Why you would hate TIM

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by cityinmind, Mar 22, 2008.

  1. cityinmind

    cityinmind Senior Member

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    Ok, maybe hate is too string of a word, but all in all, the TIM seems to be the most widely used and highly touted OD pedal out there. I know this pedal isn't everyone's first choice in OD, but it is for a huge number of people. What I'd like to know, and what I haven't really seen here is, what do you not like about it or what does it not work well for (other than perhaps high gain applications). I love to know the great things about gear, but what I want to know here is what do you not like about it, or what types of amps does it do poorly with...or is it really that great of a pedal. Still haven't found a place to play one yet and if I buy one blindly, or should I say deafly, I want to be sure that this is the pedal to get. Thanks all!
     
  2. neil99

    neil99 Member

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    The only thing I can think of that would improve it would be to have the boost independant of the dirt side, but in fairness I believe the boost circuit is integrated with the drive circuit. Another nitpickey thing is the tone controls work backwards(counter clockwise=more), but once you get the hang of that, its ok. Its a nice organic drive pedal.
     
  3. Ben C.

    Ben C. Member

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    With my Timmy: Too gritty, spitty decay, handicapped EQ (remove only - why not add as well?), less than average dynamic response. Sounds good pushing an already overdriven amp though or other OD pedal down the line! On its own though - I thought that there were other pedals that performed better in similar applications (clear, low gain OD that is also good at boosting).

    -Ben
     
  4. SunnyRollins

    SunnyRollins Member

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    the worst thing of the Tim/Timmy is hearing so many praises while not owning one...
     
  5. SunnyRollins

    SunnyRollins Member

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    yes, and why doesn't it cure cancer also?

    i mean, no pedal's perfect

    :BEER
     
  6. cityinmind

    cityinmind Senior Member

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    What do you like instead?
     
  7. Ben C.

    Ben C. Member

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    He specifically asked: "what did you not like about it?".
    There you go. The last thing we need is another white-glove discussion on our holy relics.

    I prefer both the Catalinbread Silver Kiss (Mk.1 preferred), and Menatone Red Snapper (4-knob PTP preferred).
    Runners up would be the Aphek Sunday Driver (pretty close to a Tim actually but with a nicer grind IMO), and the KOT's clean boost mode.

    I'm sure I'm forgetting some others as well!

    -Ben
     
  8. SunnyRollins

    SunnyRollins Member

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    mmm...you're right.
    sorry:messedup
     
  9. mattmccloskey

    mattmccloskey Supporting Member

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    I had a Tim for a day. I really did not like it. Odd, because I love all of Paul C.'s amp designs.
    The biggest factor was how it had the clean sound bleeding through so much while on. This is what I don't like about most op-amp type pedals, and it is particularly prominent with the Tim. This makes the drive sound disconnected and very unrealistic to me.
    I also found that single notes were sort of 'small' sounding, not much mid-range girth going on.
    I suppose these aspects are intentional, but not what I look for in an overdrive at all.
     
  10. sandman

    sandman Member

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    This is simply not true...except if you're only using it with gain off.
     
  11. Ben C.

    Ben C. Member

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    S'ok - and just for the record, I didn't think the Timmy that I had was a BAD pedal at all. Just that it had characteristics that didn't work for me.

    -Ben
     
  12. cityinmind

    cityinmind Senior Member

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    On a further note, what the difference between the Tim and Timmy? And why would you have both on the same board? (i've seen it, a small 8 pedal board)
     
  13. Ben C.

    Ben C. Member

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    Yes, it is true. With my Timmy, you could either have 'unity' bass or treble, or dial out those frequencies. You couldn't add / enhance anything. Is the Tim somehow different? I believe it has the same EQ.
     
  14. Blues Lyne

    Blues Lyne Member

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    It's all relative. Even though the tone controls only cut highs or lows by themselves, if you turn the highs all the way up and the bass at 3/4 and then turn up the output until the bass is the same volume it was before, you've boosted the highs. Or if you turn the bass and treble down and turn the output up until the bass and treble are the same volume they were, you just boosted the mids.

    Generally in audio, it is better to cut than to boost.
     
  15. Sandro

    Sandro Member

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    People should say what tipe of music they play, heavy metal is different from a blues and needs a different type of OD.

    Sandro
     
  16. mrt

    mrt Member

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    Thats true^ I really dont like the Tim pedals. My fried loves them for the light rock stuff he plays, but I'll stick with my Crunch box and Keeley Rat for that over the top marshall grit. AND the Tim's cost WAY to much. To each there own. :dude
     
  17. cityinmind

    cityinmind Senior Member

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    In this case that information was irrelevant to my question. I wanted to know regardless of styles, or guitars/amps used in combination. No reason to get that specific
     
  18. Ben C.

    Ben C. Member

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    What if you want the same bass and mids, but just want a touch more highs? What if your treble and mids were spot-on, but you wanted a touch more bass to fill out your sound with a small amp in a low-volume setting? Not possible with the Timmy. And there were times where I just wanted a smidge more... and it couldn't be done. That wasn't my primary reason for selling it though - I detailed the other reasons above.
    And yes, I agree in audio recording and editing, it's generally more useful and practical to cut than to boost.
     
  19. PaulC

    PaulC Member

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    This really isn't true. There's only a couple thousand tim and timmy pedals out there. There are 10's of thousands of other ones that get talked about here just as much if not more than my pedals. I wouldn't say it's really widely used at all - there's just not that many out there for that to be the case.

    True, but that goes with a ton of pedals. In fact I'd say most people are not into that level of tweaking anyway. How many posts do you see from guys that want just one tone control?

    Also there are so many pedals that "cut". Guys just don't know that because the knobs turn the normal way. A lot of treble boost controls are really bass cuts, and a lot of bass boost controls are really cutting treble.

    At $155 I don't know of any two stomp pedals that are cheaper. For the amount of money and time it takes to build one I don't think I'm asking for to much at $155.

    Guys - it's just a pedal. I've said it many times there are days I don't like it. It's not ment to work with everything, or be liked by everybody. I had a need for something to go with my plexi back in '97, and I made it. There's no reason for the fighting that goes on sometimes. That goes for the guys who are getting onto the people that don't like it AS WELL as for the guys that go on and on about not liking it. If it worked for everybody it would be a boring pedal. It was ment to kick a strat into a plexi for clear/crunchy chord stuff. It's not a lead pedal, nor is it a smooth/thick thing. It's ment to add crunch without bogging down a plexi at gigging levels. If that's not what you're trying to do then chances are it's not for you. That's fine with me - there's plenty to choose from.

    PaulC
    Tim & timmy pedals
    myspace.com/paulcaudio
     
  20. Ben C.

    Ben C. Member

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    All true.

    And that's the way I hear it as well, and that's what makes it great as a boosting pedal (as I mentioned in my 1st post in this thred), and not so much as a standalone OD. Problem is that you have a large number of disciples who promote it as a perfect, low gain, standalone OD that covers umpteen styles and can in-fact get super smooth you just have to play with the dip switches oh change the opamp out you do know the tone controls are reversed right? it's the perfect OD for any occasion etc. etc.... So people are understandably confused when they get it and it really isn't those things.

    It's not you... we've talked about this in the past... it's the expectations other people are throwing out there that are just a bit unrealistic for any OD, imo. ****, you'd think it was a Honey Bee crossed with a Crunchbox with some Klon mixed in if you went strictly by 'eager' reviews ;)
     

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