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Would you sell a Rolex that was a gift in order to fund a guitar purchase?

boo radley

Member
Messages
2,220
In *general* when you give a gift, especially an expensive one with some sentimental value like male jewelry (watch), or a fine shotgun, or artwork, you don't expect the recipient to say, "Hey mind selling it first, and giving me the cash? Actually, I'll save you the trouble, and sell it myself, ok?" But...there are nuances. I've certainly sold some expensive family gifts.

Here is an easy litmus test: if you sold it and bought a guitar, or whatever, and your stepfather later asked about the watch...would it bother you to tell the truth?
 

beckstriad

I'm frosting a cake with a paper knife
Double Platinum Member
Messages
5,350
I'm a watch guy (and get overly sentimental about gifts), so my answer would be no. However, it would depend upon how much it meant to the person who gave it to you for you to have it, your opinion of that, what kind of guitar you were getting, and the ratio of enjoyment/regret for making the ultimate decision.
 

mikebat

Member
Messages
11,644
It depends on the guitar.

if it is for a guitar that will depreciate immediately...I think it is a huge mistake.
 

WordMan

Wax Rhapsodic
Platinum Supporting Member
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9,868
Sure check and let him know you’re selling it. But if you’re focused on a guitar you are going to play, you can let him know you’ll think of him - a lot more often vs a watch in a drawer - and get one that holds value and is an heirloom in its own right.

But some random diamond-encrusted asset you keep in a drawer vs a tool you use regularly and if you choose well, can be just as heirloom-y? Surprised this is a discussion.

if you cared about the watch or it has to extraordinary upside potential, it would be a different decision. But it is not, apparently, so it doesn’t have to be. Done. Get a guitar you’ll use.
 

juxtapolice

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,258
After reading these posts I still can't imagine holding on to something like that, sentiment or not. I cannot stand idle objects, I've always been a minimalist and tend to keep around only things I use. Even if it was worth 500k, I'd sell right away, fund the guitar of my dreams and throw the rest towards savings/debt. That's only my perspective though, I don't plan on having a family/legacy and I play full-time so a watch isn't of much use to me or any high value item outside of instruments ... You only live once but I'm happy OP has it to make the decision with
 

_MonSTeR_

Member
Messages
540
In *general* when you give a gift, especially an expensive one with some sentimental value like male jewelry (watch), or a fine shotgun, or artwork, you don't expect the recipient to say, "Hey mind selling it first, and giving me the cash? Actually, I'll save you the trouble, and sell it myself, ok?" But...there are nuances. I've certainly sold some expensive family gifts.

Here is an easy litmus test: if you sold it and bought a guitar, or whatever, and your stepfather later asked about the watch...would it bother you to tell the truth?
I’d have said that being given a shotgun is similar to being given a hammer or a screwdriver, it’s a tool, if you have one sell it. But I’m British and we don’t fetishise firearms ;)
 

sws1

Member
Messages
12,216
Funny, because if this thread I just looked up the price of a Rolex my wife bought me 10 years ago (which I love and wear every day), and new, they have gone up 50% in the last 10 years.

Keep the watch.
Try to sell yours and see what you get. It's not anywhere near the new price.
 

jens5

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
2,614
I received a Rolex Submariner non date adjust, for my 21st birthday from my father in 1971. It's a 69 model.
In 1971 the watch would sell for about $300. After cleaning and service,($1460) the watch now appraises for between $10,000 and $12,000. Apparently the older, non date versions are worth more than the date adjust. I've dived this watch all over the world as I worked at Duke Hyperbarics as a Diving Med tech for 14 years. I would never sell it. Too much sentimental value and I don't know of many other time pieces that would have stood up to what I've put it through in in 49 years. I don't consider the watch to be a luxury show-off thing, it' just a watch that I wear every day. When I pass, it goes to my Nephew.
 

Someotherguy

Senior Member
Messages
299
Keep it and find another way to raise funds. The older me wants to go back and slap the bejeezus out of the younger me for selling some of the things I sold to fund the purchase of a passing fancy.
 

mlj_gear

Member
Messages
3,210
Meh... I would keep while you're step-dad is alive and not ask about it. If he notices that you never/rarely wear it and volunteers a "You know, if you don't use that watch I gave you, you shouldn't feel bad about selling it and getting something nice that you'll use," you're good to go. Otherwise it would be pretty lame to sell it now or ask about it, IMO. I have no interest in having a Rolex myself, but I would keep it if I were in your situation. People are more important than guitars.
 

chandra

Member
Messages
1,618
I see all sides presented in this thread, and I truly cannot speak on anyones behalf. Everyone has different life circumstances and values.

If my stepfather gave me a watch, Rolex or Timex, I’d keep it forever. There is no other material object in the world (to me) that can replace the sentiment of a hand-me-down gift from a parent. And personally? I don’t think there’s any guitar in the world worth what aging Rolex’s are currently valued at. But that’s just me.

I wouldn’t sell the Rolex to fund a guitar. Wouldn’t even cross my mind. That’s just me though. Best of luck with your decision.
 

kafka

Member
Messages
1,865
I have a fake that looks just like that. I paid $5 for it to a street vendor in NYC as a joke in the late 80s. Hope yours is real.

My real watch is an Omega Seamaster. I wear it, but it distinctly pegs me as an 'old guy', as if anyone had any doubt. I only know one other person who wears an analog watch (a Rolex), and he's old, too. Everyone else either wears nothing or an Apple watch.

Wristwatches are a dated technology. I disagree that they will always appreciate. I like the engineering that goes into making a mechanical device like that work, but let's face it, any cheapo quartz watch will tell better time, and be more reliable. A watch is purely jewelry. The materials in a decorated Rolex probably aren't that inherently valuable, and the price reflects the perceived value of the craftsmanship. I think the younger generations have a distinctly lower appreciation of such things than we did. So I disagree that the price will always go up.
 
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squeally dan

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
6,102
I wore the watch to work once. I wasn’t in the building five minutes before someone said “omg is that a Rolex?” Since then I’ve only occasionally worn it to dress up events. I do appreciate it but I will never wear it. Still leaning towards keeping it for now.
 

jiml

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
11,466
Yes, the Rolex will continue to rise in value.

But, since you don't wear it, and it's not running, it might cost you some money to get it into running condition that will bring the most money if you sell it.

Because of all the fakes out there, Rolex has stopped selling parts to non authorized service centers, making repairs and service really expensive.

Even if it's running, lack of service might be held against you when going to sell. Original boxes and papers also help increase value at resale..

I got rid of a few old Rolex watches, but they were in really rough shape...
 

vds5000

Member
Messages
2,239
Couple of things - That watch is a reminder of how highly your stepdad thought of you when you received it. You can't really put a value on that. (Maybe I'm just too sentimental?)

Wearing a Rolex doesn't make someone 'douchy'. It's about how they act when they're wearing it. I wear one almost everyday. When someone asks about it or makes a big deal about it, I play it down and change the topic.
 

DecoWaves

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
1,119
Material Possessions ... When you die, you can't take them with you; Period.

If the watch has no sentimental value and, is not providing any enjoyment/happiness while you're alive, having it kept stashed away seems like an absolute waste on so many levels -- like you are left in charge to store someone else's special memories that mean nothing to you. If I was in this position, I would sell it and specifically use the funds to buy something that is both special and meaningful; that brings fulfillment and joy to my life. A super nice guitar that I could play daily? Yes!!!

Now .... I would not sell the watch to buy run-of-the-mill things like pedals, cables, random crap .... disposable commodities that have little to no long-term value and stuff that you'll probable part ways with in years to come.

Just my two cents -- Good Luck!
 




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