Yes...the H9000 is real!

Discussion in 'The Rack Space' started by hendrik7, Dec 19, 2016.


  1. italo de angelis

    italo de angelis Member

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    The guy reports about two versions with different amount of DSPs. As for upgrade_ability... that's all to be seen.
    No info on the real ****, yet, unfortunately (algos size and sound)... stuff I'm *really* worried about. ARM processors are a big "?" to audio done at this kind of level.
    They may decide to keep the H8000FW alive for some time, depending on what the prices will be for the H9000 model(S) and parts still available for the 8K.
    I might be able to talk to somebody working on this new thing....
     
  2. italo de angelis

    italo de angelis Member

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    And I love they kept FW!!! I know you can use a thundershit to FW converter... but I'm holding on to all my Macs with FW.
    No "new guy". They may have given up on COM ports as people are just SO ignorant... that avoids the fight.
    I posted a couple of AIFF files months ago here... you should have seen the level of incompetence and aggressive response to it. They don't even use Google to know what a file is and how to open it... even though everybody has VLC on his/her PC/MAC/LINUX machines.
    COM IS the hardware industry standard and remains such. That's what you find on system automations interfaces. VERY reliable.
    Yeah, modularity can help but it all depends on what the "upgrade" packages will be. DSPs will very likely be a factory installed option.
    I can see going remote on iPad as that's the (wrong) trend in these days... but I would expect a real remote at this kind of professional level gear. It would be a serious protection for the user investment.
     
  3. magnex93

    magnex93 Member

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    Still no release date?:(I wish he had the same sounds as previous units!:D
     
  4. cbm

    cbm Silver Supporting Member

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    I'm glad they're ditching COM ports. They are large, slow, and more likely than not going to be driven from some sort of USB adaptor. It's hard to find modern motherboards with COM ports these days.
     
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  5. italo de angelis

    italo de angelis Member

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    See... more assumptions... against the poor little COM...
    many current motherboards do have serial connection on board. You just need a cheap panel with the actual RS port to wire to the board and mount on the back of the PC.
    Why a COM wouldn't be driven by an USB adaptor? I'm using two of them with 5 different PCs/Macs, running XP/Win7/10.6.8 and later, natively or in virtualization, without any issue.
    USB is a little smaller, yes...
    USB can be faster but not at Vsig... unless you have special drivers installed... which is more mess with computers OSs in time... oh yeah... try USB drivers with a Mac OS for total madness.
     
  6. italo de angelis

    italo de angelis Member

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    It's going to be long before reliability is reached.
    Sound? THAT's what I am very concerned about, too.
     
  7. pup tentacle

    pup tentacle Supporting Member

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    Remember when all the computers had COM ports? That was back when they really knew how to build 'em...
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2017
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  8. italo de angelis

    italo de angelis Member

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    Ha! That's a good one.
    To be really honest I have to say I remember some nasty machine back in the day... but hey... if you look at the current Mac Pro, you can't have seen anything worst than that in the whole IT history.
    Even Apple had to admit it! It would never be a decent computer not even with a dozen COMs on board.
    :p:brick:banana
     
  9. italo de angelis

    italo de angelis Member

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    I was thinking about this...
    I have seen DSP power growing like mushrooms in the last 25 yrs... to such a level I would really question myself about it.
    Unless really mad for algorithms design and the more nerdy things, wha would really be the reason to get a device like the H9000 in your rig?
    What would you really do with it/need it for... considering other ways one could use 6000$/€ (at least) to invest in different units?
    What IS your idea for such a power factory?
    I'm not that crazy because I could load 6 or 8 Black Hole reverbs, which is something a studio would like to be able to do.
    What would such kind of power unlock in your imagination/current rig?
     
  10. drbob1

    drbob1 Silver Supporting Member

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    What COULD you do? Go so far down the rabbit hole you'd never come out!

