Why is my D string making this noise?

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by sharks, Feb 29, 2012.

  1. sharks

    sharks Member

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    Hi folks. I changed my strings the other day (was using elixir 10's, switched to 9's) and now my D string makes a high pitched vibrating sound when you play it. It doesn't get amplified so you can only hear it unplugged. I am just curious what would make this happen. I tried recording it, not sure if you'll be able to recognize this sound.

    http://soundcloud.com/kscharkss/ringing-d-string

    I use a PRS Mira which has the standard PRS stoptail piece.

    Thanks for your help
     
    Last edited: Feb 29, 2012
  2. brian817

    brian817 Member

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    Sounds like it's not seated properly in the nut or the saddle or it has some debris between the string. Loosen the tension of the string and blow out the saddle or nut and try again. The other cause could be that there's too much friction and you need some graphite to help lube the saddle or nut. Unless the action is too low now with the lower gauge strings and it's buzzing on a fret somewhere.
     
  3. poolshark

    poolshark Supporting Member

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    When you switched string gauges, did you adjust the neck relief accordingly? That'd be my guess.
     
  4. snakestretcher

    snakestretcher Member

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    Could be the truss rod vibrating in sympathy. My US Tele began making weird noises and, after tightening down every screw and nut I could find, I eventually traced it to the truss rod. A slight loosening cured it.
     
  5. Gargloic

    Gargloic Member

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    I think I know the problem even if it's not clear on the audio clip.


    The fast way to see if this is the problem I think:

    Try to play alternately the string open/pressing first fret.

    If you don't have the sound when pressing the first fret, than this is what I think. Else, I don't know.

    The slot in the nut at the head of the guitar is crafted for .010. If you put a smaller strings it creates a gap and the string makes noise by hitting each side of the gap.

    There is a cure that any luthier will be able to do easily. Either change the nut or fill the gap and redo the slot.



    Hope this helps

    Gargloic
     
    Last edited: Feb 29, 2012
  6. Trebor Renkluaf

    Trebor Renkluaf I was hit by a parked car, what's your excuse? Gold Supporting Member

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    Could just be a defective string. I once had a box of strings and I swear half of the D strings in that box buzzed when brand new. The manufacturer said they had a defective batch of D strings sent me a bunch of replacements. I've had the same thing happen with other manufacturers, and I want to say it has always been the D string.
     
  7. PhilF

    PhilF Member

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    I'm willing to bet this is the problem as well.
     
  8. JoeB63

    JoeB63 Supporting Member

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    I've had problems with 2 PRSs where the D string buzzes against the first fret when played open. It's that the nut slot has worn down a bit from playing, so now the string is too low in the nut. The fix is to have the nut shimmed up a bit (or replaced).

    I didn't listen to your clip, so that may not be your problem, but as I said, I've had that problem, only on the D string, on 2 PRSs recently.
     
  9. sharks

    sharks Member

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    Well fretting at the first fret does remove the noise. I'm going to try changing strings and see if it goes away. Thanks!
     

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