Why not your own sound

Cap Carlos

Member
Messages
155
I bake my cake using my original recipe.

I like to see how other bakers bake. I like to try their methods.

My recipe and my cake benefit from me trying out other cake recipes and baking techniques.
 

Roger Lyness

Member
Messages
239
Is there still an original chord progression out there? I use amps and pedals that many people have. Just not seeking others tones.
Yes, you can still come up with original chord progressions, but you have to think 'out of the box' sometimes. Almost all of the 'simple' ones have been used.
 

Mooseboy

Member
Messages
40
Whenever I'm trying out a new piece of gear, I always make sure that I can easily get "The Mooseboy Tone" easily and efficiently. It's the one I'm going to use, why not make sure it's there?
 

ilyslue2

Member
Messages
918
I see threads all the time of how do I get this certain artists tone. I approached it from the beginning of having my own tone.
I think that way of approaching learning is not effective at all. Have you ever watched expert learners? Look at how 3 years old learn. They copy and then repeat again and again. Music (and arts) is a language. you speak with your own voice, but you have to learn the language.
 

stevel

Member
Messages
14,939
I see threads all the time of how do I get this certain artists tone. I approached it from the beginning of having my own tone.
Well, I play with bands. And the bands I play with play covers. And "my tones" don't necessarily work well with those cover tunes.

I've actually posted something like this here before - "the tone you like versus the tone you have to use".

When I sit at home and create my own tones I can do a lot less drive, or a really nice ambient delay, or reverse effects and so on.

But when I go out and play in front of an audience, all that just isn't very useful.
 

torchlord

Member
Messages
60
I agree with OP as far as performing or recording anything. Even cover bands, I don’t understand trying to sound exactly like somebody else’s recording. Be you, sound like you.

However, it’s interesting to see how close I can get to certain tones other people have had, if only as an exercise in figuring out how to make specific sounds happen. I may find an element of somebody else’s tone that I like to make part of my own. Or I may just have fun playing around in a tone I wouldn’t normally use.
This is an important point that everyone is trying to emulate the recorded tone. How much of that recorded tone was affected by the recording engineer?
 

Ry@n

Member
Messages
757
This is an important point that everyone is trying to emulate the recorded tone. How much of that recorded tone was affected by the recording engineer?
There’s that, plus the point that others have discussed about original recording artists not even striving to achieve the recorded tone in live performances.
 

Ry@n

Member
Messages
757
Well, I play with bands. And the bands I play with play covers. And "my tones" don't necessarily work well with those cover tunes.

I've actually posted something like this here before - "the tone you like versus the tone you have to use".

When I sit at home and create my own tones I can do a lot less drive, or a really nice ambient delay, or reverse effects and so on.

But when I go out and play in front of an audience, all that just isn't very useful.
Tone definitely does need to be appropriate for the song. It just doesn’t have to be an exact copy of somebody else’s tone.
 

george4908

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,301
My tone is 12:00. Pedals, amps, carburetor jets, old blinking VCRs, you name it, they all get set at 12:00.
 

Pete Dabell

Member
Messages
251
Any tone you hear has been subjected to a load of things before it reaches your ears, the mic that recorded it, the preamp it went into, the type of tape and tape machine it was recorded on, ( maybe not so much with digital recording? ) How it was placed in the mix by the producer, subjected to eq and compression, the foibles of the playback equipment you listen to it on, etc. So trying to chase a particular "tone" is a pretty pointless exercise? ( even more so in the case of acoustic guitars ). whilst it is a good idea to shoot for a certain sound, it would be best to use it as a development towards getting your own sound together? Believe me, the audience will not notice if you haven`t got quite as much treble on a sound as the original? The same applies to trying to slavishly copy guitar breaks? I think that most guitarists styles come from trying to copy? not quite getting there, but finding something of their own instead? I`ve never really understood why anybody would want to become a human Xerox machine trying to copy something that was probably laid down as off the cuff phrases that the originators probably couldn`t remember straight after they put them down in the first place?
 

Doppe1ganger

Member
Messages
83
Ahh, the age old argument. Should I try to emulate the sound of someone else, one of my favorite artists maybe? Should I create a unique sound? At the end of the day, I say F it and just be happy with your tone. Get the gear that creates the sounds you like and need, and everything else will fall into place. Now if you're in a cover band trying to match a sound for gig reasons, that's a different story.
 

TheWayfarer84

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
2,887
It’s a fun journey. Till you achieve it. Then you sell it all off and go find something new.

I did this with Mayer and Two Rocks and one-offs and custom builds and on and on. I blew through more cash than I care to remember. It was fun. But in the end, I got so sick of it. So sick of the obsessiveness. I took a hard left and am happier for it.

(still want a Two Rock back in the house, but not a clean machine - as wonderful as they are)
 
Messages
6
You learn a lot about tones studying how others got there. I say tones, plural, because I think tones and textures can be as important to parts/songs as the notes themselves. As an example, take one of my sonic heros, the Edge from U2. Have a listen to Mysterious Ways, or the intro to Elevation. Go ahead, try to figure those out. No other well-known player comes close to reproducing those sounds because they’re such original uses of tone. You can possibly learn how to create a truly new sound that propels a new line or hook from studying such creative examples.
 




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