    How about down to the chip accurate emulation of the 2290, the PCM80/81? An effects building kit that allows that same level of granularity on things like the differences between LDR and FET phasers, for example. Running a complete rack of current processors in one box?

    Of course the problem is, who's going to program all that stuff? I'd guess you'll be on the cutting edge, Italo. So, imagine you've got 8 processors: one running your Dyno-My-Piano processor, another a 2290, another a PCM80, another the H949, another garden variety "guitar" effects. Still got 3 left to model what, amplifier and speaker?

    I dunno, what would YOU do with it, Italo?
     
  11. italo de angelis

    italo de angelis Member

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    Bob

    I know what I would do IF I had folks giving ME the modules for that kind of work. But my question is not about the way deep nerdy things. There's no end to that stuff... no DSP power is enough for the job.
    BTW... this new "200" box Bricasti has announced, ONLY analog I/O... with analog input stage, variable bit depth... now that's some kind of lab for that kind of thing.
    My question is about how the box is... what would the user do with that kind of power, architecture, etc...
     
  12. drbob1

    drbob1 Silver Supporting Member

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    Yeah, the M200 Bricasti sound WAY more interesting than the "vanilla" M7, since it'll have more "effects" reverb than just straight up modeling spaces. And with more processing at 1/2 the price? Kind of a no-brainer.
     
  13. cbm

    cbm Silver Supporting Member

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    And many (most?) motherboards don’t bother with serial ports. I bet they all have USB. Barely any laptops have serial ports these days, for sure.

    I never implied that you couldn't run a COM port from USB. There’s no benefit, though, just added cost and cabling / driver complexity. For example, there would be no need to set baud rate & stop bits at both ends of a connection with a true USB implementation on the Eventide.

    Isn’t this more of a limitation of the serial driver in the big Eventide units? Isn't even the slowest USB 1 connection a few times faster than the current Eventide serial connection?

    Other than vendors not providing updated drivers, I’ve not had much problem with USB on the Mac. Maybe I’ve just been lucky.

    ===

    The "U" in USB has been pretty much proven to be true: It is pretty universal. A good USB implementation in a new Eventide rack is a step forward, IMO.
     
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  14. italo de angelis

    italo de angelis Member

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    Chris

    i saw that coming. Of course they had to go USB... but it's not necessarily an improvement. It sure IS a simpler way to connect the unit to a computer.
    Transfer speed is not tremendously affected by the used protocol. Currently Vsig can use the H8000 FireWire 400 connection to transfer sigfiles. Even though that's faster then USB 2.0 you don't really get to notice a substantial difference in up/downloading sigfiles from using the COM port.
    There are nice uses for the COM port on the Eventide, when doing work with a MIDI controller or a keyboard using USB ports only (many modern ones unfortunately do not hve MIDI ports). Having Vsig on COM and MIDI on USB helps. And COM is more stable... always works. There is a reason why heavy machinery control still runs on it.
     
  15. italo de angelis

    italo de angelis Member

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    "Barely any laptops have serial ports these days, for sure."

    Ha!
    If you think you are going to do ANY Vsig work for the H9000, with over 300/400 modules in a sigfile... on a miserable laptop... today the biggest is a 15"... you are in for some serious self-punishment.
    That's gone long ago... when Orville came it was already impossible to work on a laptop... and I only use 17".
     
  16. Serious Poo

    Serious Poo Armchair Rocket Scientist Graffiti Existentialist Gold Supporting Member

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    Realistically, if I can program a unit like this to effectively replace my TC 2290 and 1210, reproduce the glorious 80's chorus sound of my TERC, reproduce the percussive delays of my SDD3000, and replace the other effects I currently get from my G-Force (reverb, tremolo, touch-sensitive formant vocalizations, noise gating) I'd be a very, very happy camper. That would free up at least 4 rack spaces, reduce the likelihood of equipment failure, and maybe even simplify my existing patching & routing.

    Beyond that, it might allow me to experiment with parallel routing of delay & reverb lines, something I don't currently do today.
     
