You must unlearn..what you have learned..

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by Balok, Dec 20, 2005.


  1. Balok

    Balok Member

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    I'm an old school rock player from the Blackmore/Page/Hendrix/Montrose/Trower/Frampton/Derringer/Schenker era and have been trying to play faster in the last few years. I find I must let go of the iron grip style of squeezing tone from the neck, and let my fingers float over the strings like a water spider darting across a pond. It's a very different approach.
    It seems like after Malmsteen came to America in '82, young players saw what was possible with the right mindset and technique. They started playing this way from day one without speed or dexterity limitations built into their minds. I listen to a college radio show once a week that plays metal/thrash/epic etc. and these young players are unbelievably fast and fluid.

    I have had to "unlearn" a lot of old habits to get my speed up and re-calibrate my mind as to what's physically possible on the instrument.

    It's fun to get faster. Impossible arpeggios are actually possible if I tell myself "I can do this" and start slowly and build up.

    Anyone else been through this?
     
  2. dhodgeh

    dhodgeh Silver Supporting Member

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    Yep, going through it right now.

    What's really helping me a lot is a book entitled 'Raising the Barre'.

    It's a series of classical etudes that have been arranged for guitar with goal of improving technique. It's divided into various sections that focus on some different aspect of techinque.

    What I like best is that it is something different as far as excersizes are concerned, and you actually playing music that's kind of fun instead of the same set of scales over and over and over......

    Check it out......

    http://www.raisingthebarre.com/

    fwiw

    D
     
  3. rpavich

    rpavich Member

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    I've done the same thing...

    I saw Frank Gambale a long time ago and went gaga over sweep picking; so much so that I didn't nothing else for a year than relearn all my scales in "3-note-per-string" style and sweep my modes 2 hrs a day.

    Now here I am 10 years later...and other than helping me with my theory, that didn't do my a whole lot of good...

    Scales aint music...

    I've since slowed down and play "off chord tones" and play much more melodically....

    I guess I went in a circle...

    bob
     
  4. Dajbro

    Dajbro Member

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    Absolutely! We pick up a lot of bad habits out of lack of paying attention, desire for quick results, poor teachers, poor practice habits, and on and on and on.

    A good resource for working on the type of technical changes that you are talking about is http://www.guitarprinciples.com/

    Change is good!

    David
     
  5. Ah Xoc Kin

    Ah Xoc Kin Member

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    Another unlearner here :)

    I've benefited from Tomo's DVD and Troy Stetina's Speed Mechanics for Lead Guitar.
     
  6. PlexiBreath

    PlexiBreath Member

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    It's interesting how everyone wants to play faster. I've gone the other direction. I stopped using a pick in order to both slow down my playing, and bring new nuances to my tone. I'm not knocking playing fast, it's just in my case, fast is something I'm intentionally unlearning.
     
  7. donnyjaguar

    donnyjaguar Member

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    I find some guitars just lend themselves well to playing very quickly whereas others don't. My Strat isn't a speedy guitar but I can tear ass on my Tele.

    Practice some surf guitar music if you want to get your picking hand moving really fast. Now add your scale runs and arpeggios and you're almost there. I found playing awkward finger excersizes and modes got the coordination up quickly.

    DJ
     
  8. Ah Xoc Kin

    Ah Xoc Kin Member

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    I'm actually focusing a lot on playing slow. Most recently I took a slow 8-bar blues and took it from 60 bpm to 45 bpm. Playing slow is hard for me, so I have focused quite a bit on improving my timing below 60 bpm.
     
  9. Dajbro

    Dajbro Member

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    In an article a few years ago where he was asked what he practiced, Branford Marsalis said that he practiced classical saxophone pieces and worked on playing them slower and slower. (Or something to that effect)
    It was all about controlling the breath, dynamics, shaping the phrases, staying relaxed, etc. Good advice.

    David
     
  10. Kappy

    Kappy Member

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    Unlearn what I've learned? Perish the thought! If I could only remember all the things I've learned, then actually pull them all together into something interesting. Now that would be an accomplishment!
     
  11. Lucidology

    Lucidology Member

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    Yo David .... right on answer :AOK
     

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