YEP. PRS MAKES THE BEST ELECTRIC GUITARS.

Tag

Platinum Supporting Member
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44,503
Let me add a comment about some small fine Luthiers today that are building great great guitars, huge resonance, excellent woods, and hope they get discovered and grow, unfortunately the big 3 manufacturers have the market.

There are, and I have owned guitars built by those who are considered to be as good as anyone on the face of the earth. One studied under not one, but TWO master luthiers.
My PRSs are right in there with them that cost $25,000 and up, all hand built by 1 guy.
PRSs, especially the Private stocks, are no joke.
They are as good as any guitar, at any price, new or vintage.
 

JB6464

Member
Messages
4,987
My PRSs are right in there with them that cost $25,000 and up, all hand built by 1 guy.
PRSs, especially the Private stocks, are no joke.
They are as good as any guitar, at any price, new or vintage.
But the big difference is you get the exact specs you want on the complete guitar head to toe with a private build , with PRS you get their specs only which is not a bad thing either if everything on the guitar is exactly the way you want it .
PRS builds are awesome and one of the best in todays market but your still stuck with their specs unless your JM or someone at that level .
 

piazzi

Member
Messages
990
New guitar day.

TOTALLY. BLOWN. AWAY.

4LBS 13 OUNCES DRIPPING WITH GIBSON CRUSHING TONES.

THE WOODS, THE WORKMANSHIP, THE FEEL, THE BALANCE, THE INLAYS, THE FLAME, THE COLORS, THE PLAYABILITY, THE TONES.

It's so light you would think it's filled with helium.
Talk about resonance???

o_O o_O o_O

:dude :dude :dude

:banana :banana :banana :banana :banana

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not really my cup of tea, but, forget me, this looks like it belongs to a museum of modern art
 

DiPa

Constant GAS
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
16,833
not really my cup of tea, but, forget me, this looks like it belongs to a museum of modern art
PRS wins in the art dept, he goes overboard in making that guitar an art piece, I love it, and they do sound Killer too.
 
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Tag

Platinum Supporting Member
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44,503
But the big difference is you get the exact specs you want on the complete guitar head to toe with a private build , with PRS you get their specs only which is not a bad thing either if everything on the guitar is exactly the way you want it .
PRS builds are awesome and one of the best in todays market but your still stuck with their specs unless your JM or someone at that level .

No. The PS program will build you almost anything you want if they think it's doable, and will guide you as well.
I do not know any of the finest builders who will do anything. They usually have base models to work from.
 
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Tag

Platinum Supporting Member
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44,503
Oh yeah, very serious, I was searching for an R9, Tag being the nice guy he is found this Murphy R9 for me to purchase, and I was not sure about the relic part of it, was thinking through it, and Tag snatched it. Haha that’s ok, it was funny.
I doubt Tag will go through the pickup swap, he was asked before and he did not want to.

One other point. Guys say PRS pups are horrid, yet others say it's the PRS pups that's making it sound better than the R9 with Custombuckers!
:roll

One thing that shows is that everyone is agreeing PRSs sound better than R9s!
:dude:dude:dude
 

Texsunburst59

Member
Messages
5,274
Same results with all my PRSs with various pups over the years, and it's acoustically that way as well. This particular R9 was fantastic acoustically too though. Rings like a bell. The PRSs are just a superior design and build. R9s are killer though. If it were not for PRS, an R9 or 335 would probably be my main guitar.

Not knocking you're R9,but I'm not impressed at with it's tone compared to the PRS in the video.

Personally I would NEVER have bought that R9 if I had a chance to A/B in a private auditioning room in a music store.

Nothing personal Tag, but that R9 in your video sounds VERY average.

There's nothing special about it's tone in your video.

The tone you're getting with your PRS is the chirpy singing upper midrange tone I dial my '09 PRS DGT 10-Top on my "Dumble style" amp.

That tone is what you need on a live stage to cut through the mix.

I've used my DGT on a big stage with a full band, and I never have a problem setting well in the overall mix.

A LOT of guys have no understanding that Paul R. Smith intentionally creates his pickups and guitar for the purpose of live stage use.

I've been to a seminar with David Grissom, and I was up front in the room, with him just 6 ft in front of me.

He was dialing in his tone while we waited for the seminar to start.

I noticed that his base tone was a little on the dark side, but I figured his pedals would remedy his tone.

Then he started stepping on his pedals one at a time and then in tandem, and that midrangy tone was there in spades.

He talked a bit and took questions before the seminar begin.

He then hit his laptop and the music started coming through the sound system.

When he began to play, his rhythms blended with the backing track without standing out hardly at all.

But once he kicked in his pedals for his lead lines, BANG, his leads came forward in the mix, and you could hear all his notes clear as day.

PRS really know what they're doing with their guitars, but the problem is most guys auditioning them are bedroom players.

Most PRS guitars that guys audition in music stores, will never be played live through a quality sound system like they were intended to be.
 
