Why not your own sound

Roger Lyness

Member
Messages
245
I'm almost certain I'm the first to play a les paul through a marshall.
Wow, I never thought of doing THAT. How does it sound? That's a very clever Idea. I didn't know an American guitar would even work with a British amp. Doesn't it have an accent? Wow, I bet no one else sounds like That! Do you mind if I borrow your idea? I will tell everyone that You came up with that combination. Is there a Nobel prize for the best new musical Ideas? I will nominate you immediately! Who knows, It might catch on. Oh, your family should be SO proud of you. You are a genius! Oh, by the way, how does it sound? Ooh ooh, I got another Idea. How about a Rickenbacker through a Traynor? American and Canadian? Wow! That might be a little too risque, but the sound should be easy going and polite, eh? You should patent that combination so no one else can use it. Jolly good show! Roger66
 

pickleweed

Member
Messages
1,874
Lol. Any artists’ “style” is built upon natural ability, and the amalgamation of their influences. Anyone who thinks they’re building from scratch is fooling themselves.

id even go so far to say that anyone that hasn’t been influenced, probably doesn’t have a style/tone worth much anyways.

reminds me of those artists who stink, refuse to practice, and think they can get a pass by claiming”style”
 
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speedyone

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,502
To answer the original question: why do I want to SOUND (tonally,) like someone else?

That's easy--

To generate the EMOTION.

When I hear songs that I love, I love them not only because of the lyrics, or vocal style, but because they generate an EMOTION that in MY brain, is directly associated with the tone used by the guitar/bass/keyboard/etc.

So when I want to play a Kings X song, or an Yngwie song, or Eric Johnson song, if I can get the exact tone they do, it gives me an unimaginably huge emotional rush!

If you heard some guy playing A New Level by Pantera on a Tele into a Fender Reverb with a tube screamer, its not gonna affect you emotionally the same as if that guy played a guitar with dual humbuckers into a cranked Randall Stack with the gain dimed (no pun intended).

So for me, if I'm playing someone else's stuff, I want my tone to sound as close to identical as possible, because without the matching tone, it simply doesn't move me as much emotionally.

But, then again, I'm Autistic, so maybe it's just me.

:)
 

KiddBilly

Member
Messages
647
My feelings are you find your own tone through trying to chase the sound of others. Similar to the way as a kid, you spend a lot of your time trying to be like your parents/older siblings or some other mentor figure you look up to. They give you the direction to start the road to finding your own identity.

At least that is the way it has worked for me.
 

Serious Poo

Powered by Coffee
Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
6,813
There is just so much butthurt defensiveness in this thread it's comical.

@modernp - if having a sound that's unique to you makes you happy and inspires you to write, record and play music you enjoy then go for it. That's the only thing that matters.
 
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PapaPauk

Member
Messages
104
We are all influenced by different players/music and we all play different styles of music. So if we try to find our own “tone/sound” or whatever I think it’s influenced by what we like whether we consciously acknowledge that or not.

I like a lot of prog rock/metal so I highly doubt any guitar tone I come up with will be the next liquid, must-have, sultry jazz tone:bonk
 

Wound_Up

Member
Messages
51
I see threads all the time of how do I get this certain artists tone. I approached it from the beginning of having my own tone.
Duane Allman had the perfect thing to say, about this in an interview he did about 2 months before he passed away. I have it as my signature at Strat Talk so let me go copy it and it Edit this post and add it it. It's something I've lived by since I picked up my first guitar in 2019.

Edit: here it is. The question asked of him was:

What advice would you give a guitarist...today?

Skydog:
I’d tell him to remember that you can’t never play just like anyone else so you ought not to try. You gotta utilize what’s inside you to create what you want to create. You gotta sort yourself out and sort the music you hear out. Then find something to hang your notes on. You hang your notes on your attitude and on yourself. If it don’t come out pure, it don’t come out good. I never took no lessons, but I got that attitude. - Duane Allman Aug 1 1971

Along with his New Year's Resolution from 1970, those are 2 of my favorite things from Duane.

Well, other than his incredible music.
 
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Messages
1,866
The Edge said to himself "What can this new Memory Man thing do?" and influenced Delay tones/playing since.

Maybe I'll find some weirdo thing messing around with my Meris Polymoon and Mercury 7 that may appeal to others.

Sounding unique is easy, making it appealing to others not so much IMHO.
sounding unique is not easy nor is making it appealing to a large audience.
 
Messages
1,866
You’re wrong on just about every item. And all of the players you named, at some point in their progression, were trying to imitate someone else. It may be convenient for your alternate facts to ignore their learning journey and focus on the innovations that made them famous, but it’s silly, misleading, and inaccurate. But, go on thinking you’re the only one who is thinking on TGP....

But, let’s hear how you, with this unique perspective, have reinvented the guitar.
first off- when did i say i reinvented the guitar?
oh right, i didn't. Nice logical fallacy.

And no, i'm not incorrect.
Sure, perhaps early on when they were kids they wanted to sound like and be their heroes.
Does that not go without saying?
Doesn't every kid with a guitar want to be their guitar heroes to some degree?
But we are talking about the adults on TGP, are we not?
Are you being pedantic intentionally?

The players I mentioned were certainly influenced by other players but were never trying to imitate them in their bands.

Radiohead have some songs that were clearly influenced by The Pixies for example, but flat out imitation?
nah.

Tom Morello was influenced by Alan Holdsworth but show me a song in Rage Against The Machine's catalog where he sounds like him.

