worship music???

Status
Not open for further replies.

Pass_Auf

Member
Messages
71
So... Can someonme explain what worship Music is. For example bands like Hillsong is often mentioned.
Plenty of the gear reviewers on youtube often refers to that kind of Music. And I must say that most of the reviewers seems to be pretty pretentious about their tone. Is that a myth?
 
Last edited:

frdagaa

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
2,425
Posters to this thread need to remember to avoid any religious content, which is against the rules of this forum.

As a genre, contemporary worship music can cover a fair amount of ground. But a lot of it, at least a few years ago, has been heavily influenced by U2, with the types of delays and guitar tones that are used. Get on YouTube and listen to some of the music if you want to get a better idea of what it sounds like.

To me, one of the interesting aspects of contemporary worship music is its "function" as a place for musicians to play music. It seems that (at least in America) more guitarists get to use their craft in church than in coffee houses, bars, etc.
 

Chrome Dinette

Senior Member
Messages
14,372
Personally, I like Messiaen, Palestrina, Guillaume De Machaut, Carlo Gesualdo, etc, but I don't think I that's what you were looking for.
 

JCW308

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
8,759
There are some VERY accomplished players out there such as Ben Gowell, who plays lead guitar for Paul Baloche. Ben's sound is easily recognizable and his tone has always been incredible. http://bengowell.com/
 

rowdyyates

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
5,274
Worship music covers a vast range, from Handel's "Messiah" to Lecrae's rap. "Contemporary" worship music, such as Hillsong is just one component, but sounds like what your question concerns. In itself, it covers a range of styles. I'd suggest Chris Tomlin. Listen to Lincoln Brewster for some nice guitar work.
 

Pietro

2-Voice Guitar Junkie and All-Around Awesome Guy
Messages
16,442
It's music with a specific religious purpose, which I won't detail or discuss.

"Church music" has often throughout history reflected or directed the artistic expressions of the day. Since the expression of this day is "rock" music, church music became rock music.
 

crambone

Member
Messages
18,012
Agreed with pretty much what has been said above. It should be noted that a large percentage of TGPers are P&W players (myself included) and are sometimes bigger gear-freaks than most. We too emulate the big players of our genre and if one of the big group's guitarists (Nigel Hendroff from Hillsong or Jeffrey Kunde from Jesus Culture, for example) start using a specific pedal or amp, that suddenly becomes "THE" thing to get.
 

bobotwt

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,418
After more than a decade playing and singing in this context, I have grown so weary of everyone always wanting the guitar to sound like The Edge. I can only take so much 4 to the floor, dotted eighth delay. I always get excited when I get to do more gospel-soul oriented songs.

Josh
 

ldizzle

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
5,424
Personally, I like Messiaen, Palestrina, Guillaume De Machaut, Carlo Gesualdo, etc, but I don't think I that's what you were looking for.
Lol! Music educator?

I work for a church- worship music can range from heavy r&b to funk to delay/verb washed out toanz to classic choral and gospel vocal styles... Wide variety...

For contemporary radio music... Tomlin, Jesus culture, hillsong, elevation church, bethel, life way, Kirk Franklin, Phil wickham, Kari jobe... Tonssss more.
 

Nurk2

"Ignore Everybody" ~Hugh MacLeod
Messages
8,079
I'm not even going to read the thread.

Music is concept and execution - "pretension" can creep in no matter what the genre.

BOTTOMLINE FOR CREATING MUSIC:
- What are you trying to accomplish?
- What do you want it to sound like?
- How do you create that sound?
- Are you capable of doing it?

The rest ("worship," "jazz," "hard rock," "alt. country," etc.) is just words.
 

Chicago Slim

Member
Messages
4,335
I am now working as a co-Music Director and Praise Team leader at a church. I do a combination of modern praise and traditional gospel music. The keyboard player does tradition service, music. I'm enjoying it, and they never throw beer bottles at you. As a matter of fact, the reaction has been great. When I first started filling in for the keyboard player, people would stop me in public, and tell me how much they enjoyed the music. It's been more rewarding than playing for recording artists.