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fingertip

Squier to the Grand Funk
Platinum Supporting Member
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962
Well are you going to plug your guitar in so we can hear all this amazingness? Do we need to send you a cord?

:clips
 
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Tag

Platinum Supporting Member
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44,503
Not knocking you're R9,but I'm not impressed at with it's tone compared to the PRS in the video.

Personally I've would NEVER have bought that R9 if I had a chance to A/B in a private auditioning room in a music store.

Nothing personal Tag, but that R9 in your video sound VERY average.

There's nothing special about it's tone in your video.

The tone you're getting with your PRS is the chirpy singing upper midrange tone I dial my '09 PRS DGT 10-Top on my "Dumble style" amp.

That tone is what you need on a live stage to cut through the mix.

I've used my DGT on a big stage with a full band, and I never have a problem setting well in the overall mix.

A LOT of guys have no understanding that Paul R. Smith intentionally creates his pickups and guitar for the purpose of live stage use.

I've been to a seminar with David Grissom, and I was up front in the room, with him just 6 ft in front of me.

He was dialing in his tone while we waited for the seminar to start.

I noticed that his base tone was a little on the dark side, but I figured his pedals would remedy his tone.

Then he started stepping on his pedals one at a time and then in tandem, and that midrangy tone was there in spades.

He talked a bit and took questions before the seminar begin.

He then hit his laptop and the music started coming through the sound system.

When he began to play, his rhythms blended with the backing track without standing out hardly at all.

But once he kicked in his pedals for his lead lines, BANG, his leads came forward in the mix, and you could hear all his notes clear as day.

PRS really know what they're doing with their guitars, but the problem is most guys auditioning them are bedroom players.

Most PRS guitars that guys audition in music stores, will never be played live through a quality sound system like they were intended to be.

Yea, it's definitely just THAT Les Paul. It's a real clunker.
;)

I played "out" for around 20 years myself, all over NJ and New York state. Opened for Joe Perry, Queensryche and some other fairly big names. Played outdoor gigs, talent contests at bars (won) Lamours and big clubs in NYC, VFW halls, parties, dives, you name it. I always dialed in the same tones live as I did practicing in my room, same amps. Slight adjustment of EQ on the amp and or volume is all I ever needed, so the live vs room thing does not apply to me. I never understood that argument at all, because I never experienced it myself. I understand some people really seem to struggle with it however. Odd.
:dunno
 

Tag

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
44,503
Well are you going to plug your guitar in so we can hear all this amazingness? Do we need to send you a cord?

:clips

Of course. Work is just taking up every minute of my time right now. How do you think I could afford it?
:dunno
I will get some up over the weekend for sure!
And guess what I will plug into??
............Wait
for
it....................................................................





:banana :banana :banana :banana :banana :banana :banana :banana :banana :banana :banana:dude:dude:dude:dude:dude:dude:dude:dude:dude:dude

THE MIGHTY QUINN!!!!!!
 

rockabilly69

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,301
I've played out 28 yrs. and shared the stages with a lot of veteran touring pros.

I asked a lot of questions when we got to hang out back stage when they had the food and drinks out for all the bands.

I picked their brains on what works in a live mix, and YES the guitar makes a difference, as well as the amps, pedals, and the sound engineer.

The most common thing that these guys said, mind you they're mainly chicken pick'n country/rock players, was that you have to have a upper mid tone that will set you in the mix to be heard.

These are their words, and I'm just repeating what they said.

I followed their advice, and I would set my tone for more of a cut, so I could be heard within the dense mix of keys, bass, fiddle, steel, and even the drums.

I would always go out front during soundcheck and let one of the other guitarist in the band play my guitar with the band for a song, just to make sure I could be heard in the mix.

Even the best sound engineer can't always set the mix, so the guitar is present in the sonic spectrum.

Sometimes you have to coach him and let him know what your hearing or not hearing, so he understands what you're what you're looking for.

I noticed that even the best touring engineers focus on the drums and bass in the mix.

They want to get that big bottom sound,and set the mix so the drums and bass are the focus, at the expense of the vocals, keys, and the guitar.

I always coach the engineer and get him on my side.

As I said, I have toured professionally, own a recording studio, and I have also shared the stages with many people (Buddy Guy, Koko Taylor, Etta James, Dwight Yoakam, Bill Kirchen, Bo Diddley, Jason Isbell, Junior Brown, and many more), won my states South By Southwest Showdown, and won best Blues Band three years in a row in my state when the blues scene was bustling, so I understand on how to set up a guitar to sit in the mix. And I still think you can do it without having to have an overly middy guitar.

And, I'm still making my living as a full time guitarist singer, and still play on big stages quite frequently, and, I still think you are making generalizations about PRS players and bedroom playing. Many people that don't like the sound of PRS pickups, just don't like the sound, that's it. It has nothing to do with being a professional guitarist and knowing what to do on big stages. Their guitars are made extremely well, so if you need to change a set of pickups to get you there, just change the pickups.
 




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