• New Sponsor: ShipNerd, Ship Your Gear with Us... for less! Click Here.

Yngwie Malmsteen book 'Relentless'

Messages
1,861
I bought the book online and read it last night front to back.

It was cool to hear his side of everything, but he takes little accountability for his actions.

A member of Alcatraz and a guy from Steeler are both friends, so I was fact checking. His memory on certain events was dead on- others he portrayed in his vision.

It's not a bad read- for any guitarist a SHOULD read. You figure out how dedicated he was to guitar and music as a kid.
 

musicman10_1

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,980
Got it for Christmas and I'm just waiting for the right moment to sit down and read it. I've been a fan of YJM since the 80s and love the over-the-top personality nearly as much as I dig his playing.
 

TTripp

Member
Messages
1,867
I'll have to check it out. I remember when YJM hit the scene...it was like an alien landing.
 

sacakl

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
5,289
I haven't listened to Yngwie since the late-80's but I actually bought and read this book in search of some inspiration after an accident I was in that involved a traumatic brain injury where I couldn't feel my picking hand anymore. A lot of recovery and therapy went into him playing at that level again that I can somewhat relate to. Recovery from a head injury and fractures like that takes time and I'm glad I was persistent about still playing.
 

tiktok

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
23,338
I've read a lot of music autobiographies and they rarely improve my impression of the person. Andy Summers is the notable exception.
 

thornie

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,443
I read it front to back in one day as well. I was amazed at how many times he got ripped off by managers.
 

tiktok

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
23,338
I read it front to back in one day as well. I was amazed at how many times he got ripped off by managers.
I'm reminded of Buzz Osbourne's summation of many incidents in the music industry: "And then something went wrong, drugs were probably involved..."
 
Messages
1,861
I'm reminded of Buzz Osbourne's summation of many incidents in the music industry: "And then something went wrong, drugs were probably involved..."
Well Yngwie WAS an alien- he couldn't do the Steeler record until his visa came through.

I know Yngwie was doing massive coke at a period in his life. He ONLY makes reference to alcohol. Which caused him many more issues. ( nearly dying)
 

Redbell

Member
Messages
1,443
I'm an unabashed YNGWIE fan, loved the book. He admits to his faults and seems to have worked through most of them. Not as entertaining as Keith's book or as literate as Andy Summers but a good solid read anyway.
The downside for me on a lot of these books is that they talk very little about the music and guitar techinques and way too much about the "lifestyle," anyone else?
 

ZeyerGTR

Member
Messages
3,973
I thought it was a great read. I loved how much he talked about the early days, learning Blackmore stuff on one string, then moving to the next string, etc. Practicing on the train on the way to the studio, and using every minute of spare time to work at music.

Related, I just finished Buddy Guy's biography "When I Left Home." Different genre, but a lot of similarities. Fell in love with music, played his arse off, moved to a city which might as well have been a different country... Not quite as much debauchery with Buddy Guy, although he has some great stories about other blues cats of the era. I love the book, definitely recommended if you like guitar player biographies.
 

BobbyRyan

Member
Messages
183
I didnt read it yet, but I'm reading another biography of him written by a Swedish journalist. Yngwie refused to participate in that book, but many of his old childhood friends did :D The things they did back in the early 80's is just sick. They used to go to parties back in Sweden and rub their anuses with toothbrushes at the parties and then put them back by the sink.... Yngwie apparently was a cokehead and was pretty ****ed during the most part of the 80's, I dont know if he writes about this in "Relentness".
 

Echoes

Senior Member
Messages
6,218
The downside for me on a lot of these books is that they talk very little about the music and guitar techinques and way too much about the "lifestyle," anyone else?
Rock music is driven by the lifestyle. It's a few basic scales (including the harmonic minor and diminished in YJMs case) but the attitude and lifestyle is what drives the music.
 
Messages
6,290
Wouldn't surprise me a bit to find out he was using coke since that tends to make an already "overly healthy" ego even more over the top.

Glad to see he's straightened himself out - I'd love to read the book.
 

smallbutmighty

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
10,162
I'm an unabashed YNGWIE fan, loved the book. He admits to his faults and seems to have worked through most of them. Not as entertaining as Keith's book or as literate as Andy Summers but a good solid read anyway.
The downside for me on a lot of these books is that they talk very little about the music and guitar techinques and way too much about the "lifestyle," anyone else?
Yes, kind of. Talking about "guitar techniques" would reduce appeal to a very narrow market, but I would like to read more about how they navigated through the music biz to get to the top.
 

DirtyJerzey

Member
Messages
490
Kind of OT, but I was listening to Alcatraz just the other day. His playing at that young age was just amazing. He had a great Strat/Marshall tone too. It's a shame he kind of turned onto a punch line. His ego has always been his biggest enemy in my opinion.
 

ronmail65

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
3,557
Just finished it. It was pretty good. Not a deep dive into gear and guitar, but more than I've read about in other guitar players' autobiographies.

Surprises to me.... I was surprised at how much he was ripped off by managers. I liked his discussion on the industry and making music - how it has changed given the internet and digital technology. He has a good balanced view. Apparently Joe Lynn Turner is a pretty "out of control" dude -- not a lot of details revealed (which makes me think there's a lot of stories there).

Yngwie is definitely a highly motivated, driven, controlling, and self-absorbed individual. Some good messages in there, plus a lot of self promotion.

It was definitely worth the read.
 

BobbyRyan

Member
Messages
183
Again from the Swedish book I'm reading, Ron Keel's story about when Yngwie hit US soil for the first time. The band Steeler took their van to LAX to meet the young Swede, and it was apparently not what they had expected. They got a bad feeling right from the get go. When they met each other Yngwie just nodded to them and walked nonchalantly like he's been a rockstar for 20+ years. Right at their first rehearsal the day after Yngwie started to tell everyone how to play and was actually fired - this is not something Yngwie is very proud about and Im sure he does not mention that part in his own book. A few days later when Yngwie realized he will have to go home to Sweden he reconciled with the band and played the way Ron wanted him to play.
 






Trending Topics

Top Bottom