For P&W guitar, I suggest checking out Mark Lee, from Third Day.
 

loudboy

Member
Messages
27,316
It's designed around the message, so it tends to be heavy on repetitive hooks, and very simple, straight-forward lyrics.

The congregation needs to know it, by the time the 2nd chorus hits...
 

korby

Senior Member
Messages
10,283
I lived with and worked for Keith Green in the 80's and got to hang out with the people who started contemporary christian music , Keith used the same studio players that Steely Dan used
on his records so quality music was always a part of the recordings but the live tone was a pretty simple fare until people started copping U2 's tone live .
 

TheoDog

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
19,948
I am pretty sure the OP is referencing Contemporary Praise & Worship as a genre.

Many that play this genre are working hard to emulate what original recording sound like, so researching rigs and noticing a "usual suspects" batch of effects is commonplace.
The reason the players are hoping to get close to the recorded versions of the songs is that they hope the audience (congregation) will sing the songs... So providing them a familiar sound/arrangement helps.
Add to this that the venues are somewhat sterile sounding, so things like RF interference and buzz are more of a concern. Also, many venues are big advocates for IEMs and zero stage volume, so making the tones work well in a FOH mix and inspiring to a player wearing earbuds is part of the process.

It is pretty easy to go to CCLI.com and research the top 100 praise and worship songs being used in modern churches today, and then imagine, as your gig, you need to recreate those tunes pretty much spot on... To a click track... On IEMs... Without any distracting noises. But you only need to do about 4-6 of them a week.., but for sure a different batch each week.


I have been playing P&W since 2001. I have kept the freedom to let my tone be my voice, and still nail trademark hooks, intros, etc.
While many have large pedalboards to achieve a very wide variety of tones, I chose to go minimal.., because when I go to church, I am also toting my wife and kids, get 15 minutes to set up and line check, and need to load out quickly before the next service.
 

TheClev

As seen on TV
Messages
5,289
Agreed with pretty much what has been said above. It should be noted that a large percentage of TGPers are P&W players (myself included) and are sometimes bigger gear-freaks than most. We too emulate the big players of our genre and if one of the big group's guitarists (Nigel Hendroff from Hillsong or Jeffrey Kunde from Jesus Culture, for example) start using a specific pedal or amp, that suddenly becomes "THE" thing to get.
That's certainly true for me. I've used more delay and reverb pedals than I care to count. But eventually I settled on a TC Electronics Nova System and phased out my pedals (although I still miss them on some Sundays). The worst part about being a P&W gear freak is that when you really nail the tone — and I mean, really get that perfect atmospheric sound — you're the only one who notices the difference. But anyway, like others have said, Worship music is basically a more radio-friendly and eminently repeatable U2.
 

stellablue

Member
Messages
2,412
I am pretty sure the OP is referencing Contemporary Praise & Worship as a genre.
It's important to note that worship music encompasses the whole breadth of religious music, while the term "P&W" refers specifically to the top 40 Christian music style of Hillsong, Tomlin, Jesus Culture, etc.
 

Echoes

Senior Member
Messages
6,218
Praise and Worship music per se is a modern genre where the band plays in a 'church context' and the 'audience' is the 'congregation' of that church.....the styles used by the 'worship band' can cover a ton of territory from ancient traditional hymns to heavy rhythmic rock and rap-hip hop ...

it is one of our culture's public music contexts in which a musician can stay very busy regularly playing music to sometimes huge audiences that are mostly receptive and enthusiastic...
 

mikebat

Member
Messages
11,332
OT but......

It amazes me that there is more than a church organ playing 10 second interludes between structured parts of the mass. Quebec Canada is largely Roman Catholic, very homogeneous, and we NEVER had drums, guitars, bass, or any keyboard besides a Pipe organ at any service.

When I see American media with black gospel services, or "P&W" stuff, it seems so foreign, almost as if it is just a myth. Same goes for the entire Gospel and Christian music music sales. It simply is not present here.

I think it is awesome that there is music being played by musicians in your houses of worship.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.






Trending Topics

Top