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Will these small boutique fender builds be worth anything in the future?

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by Bcduke2, May 20, 2011.

  1. Bcduke2

    Bcduke2 Member

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    I apologize in advance if this has come up a million times...I searched but couldn't find anything.

    I am looking for a guitar to grow old with. I want to be that guy who bought a 62 Strat and held on to it, and obviously we all do. As I get closer to purchasing something like a Nash or a Danocaster or a fill-in-the-blank I just wonder if it's going to be worth anything in the future. None of us really know, but what do y'all think? Which guitars will hold their value and which ones will be forgotten? Will anyone care about Nash/Dano guitars in 20years?

    For reference I am looking at Nashs, Danocastors, and Fender thin skin wildwoods.
     
  2. XKnight

    XKnight Member

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    In the distant future I think you'll be better of financially with a Fender, but who the hell knows...
     
  3. doc

    doc Member

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    Other than the iconic, already collectable guitars, most of the rest - no matter how well built and mojo laden - are likely to lose value over time. Its simple economics - lots of people are making guitars (including exponential growth in good quality Asian instruments), the generation that saw guitar as THE instrument is aging, and although demand is growing slightly, supply is growing much faster.

    My advice is, if you're buying a guitar as an investment, stick with the "blue chip" guitars - save up and buy the '62 Strat from the guy that bought it originally. The other strategy is more risky - try to predict which guitars will buck the trend and become more popular. In general I'd say particularly now, guitars are lousy investments.

    Having said that, I keep buying guitars. Not as investments, but because I like having and playing them. Keep a stable of guitars is much cheaper and less risky than a stable of women or a bad drug habit.
     
  4. Jim S

    Jim S Silver Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    by a small margin for some of us.
     
  5. CharlyG

    CharlyG Play It Forward

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    Depends on tomorrow! {;^)
     
  6. JefeMaximo

    JefeMaximo Huge Member Silver Supporting Member

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    If you're "looking for a guitar to grow old with" why is resale value an issue?

    As to your question: no one knows, nor can know. If we knew what would be a sure bet, we'd all be buying it.
     
  7. Bcduke2

    Bcduke2 Member

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    Come on, we all know that guy who had a 60's lp and sold it for 200 bucks and wishes they still had it purely because of how collectable they are. I want something I can play and play proudly for a long time. Come on, who wants to play a guitar no one cares about? I know that's not what it's all about, but that's part of the fun :)
     
  8. John Hurtt

    John Hurtt Supporting Member

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    It is unlikely that a small boutique builder, especially if builder only assembles partscasters, will ever really hold it's value down the line. It could happen, but probably not.
     
  9. shane8

    shane8 Member

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    :mob if u ask me (!) just pick a plank u like and play the damn thing - that's what they're for!
     
  10. lumco

    lumco Most of the roads I travel are muddy Gold Supporting Member

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    I will play a guitar no one cares about. Give me a closet full of them over one that will be worth $$$$ 40 yrs from now. If nothing else we can trade them for a tank of gas.
     
  11. TresGatos

    TresGatos Member

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    in the year 2050:

    You: "This guitar is a 40 year old copy of a 100 year old guitar. It was made with fake wear marks and aged paint to feel like it was 60 years old. It's amazing."

    Friend: "So it's a fake?"

    There's your value right there.
     
  12. treeofpain

    treeofpain Silver Supporting Member

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    I play out all the time with my Thorn R/S, and nobody ever knows what it is. To the general public, I just say it's a guitar that I like. To other guitarists, I explain that it's a custom guitar builder in Glendale, California.

    Either way, it doesn't matter to me. I've have owned (and still own) plenty of cool vintage and modern stuff, so I am less concerned with impressing people and more about enjoying the instruments.
     
  13. Presc

    Presc Member

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    Perhaps if it's an early edition made by a builder that becomes very popular later on (a big star starts playing that model for example).

    I think the big thing with those old guitars are that they are THE original, and they are very scarce. So maybe in some scenario where in 2030 Rockstar X is playing a guitar made by Builder Y, who stopped making guitars in 2020...maybe those become valuable. But I think it is unlikely. With a parts guitar like a Nash, I think the value is always going to be limited by the generic nature of the underlying materials.
     
  14. ManliusGuitar

    ManliusGuitar Member

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    I don't know if I agree with this. Prices have remained relatively steady, which doesn't support the idea of an over saturated market. At least not yet. I think the bigger guitar manufacturers have been wise in their production numbers over the last few years.

    Back to the OP, I don't think there is room for significant appreciation in any newer guitar like you mention, although if you buy used I think you can always get your money out of it.... so to repeat the old cliche, buy one you like to play!
     
  15. foppy

    foppy Member

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    A well-made guitar will always be worth something, as long as people play guitar.

    But the ones you're talking about won't shoot up in value like 50s/60s Fenders and Gibsons. Nothing ever will again in the guitar market, I predict. There are special, generational conditions that made that happen, which won't be repeated.
     
  16. A-Bone

    A-Bone Montonero, MOY, Multitudes Gold Supporting Member

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    :agree
     
  17. dspellman

    dspellman Senior Member

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    I don't think you'll find any appreciable collector's value in the copies and reissues, even in the one-offs coming from the original builder. Certainly far less likely in the copies built by others. They'd have to develop their very own reputation, legend and iconic status, and honestly, there are none of those so far.
     
  18. dspellman

    dspellman Senior Member

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    This is probably the most important factor; an entire generation grew up with specific guitars and the music and generation helped define each other. It's genuinely difficult to identify a truly iconic guitar player who's begun his career within the last 30 years or so. Good and even great ones, to be sure. But no one who's so firmly tied to his generation, and certainly no guitar that's held in that regard.
     
  19. 2HBStrat

    2HBStrat Member

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    :agreeTHIS is classic!

    I think there might be a small chance that some of the early copy guitars, by builders mentioned on these forums, that used a real Fender headstock shape (before they had to come up with their own slightly different headstock shape to comply with the law) 'MIGHT' appreciate in value, but then only to those who know either what they are or who think they are Fender guitars.

    However, my bet is that some of the real Fender models, like the earliest reissues, or the '82 or '83 'standard' models, or the Vinettos or master builds or things like that, will have the most chance to gain in value over the years.
     
  20. Tim Plains

    Tim Plains Supporting Member

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    Bcduke2, that guy you referred to didn't buy a '62 Strat because it was a '62. He just bought a Strat because that's what was available at the time. You should do the same. Find an awesome playing/sounding high quality Strat and you'll just as happy as that guy.
     

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