Your favorite solos that you learned and it really added something to your playing.

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by jamminoutloud1, Jul 18, 2006.


  1. jamminoutloud1

    jamminoutloud1 Supporting Member

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    This thread mainly applies to Jazz players, but really it applies to everyone. I am very interested in seeing everyone's favorite solo that either they learned or transcribed. Mine would have to be John Scofield's "Wee". I gained such a large vocabulary after learning this solo. I would love to hear all of yours.
     
  2. Jeeves

    Jeeves Supporting Member

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    My favorite is an impromptu trombone solo on a track by LA musician Michael Ruff. The track is called 'Poor Boy' and the solo was played by the Swedish jazz artist Nils Landgren. Its basically just over a 2-chord vamp but its just killer. I transcribed it note-for-note and it helped me greatly.
     
  3. Doug

    Doug Member

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    "Hug You, Squeeze You" from SRV at the El Mocambo. There are some really cool and unusual blues licks in there that I incorporate into my playing all the time. The b2nd in the lick he plays over the 5 chord just kills me. He used that all the time in his solos, and it always sounded great to me. Also, the chromatic lick in the second section of the solo over the 4 chord is still, to me, the coolest thing I've ever lifted off a recording. :dude
     
  4. Tinman

    Tinman Member

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    Learning the solos in Sultans of Swing had the biggest impact on my playing. By the way, why does this thread mostly apply to jazz players?
     
  5. Serious Poo

    Serious Poo Armchair Rocket Scientist Graffiti Existentialist Gold Supporting Member

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    David Sanborn's sax parts from "Maputo". I learned more about phrasing and tone from that solo than anything else I can think of. Oh, and I'm not a jazz player.
     
  6. that_brianm_guy

    that_brianm_guy Gold Supporting Member

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    "Crazy Little Thing" Queen, Brian May.

    it sounded simple, but when I went to play it... the phrasing was very different from how I normally play, and the fingerings I ended up with were again very different from my prior habits.

    I've dropped parts or all of it into blues, country, and even some jazz-bop type stuff.



    /brian
     
  7. raz

    raz Member

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    To date:

    SRV - "Pride and Joy" and "Texas Flood"
    Jimi Hendrix - "Red House"
    Doc Watson - "Beaumont Rag"
    Cream - "Crossroads"
    ZZ Top - "La Grange"
    Freddie King - "Hideaway" and "I'd Rather be Blind"

    Nothing terribly exotic here, but these have given me most of my vocabulary so far.
     
  8. Teahead

    Teahead Member

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    Jimi Hendrix, All Along The Watchtower & Little Wing.
    Jonny Greenwood, Paranoid Android.
    George Harrison, Something.
    Miles Davis, So What.

    Ok, maybe I only learned phrases from Miles, but the principle is the same.
     
  9. DrSax

    DrSax Member

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    charlie parker: "Scrapple from the Apple", "Now's the Time", though i'm not perfect on these yet (far from it). A host of other Parker tunes i'm studying, he floors me. Just when you think your phrasing swings, just listen to any Bird and it's like "oh, no, THAT's it".
     
  10. scottlr

    scottlr Member

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    The entire 1st ZZ Top LP was a turning point for my playing, back in about 1970.
     
  11. KRosser

    KRosser Member

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    Sonny Rollins and Thelonius Monk - The Way You Look Tonight
    John Coltrane - Moment's Notice
    Herbie Hancock - Dolphin Dance
    Miles Davis and Wayne Shorter - Freedom Jazz Dance
    Chet Baker - a Bb blues I forget the name of.

    I learned and spent a lot of time with these solos in the 80's when I was doing that sorta thing a lot. Although I never knowingly quote 'licks' from them, their impact on me was IMMENSE, and still surfaces in fairly oblique ways to this day.

    Another thing I did which I found really interesting was to transcribe one chorus each by many players doing All The Things You Are, and I did many - Django, Scofield, McCoy Tyner, Sonny Rollins, Jim Hall, Bill Frisell, Bill Evans, Mulgrew Miller, Ben Webster - I'm forgetting a few...anyway, learning one chorus each from the various different styles & eras, especially stacking them next to each other to compare, that was a great education...

    I did the same thing with 'rhythm changes' as well...
     
  12. Sharkey

    Sharkey Member

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    David Gilmore's Comfortably Numb solo. The dynamics and note selection in this one still moves me to this day when I hear it. It's not blazing fast or super technical, just a textbook lesson in guitar phrasing and tone that fits perfectly within the context of a given song. Inspirational piece to me at least.:AOK
     
  13. Sub-D

    Sub-D Guest

    Not a solo but,
    Pat metheny first circle full score transcription, it really opened my ears
    to the whole 3 and 2's thing in odd time composition.......

    Keith Jarret "Lover man" off tribute, particularly his improvised intro,
    like all his intros they are just amazing improvisational gems......

    I have been slacking on transcribing as of late., for years I would
    transcribe first thing in the morning, anything . It became a sort of meditation and warmed up my ears and fingers real well..........
    need to get back to it......

    (Edit) Oh yea!! liebman and grossman's sax playing on "taurus people" off "live at the lighthouse" (Elvin Jones)...cool stuff on there,
    Just a great record to have very inspired playing by the whole band and many melodic modern lines/solos to transcribe or just listen to on the whole record.....
     
  14. Tomo

    Tomo Member

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    Good thread. I don't know which tune is my favorite?
    Have done many transcription and imitating tone and nuances
    or just intence listening....

    Tomo
     
  15. pbradt

    pbradt Senior Member

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    Never did that. I don't copy solos.
     
  16. gennation

    gennation Member

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    Probably the Smash Hits album from the Hendrix collection. That was the first one I tore apart.

    After that it was about every album by Zep.

    Years later Van Halen I.

    Then much of the Friday Night in San Francisco album, that one has had the longest lasting affect I think.

    I'm sure the endless amounts I learn while in cover bands had a profound affect too.
     
  17. jamminoutloud1

    jamminoutloud1 Supporting Member

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    Wow, cool responses guys, thanks for responding. A lot of people don't like to transcribe for various reasons, but really transcribing has been the best thing for me. My playing and phrasing has never sounded better. It always helps me think differently than I usually would over chord changes, and I feel more inspired everytime I pick up my axe, which is a great thing.
     
  18. Flyin' Brian

    Flyin' Brian Member

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    Wes Montgomery "If you Could See Me Now" and "Sundown"
     
  19. MGT

    MGT Member

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    As a 19 year old who was into metal at the time, learning the Bark at the Moon album (Ozzy) was a revelation - it was much different than the classic rock stuff (now older Ozzy is classic rock!) at the time, at least to me.

    Another big one for me was learning bits & pieces from Al Dimeola's Electric Rendezvous (at around the same time period). It opened my mind to another world & really got me interested in theory & scales.

    Over twenty years later (after picking up the guitar again after almost that long), I'm finding that figuring out solos (Larry Carlton, etc) is where it's at....I have no interest in sounding like someone else but I do want to know what was going on his/her head when the recording was taking place.
     
  20. Tomo

    Tomo Member

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    Thanks for making this thread. I have transcribed many tunes by many artists,
    include sax, trumpet, singer,organ... first time I couldn't even write it down, more you do it, it became fun things to do. Good goal to have. Now I don't do that much but having good skills, good ear, time, all help your playing. I still use
    some of my transcriptions for my students. Charlie Christian's "Rose Room"
    Jaco's "Teen Town" for funky 16th, time feel... Chat Baker's jazz blues solo for
    singing qaulity... Larry Carlton's solo on Kid Charlemagne (Steely Dan), of course B.B. King's "Everyday I have the blues" for call & response... solo, horn sections, bass lines those 3 ... Okie Dokie Stomp by Gatemouth Brown,
    Two bones and a pick by T-Bone..... without transcribing I couldn't reach this far.


    Tomo
     

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