Why would a pedal sound muted in front but come alive in the FX loop?

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by SoCalSteve, Feb 15, 2008.

  1. SoCalSteve

    SoCalSteve Member

    Messages:
    2,285
    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2005
    Location:
    Left Coast
    I have a Script RI Phase 90 that I was running into the front of the amp that was very subtle - I almost couldn't tell if it was on when playing with a band. I put it in the loop and the thing just came alive and sounds sooooo good.

    What would account for this?
     
  2. lv

    lv Supporting Member

    Messages:
    9,971
    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2002
    Location:
    Chicago
    I've experienced big changes when running pedals in front vs in the loop, I think because the loop operates at a different signal level it tends to make pedals sound different.
     
  3. Structo

    Structo Member

    Messages:
    9,573
    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2007
    Location:
    Oregon
    Probably the matching impedance is off when plugged into the front end.
    Like lamotta77 said, time based effects usually sound better in the loop.
     
  4. Scotty J

    Scotty J Member

    Messages:
    63
    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2008
    Location:
    The Center of the Universe
    Not trying to be argumentative, but the phaser is actually considered to be a filter effect, the same category as a wah. They basically sweep or notch the frequency response. It does create a phase shift between the original and processed signal, so technically you could say it is a time based effect, but not really in the sense that a flanger or a chorus is. They are considered to be modulation effects, effectively combined filter, delay and pitch effects.

    I usually run my phaser inline with my guitar before any dirt and run my flanger and chorus in the effects loop. One thing to take into consideration is that a lot of effects loops are line level signals, typically used for rack type gear.

    A buddy of mine is an Audio Engineer, he gave me the history of the flanger. What they used to do in the studio, back in the old days, is take two reel to reels with the same track on them. They would sync them up, then use their hand to put pressure on the "flange" of one of the reels, slowing it down. That would give what we know today as a flanger effect, hence the name. Kind of a neat origin.
     
  5. SoCalSteve

    SoCalSteve Member

    Messages:
    2,285
    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2005
    Location:
    Left Coast
    Yeah, I had always thought the consensus was to run a phase shifter, flanger, chorus in front but I guess you gotta just try both and see what sounds best.
     

Share This Page