Wow LP Content on Fleabay

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by Sarasmiles, Jan 15, 2008.


  1. Sarasmiles

    Sarasmiles Member

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    This looks like a beauty, But I doubt he will accept trades LOL

    1958 LP Burst on ebay

    Not to far from me either, I should stop by the store there just to check it out closer.
    Sara
     
  2. Drew68

    Drew68 Supporting Member

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    Doesn't a $70,000 BIN seem kinda low for a '58 burst? I thought these had long hit the $100,000 mark.

    Edit: I missed the part about the headstock repair and the refinish.
     
  3. FlackBase

    FlackBase Felonious Monkey Gold Supporting Member

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    Considering it has a MAJOR headstock repair and a refin, not to mention swapped tuners, it sounds kinda high to me.
     
  4. paintguy

    paintguy Long Hair Hippy Freak Silver Supporting Member

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    Hmmm... still seems reasonable to me.


    I mean for 58' burst.
     
  5. Fixxxer

    Fixxxer Member

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    Is this real? If it is and given the rarity, this may be worth looking into. However, if you can afford to drop 70k, you might as well go all the way and get the real deal.

    Hard call, but the guitar looks nice. I am not a fan of headstock repairs, but given its a 58 and only 1 of 2 one piece tops in existence, that's kinda hard to pass up.

    Oh well, thanks for posting.
     
  6. StJimmy

    StJimmy Member

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    Apparently, those in the know say it's not a 58. It was originally a 57 gold top and has quite a documented history. Neck has been shaved, refinned a bunch of times, it has sported a couple of different serial numbers, and other odd issues. Seems the prior serial number on it was 9-1960 which was outted when the owner of the real 9-1960 caught wind.....so now it is sporting a 58 serial number.
     
  7. DavidE

    DavidE Member

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    I know someone who recently turned down over $300k for a clean, well documented and rockstar owned and used '58 burst. I sent him the link in case he wants a backup for gigs.
     
  8. DavidE

    DavidE Member

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    Who are "those in the know?" What evidence is there either way????
     
  9. StJimmy

    StJimmy Member

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    My post is a little muddled and I mispoke. The guy who had put the 59 serial number on this one reportedly also owned the real 9-1960 at the time. His intent was not to mislead but to sport a number that matched a flamed top, not a gold top.

    I guess the evidence is in the photos and 4 year old threads about the guitar posted from people familiar with (including a forner owner) the guitar. Photos going back to the 1970s, too. And you can clearly tell that its the same one piece top from all the photos.

    It's probably a nice piece of wood and worth some good money, but is not being represented accurately. Don't know if the seller knows it or not.
     
  10. Trout

    Trout Member

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    So its not actually a 58?

    I know where that shop is, I have driven past there hundreds of times,Do you know of any links? He does mention it is well documented, but my take is he is taking the consignees word on a lot of it in the listing.

    Trout
     
  11. TwoTubMan

    TwoTubMan Member

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  12. daddyo

    daddyo Guest

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    It's a nice axe but a shame they didn't leave it a goldtop. Nice looking guitar. The LPF guys say it last sold in the condition it's in with a different serial number for $27K.
     
  13. jtm622

    jtm622 Member

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    If somebody keeps changing the serial number on that thing, I've gotta believe that their "intent is to mislead"...
     
  14. Trout

    Trout Member

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    So, if that is actually the case, would that listing be fraudulent? And since the serial number is not correct one could actually consider it a forgery.

    I sent a message to the guy asking to see the guitar in person but got no response. I am pretty sure I am not the only one that has asked. It is bad enough we get so many off shore knock offs, but this guitar ends up being not much different in my eyes.
    Kinda Sad.

    Trout
     
  15. John Phillips

    John Phillips Member

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    It's certainly been messed about, but if it's even a '50s Les Paul at all, 70K seems 'cheap' (I know, it sounds crazy to say that too :).) But $70K and $300K are not remotely the same thing. That's the difference between a fairly expensive car and quite a nice house...

    In the late '80s I missed a totally hacked-up '50s Standard - stripped finish, headstock break, wrong pickups, can't remember what else but it was a wreck... $3,000. That seemed a 'crazy' price for a guitar in that sort of condition (70s LPs were about $1,000 over here at the time), but I knew it wasn't really. Someone beat me to it unfortunately.

    Would I pay $70K for it now? No.
     
  16. Dr. Tweedbucket

    Dr. Tweedbucket Deluxe model available !!!11

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    I was thinking the same.
     
  17. jtm622

    jtm622 Member

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    If you accept that the reason those '50's Les Paul Bursts sell for such high prices is because of the high "investment value" given to them by collectors, and that the investment value given to a particular guitar is conditional to it's being in "good, original and non-modified" condition - then you have to arrive at the conclusion that this guitar has little or no appeal in the real-world "collector" market.
    If it has no appeal to the collector market, then its intrinsic value could be fairly used to establish a sale price... Well, IMHO, the intrinsic value of this guitar is nowhere near $70,000 - not even close - it's been modified all the way from its serial number to its finish.
    You pay $70K for that guitar and you just got JAMMED... BIG TIME.
    That guitar is sucker bait, IMO.
     
  18. John Phillips

    John Phillips Member

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    But the intrinsic value of a mint all-original '58 is not even close to $70K either, let alone $300K. You could have an absolutely perfect replica built for around $10K I would think (certainly for $20K), that would be exactly the same in every constructional, functional and visual way. An expert would be able to tell them apart, but only by the minutiae of things that don't actually make a difference to it's intrinsic value as a musical instrument.

    So on that basis, that guitar (hacked I agree, but it could actually be made a lot better and more 'honest' with fairly minimal work, which would not cost more than a couple of thousand dollars at the absolute most) is worth whatever a person who wants a $300K guitar but can't afford it will pay to have the next best thing.

    Whether the next best thing is a modern reproduction or a repaired and refinished guitar that is still an original '50s LP Standard underneath, is up to the buyer.

    Personally I think paying $70K for a mint all-original one would be crazy too, but go tell that to the people that have driven them up to nearly five times that :).


    I've never understood the logic that a repair or a refinish takes away half the value of an instrument. Every Stradivari violin that is still playable today has had fairly major repair work including neck resets, fingerboards, tuners, bridges and tailpieces replaced, bodies taken apart and reglued in many cases, finish repairs... and yet they're all still worth millions largely regardless of that. The differences in value are more to do with their individual tone and history. I honestly think that old guitars may be seen more in that way than how they are now where originality is king, in time.
     
  19. Smakutus

    Smakutus Member

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    That's because there aren't too many of them in original shape (Are there any?). If there were hundreds of them in original shape the price on the ones you mention above would be a lot less.

    Jeff
     
  20. jtm622

    jtm622 Member

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    All you need to drive up the price of anything is two guys who both want the same thing and have big bank accounts to back up that "want". "Ego" will then drive that market...

    As far as the 300 year-old Stradivarius comparison goes, think about it like this: What will be the differential in "collector value" of a "non-modified" 1960 Les Paul as opposed to a "non-modified" 1968 Les Paul in 300 years?

    Today, it's a fortune; but by then, I'd say it would likely be close to nothing.
     

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