You Ever Replace a Better Player?

Discussion in 'The Sound Hound Lounge' started by Losov, Nov 28, 2019.

  1. lp_bruce

    lp_bruce Member

    Messages:
    17,633
    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2007
    Location:
    Metro Detroit
    I've replaced a couple of guys who were clearly better guitar players over they years.

    The guy I replaced in one band was just a phenomenal player--Berklee graduate and stellar soloist. Well known in the local scene. Super guy. I replaced him by being me. I sing (he doesn't) and I write (and play) music that supported the direction the band wanted to explore. I was essentially a better fit for that band and where they were headed.

    I've learned you don't need to be the best player to get gigs. You have to be a good player, well-prepared, easy to work with, and always serve the song/music. It helps if you can sing.
     
    drlucky and Lucidology like this.
  2. stanshall

    stanshall Member

    Messages:
    972
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2009
    Location:
    in the back of a dream car twenty foot long
    yes, he was an MVP for sure ... in the Faces
     
    Boris Bubbanov likes this.
  3. jiml

    jiml Supporting Member

    Messages:
    10,092
    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2002
    Location:
    amorica
    This..

    I got a few gigs because I listened more than speaking, playing the part more than overplaying, showing up on time rather than missing rehearsals.
     
    drlucky likes this.
  4. 27sauce

    27sauce Member

    Messages:
    34,085
    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2010
    Location:
    San Antonio
    chemistry goes a lot further than hot licks/flash. Taylor was a one dimensional player that benefited from being in a group at the height of their creativity...

    Wood was not only a great guitar player in his bands, but he is a writer, singer, bass player...team player.

    I’ll take that a million times over some noodles on top of great songs.
     
    lp_bruce and stanshall like this.
  5. stanshall

    stanshall Member

    Messages:
    972
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2009
    Location:
    in the back of a dream car twenty foot long
    /\ big fan of Ronnie in the Faces and his first three solo albums, but the Stones with Mick Taylor '69-'74 greatly outclassed the Stones with Woody, but to each his own ... anyway every longtime Stones fan I know laments the departure of Mick Taylor and his noodles, which some would call excellent soloing .....

    I'd take Some Noodles over Some Girls any day

    but as I said, I do dig I've Got My Own Album to Do and Now Look a lot, got 'em when they were new, still have 'em

    and Hey Negrita and Everything's Turning to Gold and Dance Pts. 1 & 2 were rocking, and Gimme Some Neck is a lot better for me than any Stones album since Tattoo You
     
    el greco, Salt Lake Bob and 27sauce like this.
  6. 27sauce

    27sauce Member

    Messages:
    34,085
    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2010
    Location:
    San Antonio
    oh absolutely, the Taylor era is my favorite. But, when comparing the two players, one obviously brings more to the table, and has across multiple groups, roles, instruments...

    I think if Taylor had done anything remotely near what he did in his time with the band, I would give him more credit for the “Taylor era”.
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2019
    el greco, Lucidology and stanshall like this.
  7. Laurence

    Laurence Silver Supporting Member

    Messages:
    6,611
    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2006
    Location:
    OK in the CA
    I typically start my own bands. I've joined already existing bands only five times. Two of those times was replacing someone who I thought was better than me. While I played the same arrangements I simply decided to be myself and play what I play. It worked.

    One of those players came back and rejoined the band, and OI stayed as well. We're a good match and play very well together.

    In addition to being punctual, supportive, postitive, learning quickly, remembering parts, etc. If I have anything going for me it's that I learned how to play in front of an audience with a band. Some 45+ years later it's hard to unlearn all those important things about making music with other people. The one thing you need to watch out for is losing your passion.
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2019
  8. ItsaRat!

