even volume between picked and plucked strings ... the main guitar melody demanded that.

    The song, by the way, was Eagle Rock by Daddy Cool ... my part was the main guitar melody. I don't know if this song is in any way known by folks not from Australia. I'd never heard of it before I landed here. Anyway, for would be hybrid pickers, I can thoroughly recommend this song and its main guitar melody line + chorus to develop your hybrid picking technique and your ability to switch in and out of it.

    There's another lesson in the story too, in that, without the pressure of the live performance and its fixed deadline, I probably would have never risen to the challenge. Glad I did because I can now bring in the hybrid picking without really thinking about it too much ... and my straight picking just isn't fast enough to get some things done, 'specially where there is string skipping involved. Extra fingers can cover it as Realfi pointed out ...

     

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