Why Play Guitar At All...

frdagaa

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
2,320
For future vids like you talk about doing, please consider doing something on rhythm -- precision, manipulation, ways of improving time fell, etc. Playing on or ahead of the beat, etc. So much guitar intstructional/inspirational material is concerned with what we play (pitch) and ignore the intricate subtleties of when we play it (rhythm). I like that you mentioned vibrato and bends and other expressive techniques that can be emotionally expressive, but without accurately and precisely incorporating rhythm in your playing, even those expressive techniques remain backseat items.
 

1992guitars

Member
Messages
60
For future vids like you talk about doing, please consider doing something on rhythm -- precision, manipulation, ways of improving time fell, etc. Playing on or ahead of the beat, etc. So much guitar intstructional/inspirational material is concerned with what we play (pitch) and ignore the intricate subtleties of when we play it (rhythm). I like that you mentioned vibrato and bends and other expressive techniques that can be emotionally expressive, but without accurately and precisely incorporating rhythm in your playing, even those expressive techniques remain backseat items.
That's a really great suggestion (and observation). Thank you!!! (And I'll go ahead and do that for sure). I've been away from the forums for a few days but thanks for the response and hope this finds you well!!
 

CactusWren

Member
Messages
810
Nice vid, warm and inspiring. I do feel the overall thesis lacks, because external circumstances are inescapable and drive nearly all of us. I believe part of the task is to set up the externals so they _help_ our goals. For example, Andres Segovia practiced 4 hours a day nearly until he died in his 90s. A good part of that, was he was still playing concerts and being idolized by the classical guitar community. Most people scale back because there is no concrete reason to keep practicing their scales. For this past year, I played 3 steadies a week, in addition to many casuals. It was more work than I wanted. However, it improved my overall ease and ear and basic skill as a guitarist--not an expected thing after playing for 25 years. Being part of a band is an external motivation, if you don't want to let them down. Peer pressure _can_ have a good effect. The simple knowledge that your skills doesn't measure up to a pro standard can result in more practice and your eventual reaching of these goals.
 

jaded_musician

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
3,334
I agree it's both internally and externally driven. The internal passion gives us the desire and interest in the instrument and music. The external forces of wanting to perform well, accomplish things for others to hear drives me to do it right. If it were only for my only pleasure, I was good enough 20 years ago. Because I perform, I know how I can always be better and strive to learn and keep my chops up.
 

Jay Bones

Member
Messages
68
Because I have too much invested in them to throw it all away. Not playing would be akin to admitting defeat, something that's hard (near impossible) for me to do.

Why not?

Because they're there.
 




Trending Topics

Top