Has Jack White EVER sounded like Son House?
Do you understand that as an adult guitarist, you should maybe work on developing your own sound rather than chase after someone else's style and sound?
Because, of course, the irony is that if your guitar heroes did that very thing they'd have never became the guitar icons that they are?

I'll away your inevitable catty reply.
 

Ultra GP

Member
Messages
1,214
If it inspires someone to play more and find new sounds, then nothing wrong with that.

Just a bit of fun really - especially since sounding like a certain artist and being able to play like them are two different things.
 

BADHAK

Member
Messages
9,147
I see threads all the time of how do I get this certain artists tone. I approached it from the beginning of having my own tone.
How do you love music, and the sound of electric guitar, without at some point being inspired by an artists songs or a guitarists tones ??
 

RolandKorg

Member
Messages
4,489
first off- when did i say i reinvented the guitar?
oh right, i didn't. Nice logical fallacy.

And no, i'm not incorrect.
Sure, perhaps early on when they were kids they wanted to sound like and be their heroes.
Does that not go without saying?
Doesn't every kid with a guitar want to be their guitar heroes to some degree?
But we are talking about the adults on TGP, are we not?
Are you being pedantic intentionally?

The players I mentioned were certainly influenced by other players but were never trying to imitate them in their bands.

Radiohead have some songs that were clearly influenced by The Pixies for example, but flat out imitation?
nah.

Tom Morello was influenced by Alan Holdsworth but show me a song in Rage Against The Machine's catalog where he sounds like him.

Has Jack White EVER sounded like Son House?
Do you understand that as an adult guitarist, you should maybe work on developing your own sound rather than chase after someone else's style and sound?
Because, of course, the irony is that if your guitar heroes did that very thing they'd have never became the guitar icons that they are?

I'll away your inevitable catty reply.
Firstly, you’re the one who began the personal attacks. My intention was to answer the OP, and in the course of my multiple posts, I suggested a few different perspectives, ‘confessed’ that I have been/still am a rabid tone chaser, and also included some self-deprecating comments. I also talked about how I learn techniques by trying to match what other players are doing.... All toward discussing a Concept. Which, of course, was too grand a notion for your small-minded, puerile sensibilities. You couldn’t just disagree with some civil thoughts. You had to throw out your trite buzzword. And then you posted some ridiculous diatribe in which you went against published information about a slew of artists. And now you’re doubling down on the nonsense, but you need to move the goalposts to do so. Now, it’s a matter of how old those guys were.... And even so, you ignore the fact that a great number of ‘original’ artists still sometimes play covers. You ignore/dismiss the scores of talented musicians that play covers for a living. You can’t see far enough past your own arrogance to recognize that talented original artists play other people’s music, even if they don’t try to precisely mimic a tone, but somehow learning someone else’s music is different for you than learning how they produce that tone in a signal chain. I incidentally just saw Gary Clark Jr playing Hendrix. I recently saw John Mayer playing Van Halen. SRV played Hendrix.... Keith Richards was trying to play American blues. The Edge was in a cover band. EvH used to play Clapton note for note. They don’t count, though.

Apparently, you know what all these musicians you revere do when they’re not on stage or recording. They can’t possibly still play songs they love but didn’t write. But most obvious is the simpleminded ignoring that people can do more than one thing. They can chase tones and they can create their own.

But, whatever. It‘s lovely that you’re out there creating. And have no inspirations that move you far enough toward mimicry. I don’t envy that attitude, though. I enjoy that aspect of music.

Peace and Meow.
 

piazzi

Member
Messages
534
I see threads all the time of how do I get this certain artists tone. I approached it from the beginning of having my own tone.
exactly

life became simpler and more fun when I said this is my guitar, that my amp, these my pedals, and this my sound

do I have a uniquely original tone? not a chance

do I sometimes sound somewhat similar to this or that player? probably

do I give a damn? absolutely not

do I like the sounds I make? most times yes
 
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TedJames

Senior Member
Messages
799
Firstly, you’re the one who began the personal attacks. My intention was to answer the OP, and in the course of my multiple posts, I suggested a few different perspectives, ‘confessed’ that I have been/still am a rabid tone chaser, and also included some self-deprecating comments. I also talked about how I learn techniques by trying to match what other players are doing.... All toward discussing a Concept. Which, of course, was too grand a notion for your small-minded, puerile sensibilities. You couldn’t just disagree with some civil thoughts. You had to throw out your trite buzzword. And then you posted some ridiculous diatribe in which you went against published information about a slew of artists. And now you’re doubling down on the nonsense, but you need to move the goalposts to do so. Now, it’s a matter of how old those guys were.... And even so, you ignore the fact that a great number of ‘original’ artists still sometimes play covers. You ignore/dismiss the scores of talented musicians that play covers for a living. You can’t see far enough past your own arrogance to recognize that talented original artists play other people’s music, even if they don’t try to precisely mimic a tone, but somehow learning someone else’s music is different for you than learning how they produce that tone in a signal chain. I incidentally just saw Gary Clark Jr playing Hendrix. I recently saw John Mayer playing Van Halen. SRV played Hendrix.... Keith Richards was trying to play American blues. The Edge was in a cover band. EvH used to play Clapton note for note. They don’t count, though.

Apparently, you know what all these musicians you revere do when they’re not on stage or recording. They can’t possibly still play songs they love but didn’t write. But most obvious is the simpleminded ignoring that people can do more than one thing. They can chase tones and they can create their own.

But, whatever. It‘s lovely that you’re out there creating. And have no inspirations that move you far enough toward mimicry. I don’t envy that attitude, though. I enjoy that aspect of music.

Peace and Meow.
This just made me sad. Though at the same time I have to keep in mind that everyone has their own journey.
 




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