Will Relic guitars go out of style?

dblazer

Supporting Member
Messages
296
I associate relic guitars with older musicians (there are exceptions of course).
When the older generation has moved on, there will be less interest in relics.
My impression is just the opposite. Older musicians have older, "life reliced" guitars. Young people seem to want "street cred" from having beat-to-**** guitars without wanting to wait for it.

Like I said, my IMPRESSION. I don't know. I wouldn't buy one, and I'm old.
 
Last edited:

dcbc

Member
Messages
2,119
Eventually, new guitars purchased at the same time will be "well worn" and, as a result, potentially more desirable.
 

bokeh

Member
Messages
256
My impression is just the opposite. Older musicians have older, "life reliced" guitars. Young people seem to want "street cred" from having beat-to-**** guitars without want to wait for it.

Like I said, my IMPRESSION. I don't know. I wouldn't buy one, and I'm old.
There is that, but there is another dimension to it as well. Some people just prefer things that have some kind of personality in them other than "brand new" and find them boring with that fresh out of the box paint job. A patina or kintsugi if you will. Often considered art forms by themselves. It's a way of differentiating yourself from everyone else who has the same one. I mean there was a phase when stickers where the thing for that. EVH even did it by trying to inject some personality to painting his frankenstrat. That's sort of why it's sad that Fender uses templates to relic their guitars. I wouldn't give anyone street cred just because they have a beat up guitar. Even before relic-ing was a thing. They still could have just bought it just as easily.
 

Atmospheric

Member
Messages
3,533
There is that, but there is another dimension to it as well. Some people just prefer things that have some kind of personality in them other than "brand new" and find them boring with that fresh out of the box paint job. A patina or kintsugi if you will. Often considered art forms by themselves. It's a way of differentiating yourself from everyone else who has the same one. I mean there was a phase when stickers where the thing for that. EVH even did it by trying to inject some personality to painting his frankenstrat. That's sort of why it's sad that Fender uses templates to relic their guitars. I wouldn't give anyone street cred just because they have a beat up guitar. Even before relic-ing was a thing. They still could have just bought it just as easily.
Personally, I differentiate myself just fine without wiping my butt with my gear. But I celebrate everyone’s right to do things I might disagree with. I just saw a relic’d Tom Anderson in the emporium, and it was so wrong on so many levels.
 

johnsav

Member
Messages
1,291
My impression is just the opposite. Older musicians have older, "life reliced" guitars. Young people seem to want "street cred" from having beat-to-**** guitars without want to wait for it.

Like I said, my IMPRESSION. I don't know. I wouldn't buy one, and I'm old.
I think that is part of the appeal of reliced guitars to older folks- the image that "Older musicians have older, "life reliced" guitars".
 

MusicalMan

Member
Messages
154
I think guitars will go out of style, then by default relics go with this. Guitars aren’t as “cool” as they used to be with the up and coming youth- I.e. rock is dead sort of thing here. I’m a gen X guy and it seems like the older fellas are the primary market for guitar sales. So in all reality we are the relics haha!
 




Trending Topics

Top