Wood flooring or wood look tile flooring?

Discussion in 'The Pub' started by telest, Apr 4, 2015.

  1. telest

    telest Member

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    My wife and I are trying to decide on new flooring for a house we will be moving into in June. We have wood floors now, but with a dog, there is constant "clickety clack" from his nails. Yes they are trimmed. :) The extra noise could be because it's a laminate material. We've had real wood floors in another house, but it was not very durable. A wood look tile floor is an appealing option, less noise and durable. Also more expensive, but not a deal breaking issue. What say you fine people on this subject? Thanks.

    Steve
     
  2. lefort_1

    lefort_1 Nuzzled Firmly Betwixt Gold Supporting Member

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    Some flooring manufacturers list the surface hardness of their products.
    I think they use the Janka scale.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Janka_hardness_test

    About 8 years ago we put in hardwood that rated highly (it was listed as a "Brazilian Farmed Cherry wood" thay ranked high on the Janka, and it has held up exceedingly well to our to Blue Heelers (dogs that get really excited and run/jump whell someone drives up). You still hear the 'click, click'... as long as dog-nail touch hard flooring, I don't think you can totally get rid of that.

    I know, for an absolute fact, that the laminate hardwood at work would NOT hold up to the same abuse. I personally won't go that route again.
    When service-dogs come in, the 'tick-tick' is a higher-pitched/more annoying sound.

    Maybe try taking your dog to the flooring-store and get them walk on samples??
     
  3. Tone_Terrific

    Tone_Terrific Member

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    Watch for laminates that chip at the surface under stress or can be scratched right through.
    OTOH, wood seems to be less durable to light abrasion and wear, but can be resurfaced.
    Otherwise, YMMV.
     
  4. lefort_1

    lefort_1 Nuzzled Firmly Betwixt Gold Supporting Member

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    Ah, I looked over that wiki Janka listing and found what I think our flooring was made of (with a tasteful reddish transparent stain added)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hymenaea_courbaril

    Anyway, the hardness of any flooring is going to be a direct function of the wood used.
    If anyone has easily pitted/damaged hardwood flooring, then the material was probably not suitable for flooring in the first place by virtue of plant species.
    As an example: I've got some 100 year old (cut 100 years ago) Douglas Fir old-growth TNG...but there's no way I'd put that softwood on a floor.
     
  5. derekd

    derekd Supporting Member

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    We just bought a house with a laminate wood floor. Looks nice, but the previous owner's schnauzers scratched it up a bit. We keep our dog's nails clipped (my wife is an expert with clippers and a Dremel), but there will always be a click sound, however, we aren't getting the scratches anymore.
     
  6. FFTT

    FFTT Member

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    Over the lifetime of the home, if you are staying put, real hardwood is the way to go.
    Scratches, gouges, pets, water stains, accidental spills, can destroy the top layer of composite flooring beyond refinishing.

    Real hardwood oak is nominal 3/4" so even in a worst case, a refinisher can repair the problem sanding or simply by replacing the damaged planks.

    Just keep leftovers for any such incident.

    My floors have gone through hell over the last 23 years and they can still be refinished
    and look fantastic. The lighter the stain the better for hiding scratches and dust bunnies.
     
  7. DustyRhodesJr

    DustyRhodesJr Supporting Member

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    No one is talking about the tile.

    A restaurant I go to just replaced their floors with tile that looks like wood.
    And I mean it looks just like wood.

    The owner said he did it so he wont ever have to do anything to it, so I
    guess it must be durable.
     
  8. j2b4o

    j2b4o Member

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    Porcelain tile is about the hardest floor you can get and the new plank wood style porcelain looks great. You will never need to refinish and its damn near impossible to scratch. I personally like the look and have been seeing it more and more.
     
  9. tonyhay

    tonyhay Supporting Member

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    We just put some wood-look tile in a kitchen / bathroom space. Looks fantastic.
     
  10. buddaman71

    buddaman71 Student of Life Silver Supporting Member

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    My brother and SIL just installed distressed wood-look porcelain tile in and it looks just great!! Runs around $2.39/ft at Lowe's.
     
  11. telest

    telest Member

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    I think I was sold on the tiles from the start of this exercise, but appreciate true experience opinions on all options. Thanks everyone. :aok
     
  12. Fishyfishfish

    Fishyfishfish Member

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    I would seriously check out the tile. Might be a little colder feeling on the foot, but after living in houses with hard wood floors I am very skeptical of doing it again just for the wear factor alone. If your house is on a slab foundation I would consider tile first H/W second. Just my carpenter opinion.
     
  13. DustyRhodesJr

    DustyRhodesJr Supporting Member

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    My house is not on a slab, it has a crawl space.

    Can I use tile?
     
  14. pokey

    pokey Supporting Member

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    Sure

    You just have to put down hardi-backer or similar underlayment.
     
  15. mattamatta

    mattamatta Member

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    I actually like the look of the non-realistic wood grain tiles. Some that have the grain and pattern but not the natural wood colors. I've see some in sorts of grey-blue or greenish colors that look pretty cool as a tile and not as a faux wood.
     
  16. grill

    grill Member

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    i was wary of tile floors in the house until i lived with them.

    i like them a lot now.

    maintenance/cleaning is a breeze.

    and i don't worry about spills!

    hell, we have drains in the bathrooms and kitchen, i could literally hose the place down.

    if they look good, go for it.
     
  17. ACfixer

    ACfixer Member

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    And you have to use your brain. The hardi-backer has seams obviously and care must be taken to lay out your underlayment so that the seams will be as far from grout lines as possible.
     
  18. Mike9

    Mike9 Supporting Member

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    If you are in Florida I'd go with tile.
     
  19. Whiskeyrebel

    Whiskeyrebel Member

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    I put wood pattern vinyl plank in the bathroom. It joins by overlapping edges like Pergo, and forms a floating floor in a similar fashion. It does not adhere to the floor beneath the way traditional vinyl squares do. Having put ceramic tile, Pergo and vinyl plank on floors, the vinyl plank was the most troublefree. It would certainly be the quietest under your dog's claws and be no more likely to scratch up than any other vinyl flooring. It looks at least as realistic as wood pattern Pergo, though not as rich as solid hardwood.
     
  20. ACfixer

    ACfixer Member

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    ^^^ I was thinking of trying that in my cabin bathroom.
     

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