Will the G7 Capo fix my issue?

lespaul3013

Member
Messages
442
I've got a PRS 20th Anny SC that's my main guitar...it's great - stays in tune well - I don't use the trem.

Anyways...I have a standard Kyser capo that I've had for a while, but I never really had to use it much until now...I'm having to use it a LOT for some of the songs I'm playing - it works, but I find that it really throws my guitar outta tune and basically makes the G, B, and e strings very sharp - I have to tune after I put the capo on which is not very gig-friendly when transitioning between songs.

I've heard the G7 capo will fix this issue for the most part (I know a guitar will never be in perfect tune - especially with a capo) but I'm looking for a better alternative...there has to be one. :)

By the way...my main goal here is to have an in-tune guitar after putting the capo on, and I want the capo to be user-friendly so I can put it on quickly between songs.

Thanks!
 

DavidE

Member
Messages
3,639
I tried Kysers years ago and they always threw my acoustics out of tune. Forget about the electrics. Shubbs were much better, but I couldn't clamp them to my mic stand.

Similar to the Kyser, but worked a ton better for me was the Dunlop Trigger. Used that for years until the G7th came out. Bought one of the first G7ths and never looked back. Been using one for years now and they are fantastic. I still use a shubb and some planet waves capos (cheap enough to keep some in cases... try the PW NS Lite).

Highly recommend the G7th. Works great on my acoustics and my PRS electrics.
 

lespaul3013

Member
Messages
442
I tried Kysers years ago and they always threw my acoustics out of tune. Forget about the electrics. Shubbs were much better, but I couldn't clamp them to my mic stand.

Similar to the Kyser, but worked a ton better for me was the Dunlop Trigger. Used that for years until the G7th came out. Bought one of the first G7ths and never looked back. Been using one for years now and they are fantastic. I still use a shubb and some planet waves capos (cheap enough to keep some in cases... try the PW NS Lite).

Highly recommend the G7th. Works great on my acoustics and my PRS electrics.

Awesome...any more testimonies?? :D
 

Capador

Member
Messages
537
I have this same problem and I don't think any capo will "solve" your issue. The only thing that might help is an adjustable tension capo, but that defeats the purpose of changing quickly as you will spend time adjusting the tension. Probably less than tuning, but it's a very marginal improvement. Your guitar just needs to be intonated. If you cannot do it yourself, take it to a professional. If your guitar is properly setup, this shouldn't be an issue. That being said, I'd still invest in a good capo. I prefer the ones that tension from the middle of the neck. Also, make sure you are placing the capo correctly, as close to the fret as possible. Unfortunately, guitars will lose intonation with the weather, gigging etc. its a constant bit of maintenance to keep them properly intonated. Thus I'd learn to do it yourself...
 

chervokas

Member
Messages
6,839
Yeah, the Kysers are pretty much universally too forceful and they push stuff sharp. An adjustable tension capo will work much, much better. I've tried a bunch -- I use 'em a lot when I'm playing in open G -- and I love the G7th performance. Very easy to adjust to tension with two fingers, and very slim profile so you don't bang into it when you're playing. A major step up from the Kyser. I'm sure the Shubb adjustables will do the job too. But the G7th is all that.
 

guitardustin

Member
Messages
139
The Paige Clik sounds like it could completely fix your issue. It's the absolute most accurate capo I've used yet. It's really low profile, and fits behind the nut when you're not using it. $19 ish off amazon. You really won't regret it:

PaigeStyle%20color_006.preview.jpg


Paige Capo
 

sunken.anchor

Member
Messages
837
Kysers work just fine on my Santa Cruz acoustic, but were really bad for most of my electrics. I bought a G7th exclusively for my electrics, and it works like a charm. In particular, my Jazzmaster and Hagstrom Viking were the most out of tune with the Kyser, but they are dead on with the G7th.
 

walterw

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
40,635
I have this same problem and I don't think any capo will "solve" your issue. The only thing that might help is an adjustable tension capo, but that defeats the purpose of changing quickly as you will spend time adjusting the tension.
and that's why ned stienberger's a geeenius!
p43734h-f230740c28ffdd9735eaefff1af.jpg

the planet waves NS is a shubb that you can grab off the headstock and slap on the neck with one hand like a keyser;

or, it's a keyser that you can back off the tension like a shubb so it doesn't squeeze your damn guitar sharp!
 

dwolfggc

Member
Messages
434
and that's why ned stienberger's a geeenius!
p43734h-f230740c28ffdd9735eaefff1af.jpg

the planet waves NS is a shubb that you can grab off the headstock and slap on the neck with one hand like a keyser;

or, it's a keyser that you can back off the tension like a shubb so it doesn't squeeze your damn guitar sharp!

+1 this is what i use with my tele, works great!
 

