Why you can't get good seats to major events

mikebat

Member
Messages
11,030
After years and years of going to every big name show in that came to town, I just don't anymore. I don't find the experience worth my $150 + for my ticket. Add in the traffic, parking, concessions, line ups...and the crappy sound, I just don't get a rise from it anymore.

If the event is in an arena or outdoor venue, I just don't go.

I used to work for a ticket broker. The good ones never have to sell on the street, but sometimes do "just to get back to their roots and feel that excitement". I always said, being a scalper is one step up from being a pimp. Since I was in that game, the promoters, venues and band management have gotten in on the game.
 

loudboy

Member
Messages
27,345
I once saw Queen, Brownsville Station, and Al Stewart, on the same bill for $5.00. (Seats in the first 15 rows...) Today, I'd have to take out a mortgage to see a show of that scale.
Especially since they're all dead...

Interesting that that particular lineup would end up that way.
 

standard24

Member
Messages
9,080
Especially since they're all dead...

Interesting that that particular lineup would end up that way.
Actually, Al Stewart is still alive and touring. He does acoustic with another guitar guitar playing who is incredible. (He's always had excellent players in his bands...)
 

sleewell

Member
Messages
10,522
I don't even want to go to big events so I guess it works itself out. small to mid size shows are so much more fun.
 

plawren53202

Member
Messages
397
I have gotten to the point where I basically HATE going to a big show, for all of the reasons already mentioned, but chief among them the racket I suspected was going on regarding ticket sales. I would 10 to 1 (or 100 to 1) rather go hear a good local band. All of the talent (or more), none of the hassle, and a tiny fraction of the cost.

My wife unfortunately still prefers the big shows with bands she's "heard of," and she has a bucket list of big name bands or artists she wants to see at least once. I have gotten to the point where I refuse to use secondary sites and pay a small fortune over the already absurd face price. So the last few big shows I have done the whole dog and pony show of getting online right when they go on sale. Prime example of how ridiculous it is: last Fleetwood Mac show in St. Louis, one of my wife's bucket list bands. I had an Amex "presale" or something like that. Even buying the tix exactly at 10:00.00 a.m. or whenever the "presale" started, my "best available" were seats in the lower bowl of the arena but at the opposite end from the stage, and they still cost me a small fortune.

Ugh.
 

Devnor

Member
Messages
3,648
There are still some deals to be had. We saw The Who for $37 each by ordering our tickets the day of the event on scalphub. MUSE for 75% of the ticket price doing the same thing. My wife wants to see Steely Dan this month. Tix are $145 to sit somewhere in the same zip code. So, again it's scalphub the day of the event. I did have to pay $350 each for Queen but event was totally sold out and in high demand. I guess it all evens out in the end.
 

Yer Blues

Member
Messages
8,549
I'm a huge GNR fan, but I won't be seeing them. I have a gig that night, so the decision is pretty easy..... but even if I didn't I still don't think I'd go.

Only way I go to concerts if it is a small setting or with a group... and in the second setting the group experience is more the selling point than the show. Seeing guys like Jimmy Herring or Andy Timmons up close is pretty awesome, not so much paying a bunch to watch Axl and Slash on a big screen.
 

Digits_Only

Member
Messages
425
"[American democracy]...rests on the purity of our fanhood; a premise that our adoration will distract us from the inequities of our actual condition..."

Geez. If that isn't the most insightful thing I've read in a while...
 

Paleolith54

Member
Messages
3,200
"[American democracy]...rests on the purity of our fanhood; a premise that our adoration will distract us from the inequities of our actual condition..."

Geez. If that isn't the most insightful thing I've read in a while...
I agree. It isn't the most insightful thing I've read in a while. In fact, it's drivel.
 

sanrico

Member
Messages
12,244
The great thing about being a media buyer is free tickets to any show you want. I miss being a media buyer.
 

Kiwi

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
4,074
I had suspected most of that (bots, insider sales, the artist's own pockets) for a while, but it's good in a way to hear it confirmed from the former CEO of Ticketmaster.

I've pretty much given up on the major events. Some months ago I was one of the naïve idiots going online at exactly 10:00:00 am when Bruce's "The River" tour came to my town. How 'bout $150 each for a seat behind the stage? No thanks. My friends wanted it more than I did and ended up paying hundreds apiece for scalped tickets.

=K
 
Messages
5,038
My wife and I got awesome seats when we went to see Return To Forever and Larry Coryell's Eleventh House at Merriweather Post Pavilion six or seven years ago. We also got good seats when we saw Jack White at the same place about a year ago.
 

Duffy Pratt

Member
Messages
2,910
Good article. I have never understood the reason for restricting scalping. I have seen lots of good shows by showing up at the venue and buying from desperate scalpers about a half hour after the show has started, at considerably less than face value.

I also don't understand the idea of the "deserving fan" who somehow is entitled to get a ticket for less than someone else is willing to pay for it. But, on the other hand, there is something shady about promoters having face value for their tickets be less than what the act is getting paid.
 




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