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  17. chlorinemist

    chlorinemist Member

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    Update:
    News from the Lab: H9000 Part 1
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    • 8-Channel Analog In/8-Channel Analog Out
    • (2) XLR Analog In / (2) XLR Analog Out
    • MIDI In, Out, and Thru
    • 4 Female Type 2.0 USB ports
    • 1 USB Type B port, allowing 16 channels of USB audio in & out
    • 1 Ethernet port
    • (2) ¼" Expression Pedal jack
    • (2) ¼" Relay jacks
    • MIDI In, Out, and Thru
    • Word Clock In/Out
    • Optical In/Out
    • S/PDIF In/Out
    • AES/EBU In/Out
    • (3) Expansion I/O slots (For optional DANTE, MADI, and AVB)
     
  18. italo de angelis

    italo de angelis Member

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    Look more and more like a super G-Force!
     
  19. chlorinemist

    chlorinemist Member

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    just found way more

    Eventide exhibiting new H9000 flagship processor at AES New York 2017

    Recording technology trailblazer Eventide is proud to be exhibiting the H9000 — an all-new network-ready, 16-DSP, multi-channel, rackmount audio effects processing flagship, featuring eight times the processing power of the current-generation H8000 to continue the company’s unbroken cycle of delivering industry-leading signal processing power to the pro audio community — at AES New York 2017, October 18-20, Jacob J. Javits Convention Center, USA…

    The culmination of a multi-year development cycle, the H9000 features four quad core ARM processors serving as 16 DSP engines, eight channels of pristine analog audio I/O, AES/EBU, ADAT, 16 USB audio channels, and, optionally, connection to standard audio networks, including MADI, Dante, Ravenna, and more.

    Multichannel processing makes the H9000 a suitable platform for surround sound and for processing several tracks of audio simultaneously. On top of that, the H9000 introduces the concept of FX CHAINS, allowing users to connect any set of four effects with flexible routing. FX CHAINS can be created to act as a Voice Channel, a guitar ‘pedal board’, or a modular synth with effects, etc.

    The H9000’s remote control application, emote, is available for users working ‘in the box’ or over an audio network. emote is available as a standalone app for Mac and PC, and as an AU, VST, and Pro Tools plug-in.

    Says Eventide ‘resident fossil’ Anthony Agnello: “Audio effects designers are power-hungry souls. We have an insatiable thirst for processing power. With each advance in processing speed and storage capacity, new — often unimagined — effects become possible.

    “In the early Eighties, pro audio's first rackmount multi-effects processor, the SP2016, was used by researchers and developers to create groundbreaking effects. Back then, artificial reverberation was the holy grail, and the SP2016excelled at reverbs — both natural and unnatural, including infinite reverbs, inverse reverbs, gated reverbs, and more besides. But the SP2016 was designed as a general-purpose processor, and, as a consequence, new, innovative effects like shimmer, band delay, timescramble, and vocoding became commercially available for the first time.

    “The SP2016’s successor, the H3000, was the premier rackmount processor of the Nineties, and introduced a wealth of new effects. The H4000 and H8000 flagships were the most powerful rack boxes of their time and helped usher in the concept of surround sound reverb. The H9000 is ready to take its place at the Pinnacle of our product line and we’re eager to discover the kinds of new effects that lie in store.”

    Eventide will be demonstrating the H9000 alongside award-winning plug-ins on Booth #321 at AES New York 2017 — the 143rd International Convention — on October 18-20, Jacob J. Javits Convention Center, USA.

    Currently available in limited quantities, general availability of the H9000 is scheduled for March 31, 2018. (The H9000 will be available in two models — standard, with full front panel control, priced at $6,999.00 USD, and the blank front panel H9000R, priced at $4,999.00 USD.)
     
  20. bosetuno

    bosetuno Member

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    ARM processor. I didnt expect that.

    will be around 6-7k$. Really good price for whats of offer
     
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