Veritas

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
3,182
The G7 is nice! It's still not perfect, but way better than the Kyser IMO. My guitars don't get thrown nearly as out of tune.
 

chervokas

Member
Messages
6,839
walterw said:
and that's why ned stienberger's a geeenius!

the planet waves NS is a shubb that you can grab off the headstock and slap on the neck with one hand like a keyser;

or, it's a keyser that you can back off the tension like a shubb so it doesn't squeeze your damn guitar sharp!

Fwiw I've never had great success with the PW NS. I find it hard to dial in the right amount of tension and I'm constantly banging into the tension adjuster with my fretting hand when I'm playing. The G7th, which is also a one hand, hell a two finger, installation works much better for me.
 

oldhousescott

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
3,206
The G7 Nashville is a nice alternative, too. Spring loaded, but lower tension and lighter weight than the Kyser. When I need to use it, I place it close to the fret and it works great.
 

Tweeker

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,543
...I've heard the G7 capo will fix this issue...I'm looking for a better alternative...there has to be one....goal here is to have an in-tune guitar after putting the capo on, and I want the capo to be user-friendly so I can put it on quickly between songs..
...don't think any capo will "solve" your issue....Your guitar just needs to be intonated....If your guitar is properly setup, this shouldn't be an issue...I prefer the ones that tension from the middle of the neck. Also, make sure you are placing the capo correctly, as close to the fret as possible...

I've done the capo search for 40+ years and use different capos with different guitars. The match of capo to guitar can be important, one size does not fit all.
Capador's suggestion to intonate the instrument is paramount. Worn frets will also negate most of your efforts to achieve the above stated goals. Also include string height adjustment and a properly cut nut.
Depending on how quickly you need to be ready between songs -- if you can handle the extra few seconds it takes to micro adjust capo tension, you'll get better results.

I can't speak to the effectiveness of the G7, there are too many well designed capos at half the price. I own Shubb, Paige and Planet Waves NS models, all work well for certain instruments, depending on the fretboard radius/width, neck profile, string gauge, playing style and of course, how well the instrument is set up. Yes, it all makes a difference.

I'd say that off the shelf, the Shubb is most forgiving, using the softest, thickest material to clamp the stings. http://www.shubb.com/capomodels.html Also - you can AND SHOULD replace the sleeve every so often, it costs a dollar and basically gives you a new capo every time.
Don't forget the age of your strings as a factor ---DUH. Sometimes obvious and cheap solutions are under your nose.
 

ChampReverb

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
12,598
and that's why ned stienberger's a geeenius!
p43734h-f230740c28ffdd9735eaefff1af.jpg

the planet waves NS is a shubb that you can grab off the headstock and slap on the neck with one hand like a keyser;

or, it's a keyser that you can back off the tension like a shubb so it doesn't squeeze your damn guitar sharp!


The Planet Waves has fewer buzzing issues than the Shubb or G7 on my Tele, does not throw my guitar out of tune like the Keysers and can clip on the headstock. Inexpensive too.

-bEn r.
 

Steve73

Member
Messages
5,393
Another satisfied G7th user here. Expensive but they are worth it. I have some guitars with larger frets and the G7th is the only one that I can use that'll keep me in tune. They are great stage capos for speed of use and because I don't have to check my tuning after I put the capo on.
 

lespaul3013

Member
Messages
442
Just picked one up!

Only thing I see wrong is that sometimes I get a little bit of buzz when I don't clamp it enough - then when I clamp it more, it goes a little sharp...I guess there's a happy medium that I'll have to find.
 

sunken.anchor

Member
Messages
837
It took me a little while to figure out where to position the G7th so I wouldn't get any buzz. I was getting buzz on the thin strings, and, believe it or not, flipping it around (so that the side w/ the release tab was on the treble strings) got rid of the buzz completely. Using it that way, I'm a little afraid it will fall to the floor, but since it's designed to lock closed until you release it, I suppose there's nothing to worry about.
 

Tweeker

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,543
Just picked one up!

Only thing I see wrong is that sometimes I get a little bit of buzz when I don't clamp it enough - then when I clamp it more, it goes a little sharp...I guess there's a happy medium that I'll have to find.

Ah yes, less than perfect. Ain't that just a kick in the pants. "Happy Medium" would be a good name for a new model of capo!

I had one guitar that just didn't seem to like capos. After I invested in a grind and polish, all my capos suddenly worked better on this particular instrument.
Hallelujah!! My holy grail of capo searching had come to and end - because there is no holy grail.
My list of "capo friendly considerations" now includes:
string condition
fret wear
intonation
string height
nut & saddle adjustment
matching best capo to guitar neck profile (thick, thin, wide narrow, etc)
playing style (hard/soft strumming, picking, bending, etc)​
 




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