    ItsaRat! Member

    Messages:
    950
    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2009
    Location:
    Kalamazoo, MI
    Better isn’t better if someone’s more accomplished technique causes them to play something that doesn’t suit the material. I’ve played with a number of peeps who could just play their asses off, but if the drum part they were playing wasn’t the most original, technical, difficult thing ever to play they’d slump over like Eeyore. Had a bunch of bassists like that too. When you’re trying to craft parts and hooks, and someone’s technical abilities aren’t paired with restraint or at the very least, taste, it isn’t fun. I’ll take a drummer who plays like a cave man and knows when and when not to play over someone who’s only means of amusing themselves is fitting as many notes and complex fills in as possible.
     
    drlucky likes this.
  9. GenoVox

    GenoVox Member

    Messages:
    2,594
    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2006
    Location:
    Buffalo, NY
    Just once... I replaced a guy that I knew, who definitely had better technique as a lead player, but wasn’t fond of playing rhythm (this was in a one guitar band)

    Plus I sang, could harmonize, and booked gigs - they told me it was a no-brainer :D
     
    Boris Bubbanov and Lucidology like this.
  10. whackystrings

    whackystrings Member

    Messages:
    3,787
    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2010
    Location:
    Vancouver, Canada
    Yes, but I was way more reliable, consistent, enthusiastic, and proved that I was keen to keep improving (and did).
     
  11. Tag

    Tag Gold Supporting Member

    Messages:
    37,566
    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2002
    Location:
    New Jersey
    As you improve as a musician, it is absolutely zero fun to have to play below the level you currently have achieved. If it's your primary job and $$$ intake, you have best be able to do it. If you play for fun, F it and find a better band.
    :dude
     
  12. gennation

    gennation Member

    Messages:
    7,193
    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2006
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI
    Just in the last week, I’m fortunate to have gotten a call to fill in for a friend who has run into hand problems over last year or so. He’s the guitarist who was with The Verve Pipe back in their heyday and has held a couple of solid gigs with many top notch local players.

    He’s one of the players I have been watching locally for decades now in Michigan...and even saw him open for KISS in Atlanta at The Omni back in 1996 after watch him/the band rise to that level locally for a couple years before that. (That wording was a little redundant but they we worked at getting where they got to back in the day)

    I’ve ended up filling in for a number of great local players, and am humbled, and appreciative to get those types of calls.
     
  13. Evandis

    Evandis Member

    Messages:
    55
    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2019
    Every single time I join a band...not really sure why I keep getting the spot really, lol.
     
  14. candid_x

    candid_x Supporting Member

    Messages:
    9,461
    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2007
    Location:
    AZ
    Better? Better how? Do I amuse you?
     
    drlucky likes this.
  15. Boris Bubbanov

    Boris Bubbanov Member

    Messages:
    23,566
    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2008
    Location:
    New Orleans + in the past
    Yes. I replaced a guy who were better player, but wouldn't agree to sing leads. Which sometimes was for the better - some of these voices; not real good.

    Another time I replaced another guy because the remaining guitar player and I wrote some decent songs together - the other guy didn't care to write, and was a born natural and often was impatient with the progress of others. Guys like that often don't like to rehearse.

    Let's be honest here. I would never have made it into any bands if I couldn't beat out the better players. They were everywhere!
     
    candid_x likes this.
  16. guitarman3001

    guitarman3001 Member

    Messages:
    9,353
    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2009
    QFT. I just had to leave a band because of that. I'm not a great player by any stretch of the imagination (I'll go as far as calling myself competent) but I'm very experienced and have a long positive track record. I auditioned for a band and got the spot but after a couple of "rehearsals" I realized they were nowhere near the level of experience or readiness I was looking for.
     
    Tag likes this.
  17. iluvstrats

    iluvstrats Member

    Messages:
    2,720
    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2002
    Location:
    Nashville, TN
    I didn't replace better players but joined a band that previously had Guthrie Trapp, and Kenny Vaughn as the guitarist. They're both tremendously good.
     
  18. squeally dan

    squeally dan Member

    Messages:
    5,050
    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2005
    Location:
    Huntsville, Alabama
    The bass player that fills in for me is a million times better but isn’t always the easiest guy to work with. I guess it really does help not to be an a hole.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice