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Zoom 1608 Mrs

Discussion in 'Recording/Live Sound' started by Bloozman, Mar 1, 2006.

  1. Bloozman

    Bloozman Member

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    Whats the general consensus on the Zoom 1608 MRS with CD burner for a 5 piece blues band to record a Demo tape on for gig prospects?...Can one make some decent recordings on it, or is it Mickey Mouse junk? I have a friend that is capable of recording us, and I wanted to know if its worth the $800.00 investment, or would the $800.00 be better spent in a real studio?..Thanks in advance for any opinions...
     
  2. duffyguitarman

    duffyguitarman Member

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    This is pretty much a continuation from your other thread. Most units out there would be fine. There are only 2 mfctrs. of converter AD-DA's chips now, so they all pretty much have the same thing inside. The pre's will be where there are differences. It shows that you can only record 8 trks at a time. So, you won't be able to track all at once unless you do subgroup or just overhead&kick on the drums.
    Your other thread seemed like you really wanted to do a multi-track thing, so I encourage you to look again at my post and make sure you will be able to deal with all the stuff you need.

    Where are you located? I or other's here might have resourses that we can use to help you.



    Best of luck,
    duffy
     
  3. Bloozman

    Bloozman Member

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    Originally Im from Chicago, but Ive retired to wetsern N.C. In small town outside of Asheville...Our band doesnt have much money, and most places want a demo tape before they hire us...hence the idea about getting the Zoom machine and making one ourselves with the help of a local newbie recording engineer...One of the band members owns a band supply store, and he has access to mics and stands etc...so the investment would be just the cost of the machine, and the engineer who wants $15.00 per hour to do the work...I think thats a bargain, and we would still own the machine for future use. However Im really ignorant in regards to recording..I just play, so this would be a new experience for us..hence all the questions...Hope you can help...Thanks again
     
  4. duffyguitarman

    duffyguitarman Member

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    I did a little reasearch for you and came up with a couple that might fit your needs.
    http://www.starlightstudios.net/
    http://www.ashevillerecording.com/

    Both have ample facilities and decent gear selection. One shows an hourly rate of $30 per.hr but said a day block rate is availible upon request. My guess it would work out to around $25 per hr.
    The other show's $55 per hr. but has an 8 hr. day block for $275.
    These rates are very good and you don't have to worry about anything except going in, setting your own gear up and playing.

    I would think that you could do this and have a decent rough mix in one day, if your band is prepared. Don't screw around. Have fun, 'cause that will help make a good vibe, but don't just blow time B.S.ing ect. Considering it is a club gig demo, I would not do too much messing around in the mix anyway. Just throw up a little bit of room verb on drums, a little verb/short delay on vocs., make sure that everything is sitting fairly nice in the mix, and go for burning the master. Don't get too carried away with fixing little things. That is a big time eater. Besides if you have to fix much on standard cover stuff, you should not be out trying to get gigs anyway. :lol: Also, don't let the studio talk you into a big "mastering session". Standard normalizing/mastering programs on the mix bus will suit your needs just fine.

    If I were you, this is the route I would go. Then maybe put some of the gig money you make away for purchasing some recording gear down the road, if you have a space that is condusive.


    Peace,
    duffy
     
  5. Strat-o-Ck

    Strat-o-Ck Guest

    I bought one for that very purpose, and have the same kind of band. I got a better deal than that on it though. It was the best money I think I've ever spent on musical equipment. The studio thing takes the complication out of making the recording yourself, but then you have a whole other set of problems to deal with.

    The advantage to buying a unit like the Zoom is that its yours and you can use it to record any an every practice or performance that the band ever does. The unit does an awful lot of stuff. Too much for me to deal with. All I bought it for was to record demos, practice and performance...basically live recordings. The eight tracks are plenty for that type of recording.

    Its pretty simple to use for live recordings and you don't have to be an engineer. I also think it would be a waste to pay some guy $15 an hour to do engineering for you. It just ain't that difficult. You would want to record your rehearsals for a few weeks and experiment with mic placement, room, etc until you get the sound that you're happy with. Then record the next few rehearsals with the sole purpose of getting the demo recorded. The unit has some nice mastering effects that are pretty easy to use. I prefer not to use the effects and stick to the natural sound of the recording.

    Now, if you are completely disfunctional with electronic equipment, then it may not be such a good idea. But if you are fairly literate with electronics and can read a few basic directions from a manual and do something, then you should be okay.

    Good luck.
     
  6. Strat-o-Ck

    Strat-o-Ck Guest

    I could email you a few short clips of demos that I've made with mine if you'd like.
     

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